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Emine Badegül Bulut depicted with her daughter. She was put to death on Sunday by her ex-husband in a cafe in Kirikkale, Turkey

The victim of a high-profile murder in Turkey sought help at a police station two hours before her ex-husband stabbed her and killed her, but officers failed to provide help, lawyers have claimed.

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The legal team for Emine Bulut's 38-year-old family said she sought refuge and sought help from officers who stayed at the station for 29 minutes. They added that her pleas were ignored.

The trial against Bulut & ex 39; s ex-husband and suspected murderer, Fedai Varan, 43, started yesterday in Kırıkkale in Central Anatolia. He is confronted with life imprisonment if he is convicted for the murder.

The death of Bulut in August led to a debate about femicide in Turkey and drew attention to the increasing violence against women in the country.

Her mother had divorced her husband four years earlier, was stabbed in a cafe for her 10-year-old daughter in the central Anatolian town of Kirikkale. She died later in the hospital.

Emine Badegül Bulut depicted with her daughter. She was put to death on Sunday by her ex-husband in a cafe in Kirikkale, Turkey

Emine Badegül Bulut depicted with her daughter. She was put to death on Sunday by her ex-husband in a cafe in Kirikkale, Turkey

A Turkish woman (left) was stabbed for her 10-year-old daughter
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A Turkish woman (left) was stabbed for her 10-year-old daughter

A Turkish woman (left) was stabbed for her 10-year-old daughter

A Turkish woman (left) was stabbed for her 10-year-old daughter

Shivering images show a Turkish woman (left in both images) shouting & # 39; I don't want to die & # 39; after being stabbed by her ex-husband. Her daughter begged her to stay alive

A video of the aftermath of the attack was posted online with Bulut in the cafe, covered in blood, yelling at her daughter: & # 39; I don't want to die. & # 39;

The tearing girl says: "Mom, please don't die.

Bulut & ex 39; s former husband Fedai Varan, 43, is imprisoned for life for "intentional killing with monstrous feelings" when sentenced.

He told the police that Bulut had insulted him.

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He appeared via a video link in the courtroom in Kirikkale, near Ankara, where the proceedings were difficult to get started due to the large number of journalists and lawyers trying to follow the proceedings.

According to the women's rights group We Will Stop Femicide, 121 women were killed in 2011.

In 2017 that was 409, while 440 were killed in 2018.

In the first nine months of 2019, a total of 354 women died.

Experts say that the violence is partly due to the fact that women exercise greater liberties – not always welcome in conservative parts of Turkish society.

Protesters gather outside the Kirikkale courthouse to protest outside the husband's first hearing suspected of murdering his 38-year-old wife, Emine Bulut, in August.
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Protesters gather outside the Kirikkale courthouse to protest outside the husband's first hearing suspected of murdering his 38-year-old wife, Emine Bulut, in August.

Protesters gather outside the Kirikkale courthouse to protest outside the husband's first hearing suspected of murdering his 38-year-old wife, Emine Bulut, in August.

Women's rights groups gather outside the Kirikkale courthouse in Central Anatolia. The murder led to the debate about the increasing violence against women in the country

Women's rights groups gather outside the Kirikkale courthouse in Central Anatolia. The murder led to the debate about the increasing violence against women in the country

Women's rights groups gather outside the Kirikkale courthouse in Central Anatolia. The murder led to the debate about the increasing violence against women in the country

Divorce or filing criminal complaints against violent partners can also lead to assault and murder in a society where many men still do not consider women to be equal.

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Activists have criticized the fact that in some murder cases, Turkish courts have issued reduced prison sentences for suspects claiming they have & # 39; provoked & # 39; to be.

Women's rights groups attended demonstrations outside the courthouse on Wednesday.

Turkey has ratified the 2011 Council of Europe Istanbul Convention on the Prevention of Domestic Violence and has relevant laws for the scourge.

But activists say that the government should be much more proactive in applying the laws and working on protecting women.

They point to a lack of care for women in need and underline the importance of addressing the broader issue of gender inequality in Turkish society.

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& # 39; There must be a broad education. The laws should be applied where necessary by judges, prosecutors and by the police, & # 39; said Nuray Cevirmen of the Human Rights Association in Ankara.

Bulut (far left) with her daughter and another family member. In a horrible video clip on social media she can be heard screaming & # 39; I don't want to die & # 39;

Bulut (far left) with her daughter and another family member. In a horrible video clip on social media she can be heard screaming & # 39; I don't want to die & # 39;

Bulut (far left) with her daughter and another family member. In a horrible video clip on social media she can be heard screaming & # 39; I don't want to die & # 39;

& # 39; Mechanisms to prevent violence against women and the number of hiding places should be increased & she added.

Cevirmen criticized suggestions in some court cases that women's actions or clothing had somehow caused violence against them.

Varan told a court hearing earlier: & # 39; After she had insulted me while I was talking about custody of our child, I stabbed her with the knife I had brought. & # 39;

The name of Bulut was a worldwide trending topic on Twitter and & # 39; I don't want to die & # 39; (#olmekistemiyorum) was widely quoted on social media, where users insisted on stricter measures to tackle domestic violence.

Officials, including Justice Minister Abdulhamit Gul, condemned the murder soon after the video was published, along with celebrities and football clubs such as Besiktas.

& # 39; We expect the killer to be punished in the most serious way & # 39 ;, tweeted president spokesman Ibrahim Kalin.

The murder of Bulut (right) led to a wave of protest and calls on social media and Turkish politicians to tackle violence against women

The murder of Bulut (right) led to a wave of protest and calls on social media and Turkish politicians to tackle violence against women

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The murder of Bulut (right) led to a wave of protest and calls on social media and Turkish politicians to tackle violence against women

Omer Celik, spokesperson for President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's ruling party, said after a party meeting that & # 39; we should shake the earth & # 39; to stop violence against women.

The government said a team of psychologists took care of the child.

Turkey is struggling to control the increasing violence against women.

In the first six months of 2019, 214 women were killed by men, while 440 women were killed last year, according to the women's group We Will Stop Femicide.

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That was an increase of 409 women in 2017 and 121 in 2011.

Although the government acknowledges the issue of violence against women, critics say that not enough is being done to provide shelter and to address the wider problem of gender inequality that permeates society.

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