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Jessica Middour, 46, started to sweat and be sick when she brought her mother to the hospital for an operation in November 2015

A mother who fought three times against sepsis told how she swept away the symptoms of the deadly disease as being in transition.

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Jessica Middour, 46, started to sweat and be sick when she brought her mother to the hospital for an operation in November 2015.

She rejected the symptoms – significant signs of sepsis – as due to hot flashes and nerves, only to faint and discover that she had a UTI.

Doctors who treated Ms. Middour in the emergency room warned that she was in a septic shock and rushed her to intensive care.

The former bank employee from Waynesboro, Pennsylvania, spent a week fighting for her life in the hospital before being allowed to go home.

Ms. Middour was hit again six months later in April 2016 by sepsis caused by a UTI, followed by her third near-death trial in January 2017, where she even said goodbye to her family.

Jessica Middour, 46, started to sweat and be sick when she brought her mother to the hospital for an operation in November 2015

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Jessica Middour, 46, started to sweat and be sick when she brought her mother to the hospital for an operation in November 2015

Now she shares her story to encourage people to never take away their symptoms and ask doctors if it & # 39; sepsis & # 39; can be if they get a diagnosis.

She said: & # 39; I had to resign because the side effects of three times sepsis are just too strong.

& # 39; I am constantly tired, I have constant joint pains, I have lost the feeling in my toes and I cannot solve simple problems or tasks as I used to.

& # 39; Every time I go to the toilet, I am terrified that I will get another UTI and die of sepsis. & # 39;

Mrs. Middour, a mother-and-one, added: & I could very easily have died all three times if I didn't recognize my sepsis sooner.

& # 39; Fortunately, I was at the right time at the right time when I was first diagnosed, because if I were in bed at home, this would have been the end of my story.

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& # 39; That's why I encourage everyone to get a better understanding of sepsis and how it can come from simple diseases such as a UTI. & # 39;

She rejected the symptoms as being due to hot flashes and nerves just to faint and discover that she had a UTI (pictured while she was connected to an IV line in intensive care)

She rejected the symptoms as being due to hot flashes and nerves just to faint and discover that she had a UTI (pictured while she was connected to an IV line in intensive care)

She rejected the symptoms as being due to hot flashes and nerves just to faint and discover that she had a UTI (pictured while she was connected to an IV line in intensive care)

Doctors who treated Ms. Middour in the emergency department warned that she had fallen into a septic shock (photo, the bruise on her arm due to an IV line)

Doctors who treated Ms. Middour in the emergency department warned that she had fallen into a septic shock (photo, the bruise on her arm due to an IV line)

Doctors who treated Ms. Middour in the emergency department warned that she had fallen into a septic shock (photo, the bruise on her arm due to an IV line)

Ms. Middour was hit again six months later in April 2016 by sepsis caused by a UTI, followed by her third near-death trial in January 2017
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Ms. Middour was hit again six months later in April 2016 by sepsis caused by a UTI, followed by her third near-death trial in January 2017

Ms. Middour was hit again six months later in April 2016 by sepsis caused by a UTI, followed by her third near-death trial in January 2017

WHAT IS SEPSIS?

Sepsis occurs when the body responds to an infection by attacking its own organs and tissues.

In the UK, around 44,000 people die of sepsis every year. Someone from the disease dies every 3.5 seconds worldwide.

Sepsis has symptoms similar to flu, gastroenteritis and a breast infection.

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These include:

  • Unclear speech or confusion
  • Extreme chills or muscle aches
  • Don't pee for a day
  • Severe shortness of breath
  • It feels like you're dying
  • Skin stained or discolored

Symptoms in children are:

  • Fast breathing
  • Fits or convulses
  • Spotted, bluish or pale skin
  • Skin rash that does not fade when pressed
  • idleness
  • Feeling abnormally cold

Among the five, repeated vomiting, no eating or no peeing can occur for 12 hours.

Anyone can develop sepsis, but it is most common in people who have recently had surgery, have a urinary catheter, or have been in the hospital for a long time.

Other risk people are people with a weak immune system, chemotherapy patients, pregnant women, the elderly and very young people.

