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Mother dies from caesarean section that went wrong just four days after threatening to expose ‘incompetent doctors’

A pregnant New York City woman died in childbirth just four days after threatening to expose ‘incompetent doctors’ at a local hospital for alleged abuse.

Amber Rose Isaac, 26, first tweeted her outrage at medical staff at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx on April 17.

“I can’t wait to share my experiences during my last two trimesters with incompetent physicians in Montefiore,” she wrote.

That would be Isaac’s last tweet before she died unexpectedly after a cesarean delivery that went wrong just after midnight on April 21.

She never had the chance to meet her newborn son, Elias, before bleeding before her platelet levels – which help blood clotting – drop dangerously.

She died alone, away from family and her partner, as New York hospitals have limited access amid the coronavirus pandemic.

Amber Rose Isaac (photo) expressed fear that she would die in childbirth before dying on April 21

Amber Rose Isaac (photo) expressed fear that she would die in childbirth before dying on April 21

In her latest tweet, she denounced the 'incompetent doctors' who allegedly abused her during her last two trimesters

In her latest tweet, she denounced the 'incompetent doctors' who allegedly abused her during her last two trimesters

In her latest tweet, she denounced the ‘incompetent doctors’ who allegedly abused her during her last two trimesters

Montefiore Medical Center is the same hospital where her mother worked for 25 years, but Isaac changed facility after feeling constantly scorned and abused by the staff of her original branch.

Although her allegations against Montefiore Medical Center have surfaced recently, Isaac had feared for months that she would fail delivery.

She said her partner and their child’s father, Bruce McIntyre III, that she had a dream that she would not survive the surgery.

“She told me she feels she’s not going to make it,” said 28-year-old McIntyre The city.

“And I would try my best to cheer her up. She would tell her mother that she is very happy that the baby is healthy, but she is afraid she will not make it. ‘

A mother’s pregnancy would be a good time, said McIntyre, who, according to Isaac, was marred by negligent, unprofessional and rude hospital staff.

Staff reportedly ignored Isaac – a black, Puerto Rican woman – even when she contacted them in the last few weeks.

“All this was 100% preventable. Everything, “he saidThe Guardian.

“I feel she would have been more attentive if she were a white mother, to be honest.”

Bruce McIntyre III (irght) said the death of Amber Rose Isaac (left) was '100% preventable'

Bruce McIntyre III (irght) said the death of Amber Rose Isaac (left) was '100% preventable'

Bruce McIntyre III (irght) said the death of Amber Rose Isaac (left) was ‘100% preventable’

Isaac (photo) changed facility at Montefiore Medical Center after feeling abused by staff

Isaac (photo) changed facility at Montefiore Medical Center after feeling abused by staff

Isaac (photo) changed facility at Montefiore Medical Center after feeling abused by staff

When Isaac learned that she was pregnant with her first child last year, she spent several months diving into information about maternal mortality.

While maternal mortality in the US lags behind others. likewise rich countries, black mothers are victims of abuse.

Black mothers died three to four times the height of their white counterparts.

And fear of Isaac’s safety worsened when her platelets began to drop in February.

Isaac, who was seven months pregnant at the time, “knew she needed to be seen,” but received no personal treatment from doctors during part of February and throughout March.

Instead, she was referred to online video conferences instead of office visits when the COVID-19 pandemic brutalized New York.

McIntyre, who often drove Isaac to her appointments, was unsure if she had blood tests in March.

After sending follow-up calls and emails requesting to see a doctor, Isaac finally made a face-to-face appointment in April.

At least five weeks had passed since she first noticed platelet issues and contacted medical staff.

On April 17, Isaac was admitted to Montefiore Medical Center after hearing that her platelet count had dropped again.

That morning she sent the heartbreaking tweet to hospital staff.

On April 20, Isaac discovered that day that she developed HELLP syndrome, a serious condition of high blood pressure and low platelet count that can complicate pregnancy.

