Mother, 42, incorrectly diagnosed with food poisoning on vacation has brain hemorrhage

A mother says she is & # 39; happy to live & # 39; after doctors on vacation rejected her brain haemorrhage as food poisoning.

Caroline Johnson was with her family in Mallorca when she had to go to bed with a headache that felt like a & # 39; blow & # 39; against the head.

The 42-year-old, who initially thought it had been heat stroke, withdrew into her hotel room with pain and began to vomit.

The hotel reception called a doctor when Mrs. Johnson's headache became too much at 4 o'clock in the morning.

The doctor reportedly said she had a deadly stomach caused by food poisoning – and Mrs. Johnson didn't think about it anymore.

But back in the UK – and a week after the symptoms started – she collapsed and was quickly taken to the hospital.

Scans showed that she had had a subarachnoid hemorrhage – a type of stroke caused by a brain burst. Doctors rushed her to an emergency operation.

Caroline Johnson was with her family in Mallorca when she had to go to bed with a headache that felt like a & # 39; tap & # 39; against the head (pictured with her two sons Jay, nine and Kye, six)

Caroline Johnson was with her family in Mallorca when she had to go to bed with a headache that felt like a & # 39; tap & # 39; against the head (pictured with her two sons Jay, nine and Kye, six)

But back in the UK - and a week after the symptoms started - she collapsed and was quickly taken to the hospital. Scans showed that she had had a subarachnoid hemorrhage - a type of stroke caused by a brain burst (pictured in the hospital)

But back in the UK - and a week after the symptoms started - she collapsed and was quickly taken to the hospital. Scans showed that she had had a subarachnoid hemorrhage - a type of stroke caused by a brain burst (pictured in the hospital)

But back in the UK – and a week after the symptoms started – she collapsed and was quickly taken to the hospital. Scans showed that she had had a subarachnoid hemorrhage – a type of stroke caused by a brain burst (pictured in the hospital)

A year later, the former housekeeper from Sheffield returns to the same hotel in Mallorca to celebrate & # 39; life.

Mrs. Johnson said: & # 39; It was incredible that I survived a haemorrhage for seven days. The doctors said that would not have been the case.

& # 39; I did nothing unusual. I just enjoyed a wonderful vacation away from England with my husband and children. & # 39;

She added: & I sneaked in to go to the beach when I felt a slap on the back of my head – or something.

& # 39; The doctor said the headache was probably just food poisoning – which is super serious, though, but not what it turned out to be.

& # 39; I was wrongly diagnosed at every point, so all I could trust to have myself checked was that I and I knew my body. & # 39;

Mrs. Johnson started to get symptoms around 7 o'clock in the afternoon on June 7 last year and lay down in her room at Cala Ferrera Hotel.

Her husband Phillip, 46, took care of their two sons Jay, nine and Kye, six, while she was resting in the hotel room.

A year later, the former housekeeper from Sheffield returns to the same hotel in Mallorca to celebrate & # 39; life & # 39; (pictured with husband Phillip for her brain haemorrhage)

A year later, the former housekeeper from Sheffield returns to the same hotel in Mallorca to celebrate & # 39; life & # 39; (pictured with husband Phillip for her brain haemorrhage)

A year later, the former housekeeper from Sheffield returns to the same hotel in Mallorca to celebrate & # 39; life & # 39; (pictured with husband Phillip for her brain haemorrhage)

Mrs. Johnson began to get symptoms around noon on June 7 last year and lay down in her room at Cala Ferrera Hotel (pictured with her husband)

Mrs. Johnson began to get symptoms around noon on June 7 last year and lay down in her room at Cala Ferrera Hotel (pictured with her husband)

Mrs. Johnson began to get symptoms around noon on June 7 last year and lay down in her room at Cala Ferrera Hotel (pictured with her husband)

Mrs. Johnson was surprised that her symptoms could be food poisoning, but she no longer thought of his & # 39; hasty decision & # 39; (pictured with their sons and family friend Akbar)

Mrs. Johnson was surprised that her symptoms could be food poisoning, but she no longer thought of his & # 39; hasty decision & # 39; (pictured with their sons and family friend Akbar)

Mrs. Johnson was surprised that her symptoms could be food poisoning, but she no longer thought of his & # 39; hasty decision & # 39; (pictured with their sons and family friend Akbar)

She said: & # 39; The sunlight caused so much pain that I could only call at the reception. I remained vomiting and lying indoors. & # 39;

Around 4 o'clock the next day, Mrs. Johnson woke up with & # 39; feeling so sick & # 39; and asked the caretaker to send a doctor. & # 39; I thought I was dying, & # 39; she said.