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The treatment varies depending on the site of the infection, but includes antibiotics, IV fluids and oxygen if necessary.

Source: UK Sepsis Trust and NHS Choices

Sepsis occurs when the body responds to an infection by attacking its own organs and tissues.

In the UK, around 44,000 people die of sepsis every year. In the US, around 270,000 people are killed every year, figures suggest.

Recalling her first sepsis test, Mrs. Middour, who was connected to two IV lines, said: & I had taken my mother to the hospital to undergo surgery when I suddenly came across as very warm.

& # 39; But I thought it was just hot flashes. I was sick then, but I thought it would just be my nerves because of my mother's surgery. & # 39;

She revealed that she just kept blowing and waiting for her mother to be seen.

Her mother's nurse noticed that she was sweating and not looking well, and told her to go to the emergency room downstairs.

Mrs. Middour added: & # 39; But I didn't listen until I tried to get up and fall straight down.

& # 39; When I went downstairs, I gave urine samples, had all kinds of scans and was addicted to drip drops – and after a while I was told that I had a UTI that immediately gave me relief.

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& # 39; But a few hours later they told me that I was in septic shock and the next week I was still in the hospital fighting for my life. & # 39;

Six months after she was admitted home, Mrs. Middour was struck by the same symptoms.

She added: & # 39; When I entered the hospital, I was again diagnosed with sepsis. Again, I fought through sepsis before I was diagnosed with it again a year later. & # 39;

& # 39; This time I said goodbye to my family because I knew for sure that I couldn't be lucky a third time, but somehow I could.

& # 39; Every time it was as a result of a UTI – something that happens so often with so many women.

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Despite having survived the life-threatening condition three times, Ms. Middour still suffers from & # 39; post-sepsis syndrome & # 39 ;.

Post-sepsis syndrome is a condition that affects up to half of the survivors of sepsis and can affect organs such as the lungs, kidneys, and liver.

Psychologically, those who survive may suffer from insomnia, lively hallucinations and panic attacks, and impaired cognitive function.

WHAT IS A URINARY TRACT INFECTION (UTI)?

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) can affect various parts of your urinary tract, including your bladder (cystitis), urethra (urethritis) or kidneys (kidney infection).

Most UTIs can easily be treated with antibiotics.

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Symptoms of a UTI include:

  • have to pee suddenly or more often than usual
  • pain or a burning sensation when urinating
  • smelly or cloudy puddle
  • blood in your puddle
  • pain in your lower abdomen
  • feeling tired and unwell
  • in older people, behavioral changes such as severe confusion or agitation

Children with UTI & # 39; s can also:

  • generally seem unwell – babies can be irritated, do not eat well and have a high temperature of 37.5 ° C or higher
  • wet the bed or wet itself
  • deliberately hold their pee because it stings

Treat urinary tract infections (UTI & # 39; s)

Your doctor or nurse may prescribe antibiotics to treat a UTI.

Once you start treatment, the symptoms should disappear within five days in adults and 2 days in children.

If your UTI returns after treatment, you will usually be prescribed a longer course of antibiotics.

Things you can do yourself

Mild urinary tract infections (UTIs) often pass within a few days. To relieve pain while your symptoms disappear:

  • take paracetamol – you can give children liquid paracetamol
  • Place a jug on your stomach, back or between your thighs
  • rest and drink plenty of fluids – this helps your body to wash away the bacteria

It can also help to prevent sex until you feel better.

You cannot pass on a UTI to your partner, but sex can be uncomfortable.

Causes of urinary tract infections (UTI & # 39; s)

UTIs are usually caused by poo bacteria that invade the urinary tract.

The bacteria enter through the tube that transports puddle from the body (urethra).

Women have a shorter urethra than men. This means that bacteria reach the bladder or kidneys earlier and cause an infection.

Causes of UTI & # 39; s include:

  • pregnancy
  • disorders that block the urinary tract – such as kidney stones
  • conditions that make it difficult to completely empty the bladder – such as an enlarged prostate in men and constipation in children
  • urinary catheters (a tube in your bladder that is used to drain urine)
  • with a weakened immune system – for example from type 2 diabetes, chemotherapy or HIV

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