Pictured: Montefiore Medical Center where Isaac died on April 21 after the birth of her first son

Pictured: Montefiore Medical Center where Isaac died on April 21 after the birth of her first son

Pictured: Montefiore Medical Center where Isaac died on April 21 after the birth of her first son

McIntyre (left) said doctors did not allow him into the delivery room during Isaac's birth because they administered general anesthesia

McIntyre (left) said doctors did not allow him into the delivery room during Isaac's birth because they administered general anesthesia

McIntyre (left) said doctors did not allow him into the delivery room during Isaac’s birth because they administered general anesthesia

Doctors caused labor for Isaac that same day.

McIntyre said he couldn’t stand by her side during Caesarean section because doctors had administered general anesthesia.

Some hospitals only allow medical personnel in delivery rooms where general anesthesia is used.

“They wouldn’t let me hug or kiss me because I was wearing masks and stuff. So I told her I loved her and we were going to get through this, “he said.

Nearby, McIntyre heard the sound of PA announcements calling on doctors to report to the delivery room and staff members running around.

“As soon as they took the baby out, her heart stopped,” said McIntyre. And she was bleeding out. Her platelets were so low that her blood was like water, so nothing clotted. ‘

Baby Elias, born more than a month early, is doing well, but is still in the hospital.

“It’s very hard to be in this house and imagine her here with us,” said McIntyre.

“She never met him. She never saw him. And she was so happy that she had it. ‘

The family has one GoFundMe to cover the cost of Elias’ care and Isaac’s funeral.

McIntyre created the 'JusticeforAmber' campaign to publicize maternal mortality

McIntyre created the 'JusticeforAmber' campaign to publicize maternal mortality

McIntyre created the ‘JusticeforAmber’ campaign to publicize maternal mortality

McIntyre said he and Isaac eventually wanted to open a daycare center to serve low-income families with limited options and income.

Isaac, who studied business development at Concordia College, hoped to graduate in May.

“She was treated very unfairly and that is why she died,” he said.

The unfair treatment Isaac is said to have undergone points to a greater problem with regard to black women and the health care system.

“In New York City, more than 3,000 women experience a life-threatening event during childbirth and approximately 30 women die each year from a pregnancy-related cause,” said a 2018 press release from Mayor Bill de Blasio’s office.

JeanBaptiste: 'There is always so much to say about birth while you are black, and now you have the whole birth while you are black during a pandemic scenario that unfolds'

JeanBaptiste: 'There is always so much to say about birth while you are black, and now you have the whole birth while you are black during a pandemic scenario that unfolds'

JeanBaptiste: ‘There is always so much to say about childbirth while you are black, and now you have the whole child while you are black during a pandemic scenario that unfolds’

“Preliminary data shows that black non-Hispanic women in New York City are eight times more likely to die of pregnancy-related complications than white women, much higher than the national average.”

Evelyn Alvarez, a native of Brooklyn and a co-founder of Black Magic Doulas, told The City that the inequalities black women face in public health appeared long before the current pandemic.

“As a person entering the hospital, you need to be assured of a certain standard of care,” she said.

“You have to feel comfortable when you feel that ‘I am confident that my provider will take care of me optimally’.”

But that’s not always the case, experts said.

“There is always so much to say about childbirth while you are black, and now you have the whole childbirth while you are black during a pandemic scenario that unfolds,” said Nicole JeanBaptiste, chief doula and founder of Sésé Doula Services.

“COVID-19 is absolutely exacerbating – and even exacerbating – this crisis,” she added.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists told physicians to be “aware of the unintended effect they may have, including limiting access to routine prenatal care.”

Medical personnel were advised to ‘maximize the use of telecare for as many aspects of prenatal care as possible’.

Dr. Aimee Mankodi, a maternity care director at the Institute for Family Health, told The City that telehealth was a “great option.”

But she added, “If you have a risky pregnancy, you should double up and try to move really fast, especially during COVID.”

“You can’t sit on a patient because of all the distractions and everything that happens.”

On April 20 – the day Elias was born – New York State announced that there would be a COVID-19 maternity task force.

This pandemic depressed our hospital system in a way that no one could have ever imagined, “said a statement.

The Task Force will explore how to set up childbirth centers as an alternative to childbirth in overwhelmed hospitals.

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