Mother and her disabled son, 3, live in her car after ‘landlord nearly doubled rent to $800’

The mother of a disabled three-year-old has shared how she faces life in her car after her landlord nearly doubled her rent and then began eviction proceedings — before the CDC issued a new eviction ban.

A moratorium on evictions that would not force millions of people out of their homes expired on Saturday, and the Biden administration rushed to issue another extension on Tuesday.

Before the extension went into effect, Sheryl Chavez, 39, said she was given 30 days to vacate her eight-year-old home in rural Edenton, North Carolina after her landlord decided to raise the rent from $450 a month to $500 per month. 825.

Chavez, a former correctional sergeant with the Pasquotank Correctional Institution, says mass migration to the area of ​​urban COVID-19 hotspots in the past 18 months has pushed rents to prohibitive levels.

She shares the home with her boyfriend, Lefein Noel, 29, and son Allister, 3, who was born with severe damage to his nervous system.

“I feel hurt and scared,” Chavez told DailyMail.com. ‘I rented from this lady for 8 years just to have her slip a letter into my mailbox. I don’t know where to go if I have to leave.

“Being kicked out of your house like it doesn’t matter is very painful, not because of rent, but just to make money in the great housing market.

“Due to the housing shortage and demand for housing, landlords across the region are evicting their tenants and putting the houses up for sale for much more than their value.”

Chavez says she risks living out of her car with her son if she can’t find affordable housing nearby.

In Edenton, North Carolina, Sheryl Chavez, 39, (pictured) was given 30 days to vacate her eight-year-old home after her landlord decided to unexpectedly raise the rent from $450 a month to $825.

In Edenton, North Carolina, Sheryl Chavez, 39, (pictured) was given 30 days to vacate her eight-year-old home after her landlord decided to unexpectedly raise the rent from $450 a month to $825.

Chavez, a former Correctional Sergeant for Pasquotank Correctional Institution, shares the home with her boyfriend, Lefein Noel, 29, and son Allister, 3, (pictured) who was born with severe damage to his nervous system.

Chavez, a former Correctional Sergeant for Pasquotank Correctional Institution, shares the home with her boyfriend, Lefein Noel, 29, and son Allister, 3, (pictured) who was born with severe damage to his nervous system.

Chavez, a former Correctional Sergeant for Pasquotank Correctional Institution, shares the home with her boyfriend, Lefein Noel, 29, and son Allister, 3, (pictured) who was born with severe damage to his nervous system.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday extended the moratorium on eviction by 60 days, a move that risks being challenged in court and admits President Joe Biden may not be constitutional.

CDC Director Rochelle Walensky signed an order which determined that “evictions of tenants for failure to pay rent or housing could harm public health measures” to slow the spread of COVID, the agency announced.

The order extends the deportation moratorium until October 3 and applies to counties experiencing “substantial and high levels” of COVID transmission.

The order gives more time “to further increase vaccination coverage,” the CDC said, calling it an “effective public health measure.”

“This moratorium is the right thing to do to keep people at home and out of the area where COVID-19 is spreading,” Walensky said. “Such mass evictions and the associated public health consequences are very difficult to reverse.”

It will cover about 90 percent of the country’s tenants, White House officials said.

More than 15 million people live in households that owe as much as $20 billion to their landlords, according to the Aspen Institute.

According to the US Census Bureau’s Household Pulse Survey, on July 5, about 3.6 million people in the US said they would face eviction in the next two months.

It is not yet known whether the new expansion will affect Chavez and her family — or other tenants who faced eviction proceedings Monday and Tuesday.

In Columbus, Ohio, Chelsea Rivera, 27, appeared in Franklin County court Monday after receiving an eviction notice last month.

Rivera, a single mother of three, is $2,988 in arrears in rent and late fees for the one-bedroom apartment she shares with her young sons.

Rivera told The Associated Press that she started struggling after her hours were reduced in May at the Walmart warehouse where she worked.

