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Catherine Kelly realized that her son Edward was bad last summer after bumping into furniture and door frames
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Catherine Kelly realized that her son Edward was bad last summer after bumping into furniture and door frames

Catherine Kelly realized that her son Edward was bad last summer after bumping into furniture and door frames

A mother claims she knew her three-year-old son had a brain tumor months before he was finally diagnosed.

Catherine Kelly realized that her son Edward was bad last summer after bumping into furniture and door frames.

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Mrs. Kelly and husband Shaun suspected something was wrong when they noticed that his younger sister Edith was developing faster.

Pediatricians rejected her fear that it was a brain tumor and claimed that Edward had no neurological symptoms of a brain tumor.

Mrs. Kelly, from Holywell in Flintshire, persisted in finding a diagnosis and asked doctors to register him for a non-urgent MRI scan in November.

Edward was meanwhile sent to an ophthalmologist, who saw swelling behind his eyes, bringing the MRI forward.

Doctors discovered he had a medulloblastoma after the scan and was rushed to Alder Hey Children & # 39; s Hospital in Liverpool.

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Surgeons removed 98 percent of Edward & # 39; s brain tumor – which was cancer – during a 12-hour surgery the next day.

Mrs. Kelly and husband Shaun suspected something was wrong when they noticed his younger sister Edith developing faster (Edward and Mrs. Kelly are depicted with two brothers and sisters of Edward, Edith and Dylan)

Mrs. Kelly and husband Shaun suspected something was wrong when they noticed his younger sister Edith developing faster (Edward and Mrs. Kelly are depicted with two brothers and sisters of Edward, Edith and Dylan)

Mrs. Kelly and husband Shaun suspected something was wrong when they noticed his younger sister Edith developing faster (Edward and Mrs. Kelly are depicted with two brothers and sisters of Edward, Edith and Dylan)

Mrs. Kelly recalled the first symptoms of Edward and said that his balance was getting bad and he started down the stairs on his back.

The mother of five told it The Daily Post: & # 39; I said I wanted to get a credit card and pay privately to have it tested.

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& # 39; He ran poorly, but the pediatrician said he had no neurological symptoms of a tumor. & # 39;

Mrs. Kelly added: & # 39; People should trust their instinct because Edward didn't have the classic signs and symptoms. & # 39;

She admitted that she was terrified when doctors said that Edward had a medulloblastoma, which is striking

Mrs. Kelly said: & Shaun had to go home because the other kids were in the after-school club. I literally had to go in the ambulance with what we had with us.

& # 39; I broke tears in the parking lot for a second, then accelerated my head and arranged childcare for the next day. & # 39;

Mrs. Kelly, from Holywell in Flintshire, persisted in finding a diagnosis and asked doctors to book him for a non-urgent MRI scan in November (Edward is pictured with Dylan and Edith)
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Mrs. Kelly, from Holywell in Flintshire, persisted in finding a diagnosis and asked doctors to book him for a non-urgent MRI scan in November (Edward is pictured with Dylan and Edith)

Mrs. Kelly, from Holywell in Flintshire, persisted in finding a diagnosis and asked doctors to book him for a non-urgent MRI scan in November (Edward is pictured with Dylan and Edith)

Recalling Edward's first symptoms, Mrs. Kelly said his balance was getting bad and he began to shuffle down stairs on his backside (Mr. Kelly is pictured with Edward)

Recalling Edward's first symptoms, Mrs. Kelly said his balance was getting bad and he began to shuffle down stairs on his backside (Mr. Kelly is pictured with Edward)

Recalling Edward's first symptoms, Mrs. Kelly said his balance was getting bad and he began to shuffle down stairs on his backside (Mr. Kelly is pictured with Edward)

WHAT IS A BRAIN TUMOR?

A brain tumor is a cell growth that multiplies in an abnormal, uncontrollable way.

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They are more common in adults, but children are sometimes affected.

In the UK, more than 9,000 people are diagnosed with brain tumors every year.

Tumors can be cancer or not, with tumors generally growing and spreading faster.

Common symptoms include seizures, vomiting, sleepiness, personality changes, and severe, persistent headache.

Their cause is unknown, but previous cancer patients and people exposed to radiation are more at risk.

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Treatment varies, but may include steroids, surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy.

What are the warning signs?

  • Persistent or repeated vomiting
  • Persistent or recurring headache
  • Balance / coordination problems / walking problems
  • Blurred or double vision
  • Poor balance and coordination
  • Abnormal eye movements
  • Abnormal main position
  • Seizures or seizures
  • Behavior changes, especially fatigue
  • Increasing head circumference in babies & # 39; s

Source: NHS Choices

She revealed that when she asked the surgeon if her boy would return, he & # 39; yes & # 39; said, reassuring her that Edward would come through.

Doctors revealed that it was aggressive, high-quality growth and the rest needed intensive chemotherapy to beat it.

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Edward suffered an attack and needed a shunt in his head to drain fluid that had accumulated due to the location of the tumor.

However, the procedure failed within 24 hours and had to be repaired. He also got an infection afterwards.

Kelly, a 45-year-old telecom engineer, claimed that Edward was blind for 36 hours, blaming doctors for the trauma of an operation.

He was reported to have sepsis, and at a certain stage doctors claimed they had used all the antibiotics available to them.

Mrs. Kelly added: & # 39; It was terrible … That was for me when I honestly thought he might not recover. I can't believe how frightening it was. & # 39;

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Edward's condition improved and he spent Christmas with Alder Hey, after having undergone three operations in four days.

The couple alternated for Edith, who is now almost two years old, and their five-year-old son Dylan or watching over Edward.

He survived six rounds of debilitating chemotherapy, leaving him in hospital for six consecutive days for seven months, as well as 33 blood transfusions.

In May, Edwards had injections of his own stem cells – harvested before chemo – to supplement his own disease-fighting blood cells.

Edward was home at the end of May and called the cancer-free bell in Alder Hey on August 19 (Mr. and Mrs. Kelly are pictured with their daughter Edith)

Edward was home at the end of May and called the cancer-free bell in Alder Hey on August 19 (Mr. and Mrs. Kelly are pictured with their daughter Edith)

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Edward was home at the end of May and called the cancer-free bell in Alder Hey on August 19 (Mr. and Mrs. Kelly are pictured with their daughter Edith)

Mrs. Kelly said: & # 39; It was like a blood transfusion – within 20 minutes. He had it twice and they called it & # 39; liquid gold & # 39 ;. & # 39;

Edward's white blood cell count increased, which means that his body was stronger and more able to fight infection.

Edward was at the end of May and called the cancer-free bell in Alder Hey on August 19.

He returned to the nursery last week – but will be confronted with regular scans over the next five years to ensure that the brain tumor does not return.

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& # 39; It's luck, pure and simple, & # 39; said Mrs. Kelly. & # 39; Cancer does not discriminate. We have to bring Edward home and so many families are being denied. & # 39;

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