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Mother sparks debate online after asking whether upper class people are ruder than others

A woman has sparked a heated online debate after questioning whether middle-class people in the UK are getting bolder.

The unnamed woman took mumsnet to reveal that one of her close friends has become “righteous” and developed a “cold sense of smugness” since moving to an upscale neighborhood, and asked if it’s a common theme.

She got mixed reactions as some agreed that people who are better off generally have worse manners.

Others said that people can be rude regardless of their background, and that being rude is not a class issue, but rather how people are raised by their parents.

An unnamed woman went to Mumsnet to reveal that one of her close friends has become

An unnamed woman went to Mumsnet to reveal that one of her close friends has become “rude” and “righteous” since moving to a posh area, asking if it’s a common theme (stock image)

The woman explained that even her boyfriend's children seem to have more 'entitled' ones since moving to a 'conservative middle class' area.

The woman explained that even her boyfriend’s children seem to have more ‘entitled’ ones since moving to a ‘conservative middle class’ area.

The mother explained how she has noticed a change in her friend’s behavior since she moved.

“A good friend of mine moved quite recently to a very chic, conservative middle-class neighborhood,” she explained.

“And I’ve noticed over the past few years she’s gotten more abrupt and to me, just rude. Her kids are sweet and I’m close to them, but they’re also quite rude now and I dare say they’re justified.

Not intentionally, but hardly please and thank you, lots of “I want” instead of “may I have?”. The thing is, all the families I’ve interacted with in this area are all the same.

“It’s just the norm, but I find it really annoying. There’s always that cold feeling of smug and smugness.”

‘I think manners have generally declined in the UK and justice has increased, but in all classes, not just mid/high,’ replied one Mumsnet user.

Another echoed her sentiment, saying: ‘I think there is a general decline in manners across the board, driven by an increased sense of entitlement. When many people are challenged or run into a problem, their default setting seems to be hyper-aggression or a completely self-centered sense of indignation.”

But another agreed with her and said, “I see what you mean. The more “nicer” an area is (or is seen) the people seem to be more entitled and a bit stuck. Look down on people,” wrote another.

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People rushed to share their comments, arguing that there is a sense of rudeness among the middle class, claiming they don't say thank you for polite gestures and that their kids

People rushed to share their comments, arguing that there is a sense of rudeness among the middle class, claiming they don’t say thank you for polite gestures and that their kids “have a right too.”

A fellow commentator added that her daughter is a riding instructor in a “middle class/second hometown by the sea.”

“It’s especially the middle classes that are rude and demanding,” she said. ‘A wealthy local entrepreneur called my daughter at 10:10 PM last Saturday night to book lessons for her little darlings.

“A lot of people show up late, cancel within the hour of a lesson, arrive late to pick up their kids, and expect little Polly to gallop across the beach for her first lesson.

“She says that the less fortunate families/children generally behave better and listen to instructions.”

A fellow poster did the same with a similar story, saying they have a business in a ‘very nice part of London’.

“If you’re in London, it’s also around the corner from a place that’s not even half fun,” she said. “We get a wide mix of customers, generally the not-nice neighborhood hits are more polite and the locals largely have the right to w***ers.”

Interestingly, one Mumsnet user said she knows an academic who was researching this topic after seeing an increased middle class rudeness.

His thesis was that this generation was under more pressure to compete. At work, so many of us have goals and assessments,” she said. ‘We work longer and irregularly. Meetings are harder to get to due to traffic congestion and lack of parking.

“Kids want more ‘things’ and want to do more activities, horseback riding, paddle boarding and so on. The list continues.

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Some have argued that those who are really

Some have argued that those who are really “posh” don’t look down on others, while other commentators have argued that there is a general decline in manners and it has nothing to do with class

“It makes us impatient because we are being hindered in achieving our personal goals.”

In a strongly worded post, another wrote that “generally, the middle-class baby boomers and their entitled brat are without a doubt the rudest people to ever walk the face of the earth.”

“I have often been extremely polite and stepped off the curb in front of a family or held a door open for someone or let someone pass in front of me in a line, and I have not received any recognition that I am a living human being, let alone a thank you,” added another. “Because I’m quite petty, I find that calling them out with a loud ‘You’re welcome’ makes them feel ashamed – especially because I have a real middle-class vibe and voice of my own.”

Other commentators added that those who are really well off and can afford to be snobbish rarely are.

“They’re idiots. The saying money can’t buy you class is absolutely true. The real Toffs have unbelievably good manners,” one wrote.

Another added: ‘This is true. All the really chic, ‘old money’ types I’ve met have always been respectful and polite.’

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