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Experts revealed why some mothers get attached to bringing their children to school, Sarah Agar-Brennan, 46, (photo) from Leeds, says taking her son Daniel, 16, a & # 39; guilty pleasure & # 39; is

Daniel Agar-Brennan is 16 years old and studies for his A-levels and excels in hockey, a sport that is associated with rough and tumble.

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You wouldn't think the kind of boy his mother needed to keep his hand at school. But mother Sarah insists on getting up early every morning for the ten-minute ride to school.

Work and meetings are organized around this commitment. The school run, she says, is not negotiable.

According to last year's National Traffic Survey, 57 percent of 11 to 16 year olds are brought to school by an adult, compared to 31 percent in 2014. In the 1970s, almost every 11 year old went to school alone.

Some call this even more mollycoddling by modern mothers, another example of helicopter parents who refuse to raise their children.

Experts revealed why some mothers get attached to bringing their children to school, Sarah Agar-Brennan, 46, (photo) from Leeds, says taking her son Daniel, 16, a & # 39; guilty pleasure & # 39; is

Experts revealed why some mothers get attached to bringing their children to school, Sarah Agar-Brennan, 46, (photo) from Leeds, says taking her son Daniel, 16, a & # 39; guilty pleasure & # 39; is

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Not so, says Sarah Agar-Brennan. "Daniel loves the extra half hour he gets in bed versus taking the bus. My motivation is that it gives me valuable time with him, "admits Sarah (46), a business coach, who lives in Leeds with software consultant husband Carl (45).

The couple has a daughter, Ellie, 18, at the university in Paris – another reason why Sarah clings to the school run. & # 39; In a few years he will be gone, just like Ellie, & # 39; she adds.

Consultant psychologist Dr. Elena Touroni says there are several reasons why mothers of older children get so attached to the school run.

& # 39; Parents may not accept that their children are more mature and able to do certain things themselves & # 39 ;, explains Dr. Touroni, co-founder of the Chelsea Psychology Clinic.

"Likewise, the school run can provide a lot of valuable pleasure. The most important thing is that parents make normal exploration of the world possible and that children have the feeling that they can say whether they would rather take the bus with their friends. & # 39;

When Sarah & # 39; s children were small, they lived in the North Yorkshire countryside, where walking or catching the bus to school was not possible. When they moved to Leeds eight years ago, she briefly remembers resentment. & # 39; The children's schools were not within walking distance and I remember thinking: "Why can't there be a school bus?" Then I realized how much I loved all the things we did in the car, listening to Harry Potter audio books, singing and inventing rhymes.

"The most important thing was that Ellie and Daniel felt they could talk about fears."

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By the time they went to high school and a bus route was available, Sarah was emotionally invested in their daily routine.

Jacqueline White, 41, (photo) from Kent, claims that she is taking her son Ethan, 14, to school because she fears he will be bullied on the bus

Jacqueline White, 41, (photo) from Kent, claims that she is taking her son Ethan, 14, to school because she fears he will be bullied on the bus

Jacqueline White, 41, (photo) from Kent, claims that she is taking her son Ethan, 14, to school because she fears he will be bullied on the bus

Fortunately for her, Daniel says he is not ashamed to be taken to school by his mother.

"Many children are being dropped off," he says. & # 39; Mom just drives by and I jump out. I'm always tired, so I really get that extra 30 minutes of sleep. I am grateful to Mommy. & # 39;

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Sarah is meanwhile adamant that she is not a helicopter parent: "They are more likely to talk when they have just left school instead of home where there are other distractions. I am not an overbearing mother, we just love to spend time as a family. & # 39;

Regarding her ecological footprint, Sarah says she compensates for her 50 miles a week by eating organic, locally produced food, being vegan and buying sustainable clothing. The school run is her "guilty pleasure".

Jacqueline White spends almost three hours a day in the car with her middle child, Ethan, 14, from and to high school. "It can take 40 minutes each way and costs around £ 40 a week in fuel.

"But I have a small car with a stop-start function to reduce emissions," says Jacqueline, 41, a Kent-based therapist who specializes in stroke rehabilitation.

So why the extra hassle? Jacqueline, who has two other children, Tiegan, 18, and Ewan, eight, is convinced that her son would be bullied on the bus. "He is short, shy and geeky – a classic target."

Sally Keane, 57, (photo) from Worcestershire, takes the opportunity to have in-depth conversations with her daughters Annabel and Charlotte during school runs
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Sally Keane, 57, (photo) from Worcestershire, takes the opportunity to have in-depth conversations with her daughters Annabel and Charlotte during school runs

Sally Keane, 57, (photo) from Worcestershire, takes the opportunity to have in-depth conversations with her daughters Annabel and Charlotte during school runs

Sheela Mackintosh-Stewart, a relationship expert and family law attorney, says this is a common concern. "Mothers may be afraid of what their children will face or face when they are not there. By doing the school run, they can keep an eye on them. "Jacqueline, married to Montague, 51, a photographer, got her school career when Tiegan developed a condition at the age of 13 that caused her knees and ankles to swell.

For a year she was unable to walk between bus stops, at home and at school, so Jacqueline started taking her by car. When Tiegan recovered, neither of them wanted to give up their shared trip. "When Ethan went to high school, I didn't send him to the bus stop," Jacqueline adds.

"Ethan has a creaking personality, but as the middle child between a dominant sister and a demanding brother, he doesn't have that much voice at home. In the car he opens me up about everything from school to friendships, and problems that his friends have that they have trusted him. It is an opportunity for me to help him. & # 39;

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Carrie Winnall is so devoted to the school run of her twin 13-year-olds that when they went to high school two years ago, she took the extraordinary step of changing jobs to keep going.

& # 39; I had no choice but to take them to primary school because it was two miles on country roads & # 39 ;, says Carrie, 47, who works in admin and lives in Devon with husband Matt, 48, a purchasing manager, and twin Gracie and Jaydn.

Carrie Winnall, 47, (photo) from Devon, cherishes taking her twin to school and even changed jobs to keep it up

Carrie Winnall, 47, (photo) from Devon, cherishes taking her twin to school and even changed jobs to keep it up

Carrie Winnall, 47, (photo) from Devon, cherishes taking her twin to school and even changed jobs to keep it up

"Before they went to high school, we were talking about the bus, because I had driven them in the opposite direction of my work. I then decided to look for a new job instead of giving up that time with my children. I cherish our 20 minute journey & # 39 ;, she explains. "My daughter in particular uses it to talk about possible worries."

Mother of four Sally Keane regrets that she did not do the school run with her oldest couple, so she is now committed to dropping off her younger two – despite spending two and a half hours a day Annabel, 12 and Charlotte, 15, to their schools.

"When my older children grew up, I worked full time. I have never had the luxury of running to school & # 39 ;, Sally, 57, explains a life coach who is married and lives in Worcestershire.

"My eldest says she loved me to pick her up, so I'm determined to do this for Annabel and Charlotte. Charlotte is at a precarious age, but feels reassured by spending time with me and unloading about her day.

& # 39; Because it is a longer trip, we have time for those in-depth conversations. When we get home, she disappears to her room like teenagers. & # 39;

Yet the girls have rules: mommy has to wait along the way from the school gate, and giving a hug or kiss is a no-no.

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But Sally adds, "So many parents hate the school run, but if you can't do it, you realize it's something precious."

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