When she described how she felt, the unidentified doctor made a false diagnosis of brain hemorrhage as a serious attack of food poisoning, she said.

Mrs. Johnson was surprised that her symptoms could be food poisoning, but she no longer thought of his & # 39; hasty decision & # 39; and paid him around £ 240.

The next day, on her journey back to the UK, her condition deteriorated and the ride from Gatwick to Sheffield & # 39; the longest of my life & # 39; used to be.

A few days later she was still sick and developed a double vision, but claims that she contacted opticians who sent her away.

The next day, during her trip back to the UK, her condition deteriorated and the ride from Gatwick to Sheffield & # 39; the longest of my life & # 39; wash (pictured with Kye)

The next day, during her trip back to the UK, her condition deteriorated and the ride from Gatwick to Sheffield & # 39; the longest of my life & # 39; wash (pictured with Kye)

The next day, during her trip back to the UK, her condition deteriorated and the ride from Gatwick to Sheffield & # 39; the longest of my life & # 39; wash (pictured with Kye)

She was transferred to the Royal Hallamshire Hospital and underwent a two-hour procedure in which small platinum coils closed off the aneurysm of the main artery (pictured with Phillip)

She was transferred to the Royal Hallamshire Hospital and underwent a two-hour procedure in which small platinum coils closed off the aneurysm of the main artery (pictured with Phillip)

She was transferred to the Royal Hallamshire Hospital and underwent a two-hour procedure in which small platinum coils closed off the aneurysm of the main artery (pictured with Phillip)

She was rushed to Northern General Hospital after she collapsed at a friend's house. A CT scan showed that she had a subarachnoid hemorrhage.

A blood vessel on the right side of her brain was swollen from an aneurysm, usually caused by high blood pressure or physical exertion or tension.

She was transferred to the Royal Hallamshire Hospital and underwent a two-hour procedure in which small platinum spirals occluded the aneurysm of the main artery.

Ms. Johnson was fired after 10 days in intensive care, but needs MRI scans every six months.

She stops working and says her recovery is & # 39; painful and slow & # 39; and that she is still having trouble talking.

But she said she felt blessed and happy to be alive, so the family is returning to the Cala Ferrera Hotel in Mallorca this month to celebrate & # 39; life.

WHAT IS A HEMORRAGE FOR THE SUBARRONNOID?

A subarachnoid hemorrhage is an unusual type of stroke that is caused by bleeding on the surface of the brain. It is a very serious condition and can be fatal.

Subarachnoid hemorrhage is responsible for approximately one in twenty strokes in the UK.

There are usually no warning signs, but a subarachnoid hemorrhage sometimes occurs during physical exertion or exertion, such as coughing, going to the toilet or lifting something heavy.

symptoms:

  • A sudden painful headache – which is often described as similar to a sudden blow to the head, resulting in a blinding pain as opposed to everything that was previously experienced
  • A stiff neck
  • Feeling and being sick
  • Sensitivity to light (photophobia)
  • Blurred or double vision
  • Stroke-like symptoms – such as unclear speech and weakness on one side of the body
  • Loss of consciousness or convulsions (uncontrollable shaking)

Treatment: A person with suspected subarachnoid hemorrhage needs a CT scan in the hospital to check for signs of bleeding in the brain.

If a diagnosis of subarachnoid hemorrhage is confirmed or strongly suspected, you will probably be transferred to a specialized neuroscience department.

Medication is usually given to prevent short-term complications and a procedure to restore the source of the bleeding can be performed.

Medical information via the NHS official website

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