She has asked for help from numerous agencies, but they are out of money, have a waiting list or cannot help until clients come to court with an eviction notice.

Rivera said she is mentally preparing to go to a shelter with her children.

In Columbus, Ohio, Chelsea Rivera, 27, (pictured) showed up in Franklin County court Monday after receiving an eviction notice last month.  Rivera, a single mother of three, is $2,988 in arrears in rent and late fees for the one-bedroom apartment she shares with her young sons.

In Columbus, Ohio, Chelsea Rivera, 27, (pictured) showed up in Franklin County court Monday after receiving an eviction notice last month.  Rivera, a single mother of three, is $2,988 in arrears in rent and late fees for the one-bedroom apartment she shares with her young sons.

In Columbus, Ohio, Chelsea Rivera, 27, (pictured) showed up in Franklin County court Monday after receiving an eviction notice last month. Rivera, a single mother of three, is $2,988 in arrears in rent and late fees for the one-bedroom apartment she shares with her young sons.

“We just need help,” she told The Associated Press, fighting back tears. “It’s just been really hard with everyday problems and worrying about where you’re going to live.”

In another case, Luis Vertentes, 43, was told by a judge he had three weeks to vacate his one-bedroom apartment in nearby East Providence.

Vertentes, a landscaper, said he was four months behind on rent after being in hospital for a while.

“I’m going homeless, all because of this pandemic,” Vertentes said. “I feel helpless, like I can’t do anything, even though I work and have a full-time job.”

In Miami, Florida, Antoinette Eleby, 42, expects an eviction notice within weeks after her landlord refused federal aid to pay $5,000 in back rent.

She sends her five children to live with her mother in another county.

“My biggest concern is that now that I have an eviction, how am I going to find another place? Some places will accept you and some won’t,” said Eleby, whose entire family contracted COVID-19 earlier this year.

In another case, Luis Vertentes, 43, was told by a judge he had three weeks to vacate his one-bedroom apartment in nearby East Providence.

In another case, Luis Vertentes, 43, was told by a judge he had three weeks to vacate his one-bedroom apartment in nearby East Providence.

In another case, Luis Vertentes, 43, was told by a judge he had three weeks to vacate his one-bedroom apartment in nearby East Providence.

President Joe Biden was under intense pressure from his party’s liberal wing to do something to help tenants suffering from the pandemic. The White House had referred the matter to Congress and the states after a Supreme Court ruling in June decided to avoid additional executive action.

But Biden said Tuesday he has spoken with several constitutional scholars and will see if the new announcement will be “passed through the constitution.”

“Most of the constitutional science says it probably won’t go through the constitutional set, number one. But there are several leading scientists who think it can be done, and it’s worth it,” he said.

But, Biden noted, the order will “probably give some extra time” to get the housing assistance funds flowing.

The Supreme Court should probably issue a new ruling on new orders from the CDC.

Biden said Tuesday that he has spoken with several constitutional scholars and will see if the new announcement will be “passed through the constitution.”

The distribution of rent assistance granted by Congress in December and March has been painfully slow. The $47 billion Emergency Rental Assistance program has paid out just $3 billion to date.

But the Democrats expressed hope that the new order would buy time for that money to flow.

“This brand-new moratorium will give the money allocated by Congress time to flow as it helps stop the spread of the virus that is exacerbated by the delta variant and protects families and landlords,” President Nancy Pelosi said in a statement.

Homeless shelters braced themselves for a surge in people following the mortar, putting even more pressure on local shelters, already busy helping thousands of homeless people.

“We’ve had a lot of people come in and come to us and say, ‘I’ve never had to deal with this. I don’t even know where to start; I didn’t have to ask for help,” Nicole Anderson, director of social services at Catholic Charities of Southern Nevada, told 8 News Now.

The charity operates 16 programs and provides daily support to more than 4,200 people. They told 8 News Now they are prepared for the evictions.

“If we get an influx of people, we’ll be ready,” Anderson said. “And if it comes in small droves, then we’re ready for that too.”

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