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Shelina Begum held a vigil next to brain-damaged Tafida, five, started a new treatment in Italy after being flown there Tuesday night

Shelina Begum tenderly caresses the hair of her daughter Tafida and maintains vigilance after the brain-damaged five-year-old started a new treatment in Italy.

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In the past, Miss Begum sobbed with gratitude as she thanked Italian doctors for believing & # 39; in the recovery of her affected daughter.

Tafida, who was sent into a coma in February when a blood vessel burst in her brain, was flown to Italy on Tuesday evening. NHS doctors had declared that they had no hope of recovery and asked the Supreme Court to let the sanction die.

But two weeks ago, in a legal victory that stunned the medical profession, a judge chose the side of the family – citing "the sanctity of life" – and allowed them to take her to Gaslini Hospital in Genoa. Italian doctors told the family that Tafida could be home in Newham, East London "in a year's time."

Shelina Begum held a vigil next to brain-damaged Tafida, five, started a new treatment in Italy after being flown there Tuesday night

Shelina Begum held a vigil next to brain-damaged Tafida, five, started a new treatment in Italy after being flown there Tuesday night

Miss Begum said she no longer lives with the stifling fear that NHS doctors would turn her life support off. The locals in Genoa welcomed the family exceptionally after the case brought the national news of Italy.

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After Tafida's flight from Britain in a medically equipped jet, a traffic cop stopped her ambulance at the gates of the hospital to hand over a rose. Miss Begum and her husband Mohammed Raqeeb stood shoulder to shoulder with Italian doctors at an emotional press conference in the hospital to welcome them.

Miss Begum said she no longer lives with the stifling fear that NHS doctors would turn her life support off

Miss Begum said she no longer lives with the stifling fear that NHS doctors would turn her life support off

Miss Begum said she no longer lives with the stifling fear that NHS doctors would turn her life support off

Miss Begum said: "We want to thank the Gaslini for believing in the recovery of our daughter and the Italian public for the love and warm support they have shown us. The doctors in the UK believed from the first day that Tafida would not make it.

"We were constantly reminded that she would die the following week or the following day. They just didn't believe in Tafida. In Italy they believe in the recovery of Tafida. "

Miss Begum, whose 40th birthday is today, said: "An enormous weight has been lifted from our shoulders. We had the constant fear in the UK that they would withdraw treatment.

"That is not going to happen here. It just doesn't exist here. That's the big difference.

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"We saw her this morning and she was stable, awake and turned her head from left to right. I assured her that Mom and Dad are here. We look forward to improving her every day. & # 39;

Miss Begum & # 39; s lawyer broke and she wiped a tear when she told the Italian media: "Tafida was a very happy child. She was not born unwell. This thing just happened suddenly. I hope that she will come to some sort of recovery over time – and that is the day we are waiting for. & # 39; Outside in the 20 ° C sun, her 45-year-old building consultant beamed and added: & # 39; The sunshine tells a story. It is now up to Tafida. & # 39;

Paolo Petralia, director of the hospital – the equivalent of Italy on Great Ormond Street, said: "When the mother of Tafida wrote to us in June, we decided to help and I put together a working group of doctors with different specialties who studied her case .

"We have found a home where the family can live in the neighborhood. Everyone in the hospital – including the people in the city and the police – has asked what they can do to help.

Miss Begum and her husband Mohammed Raqeeb stood shoulder to shoulder with Italian doctors at an emotional press conference in the hospital to welcome them

Miss Begum and her husband Mohammed Raqeeb stood shoulder to shoulder with Italian doctors at an emotional press conference in the hospital to welcome them

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Miss Begum and her husband Mohammed Raqeeb stood shoulder to shoulder with Italian doctors at an emotional press conference in the hospital to welcome them

& # 39; When she arrived at the hospital, a traffic cop at the gate gave me a rose to give Tafida. & # 39;

Dr. Andrea Moscatelli, head of the neurological department, said that Tafida would undergo a tracheostomy operation and said: & The idea is to make life more comfortable for her – take the tubes out of her mouth and let her through a tube down her throat breathe, and through a tube to her belly. We will give her time to get well. The goal is to transfer her from intensive care to home care.

"We will teach the parents how to take care of her at home. We spoke with them very openly. Our assessment is exactly the same as the UK doctors, so we don't give them false hope. But what we can give them is time.

Miss Begum & # 39; s lawyer broke and she wiped a tear when she told the Italian media: "Tafida was a very happy child. She was not born unwell. This thing just happened suddenly & # 39;

Miss Begum & # 39; s lawyer broke and she wiped a tear when she told the Italian media: "Tafida was a very happy child. She was not born unwell. This thing just happened suddenly & # 39;

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Miss Begum & # 39; s lawyer broke and she wiped a tear when she told the Italian media: "Tafida was a very happy child. She was not born unwell. This thing just happened suddenly & # 39;

"After about & # 39; n brain injury, no one can tell her potential for recovery in just six months. You wait a year in the medical literature to see. The Tafida family finances its stay with public and private donations. They applied to become an Italian citizen, which would reduce their bills.

Their local lawyer, Filippo Martini, said: "After [the similar cases of] Charlie Gard and Alfie Evans, it was first decided that the best interest of a sick child would allow them to be treated in a European hospital."

He said that Alfie's father, Tom, was planning to visit Tafida in Italy.

Tafida was operated for seven hours after the blood vessel burst in her brain. She was given a 1 percent chance of survival before she went into a coma. She then got 24 hours to live but opened her eyes after two weeks.

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The family has raised around £ 35,000 from a £ 400,000 target to finance their costs.

. [TagsToTranslate] Dailymail