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Jasmyn (left) and her mother Melody Ward (right) camped when Jasmyn's health suddenly changed

& # 39; Our world fell apart & # 39 ;: the desperate plea of ​​single mother after her young daughter, 12, was diagnosed with renal failure

  • Jasmyn Campbell, from Cairns, was only 12 when her health suddenly took a turn
  • She was diagnosed with end-stage renal disease and needed a new kidney
  • She spent a year on a dialysis machine before the call came in on her birthday
  • Her mother Melody has insisted that others consider becoming an organ donor
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A single mother has made a desperate plea for more people to become an organ donor after her daughter was diagnosed with renal failure.

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Jasmyn Campbell, from Cairns, Queensland, was only 12 when she went from an active little girl with a passion for kickboxing to being stuck in a hospital bed.

& # 39; It was terrible. Our world fell apart. Everything was perfect and then this happened, & # 39; her mother Melody Ward told Daily Mail Australia.

Jasmyn (left) and her mother Melody Ward (right) camped when Jasmyn's health suddenly changed

Jasmyn (left) and her mother Melody Ward (right) camped when Jasmyn's health suddenly changed

& # 39; She was on dialysis for a year, which was hard on her small body.

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& # 39; It was terrible. It has drained her body. She was weak, she was sick, she was tired. & # 39;

Mrs. Ward said it felt like she had a newborn baby again, because Jasmyn needed care 24 hours a day.

& # 39; I used to call our kidney nurse crying and ask her how long it would take. She would say she doesn't know, stay strong.

& # 39; Things became very difficult towards the end. I didn't know how much more I could handle and then we got that call exactly at the right time. & # 39;

The call that changed their lives for the better came at 2.36 a.m. on Jasmyn's 13th birthday.

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11 teenage girls were at home for a sleepover when they were told that a new kidney was waiting for Jasmyn.

& # 39; It was terrifying. It is a bittersweet feeling because someone mourns his child and we celebrate. It's very difficult, & Mrs. Ward said.

& # 39; I had to wake their father in the middle of the night. I had to leave all the children and race to the airport and catch the first flight. I was panicking. We didn't pack anything or anything. When we arrived in Brisbane, we were not prepared. & # 39;

But luckily the operation was a success.

The 12 months were tough for Jasymn and her family. She was on a dialysis machine for 11 hours every night for 12 months

The 12 months were tough for Jasymn and her family. She was on a dialysis machine for 11 hours every night for 12 months

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The 12 months were tough for Jasymn and her family. She was on a dialysis machine for 11 hours every night for 12 months

The life-changing call came through at 2.36 pm on Jasymn's 13th birthday - she got a new kidney

The life-changing call came through at 2.36 pm on Jasymn's 13th birthday - she got a new kidney

The life-changing call came through at 2.36 pm on Jasymn's 13th birthday – she got a new kidney

More than a year at Jasmyn is a happy, healthy teenager.

She has not been able to return to kickboxing, but instead has taken over CrossFit and gymnastics.

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Mrs. Ward is now urging everyone to consider becoming a donor.

& # 39; It is just that important to become an organ donor. I'm just so passionate about it, & she said.

& # 39; It saves lives like my little girl. We don't need our organs when we die. It is so important. It is the best gift ever and we are so grateful. & # 39;

Jasmyn Campbell, from Cairns, was only 12 when she went from an active little girl with a passion for kickboxing to being stuck in a hospital bed

Jasmyn Campbell, from Cairns, was only 12 when she went from an active little girl with a passion for kickboxing to being stuck in a hospital bed

Jasmyn Campbell, from Cairns, was only 12 when she went from an active little girl with a passion for kickboxing to being stuck in a hospital bed

What is end stage renal disease?

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End stage kidney disease is the gradual loss of kidney function.

Kidneys filter waste and excess fluids from your blood, which are then excreted in your urine. When your kidneys lose their filtering capacity, dangerous levels of fluid, electrolytes and waste can accumulate in your body.

End stage kidney disease means that a person needs dialysis or a kidney transplant to stay alive.

Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, tiredness and weakness, changes in the amount you urinate and persistent itching

Source: Mayo Clinic

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