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Hardly enjoying her new life, Milli has learned that her mother, Monica Smirk, has been diagnosed with breast cancer again.
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The mother of a 12-year-old girl who is recovering from a life-saving brain operation, accuses herself of passing on a gene to her daughters, making them susceptible to cancer.

& # 39; Miracle girl & # 39; Milli Lucas is in recovery for less than two weeks after Dr. Sydney-based surgeon. Charlie Teo operated on her malignant brain tumor.

Her mother Monica Smirk has just heard that her own cancer has returned and has opened herself up to the debilitating condition that occurs in her family.

The 47-year-old mother of three lives with a rare gene disposition known as Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS).

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Hardly enjoying her new life, Milli has learned that her mother, Monica Smirk, has been diagnosed with breast cancer again.

Hardly enjoying her new life, Milli has learned that her mother, Monica Smirk, has been diagnosed with breast cancer again.

& # 39; Miracle girl & # 39; Milli Lucas (pictured with mother Monica Smirk and father Grant Lucas) is in recovery for less than two weeks after the Sydney surgeon Dr. Charlie Teo performed surgery on a malignant brain tumor that other doctors found too risky to operate

& # 39; Miracle girl & # 39; Milli Lucas (pictured with mother Monica Smirk and father Grant Lucas) is in recovery for less than two weeks after the Sydney surgeon Dr. Charlie Teo performed surgery on a malignant brain tumor that other doctors found too risky to operate

& # 39; Miracle girl & # 39; Milli Lucas (pictured with mother Monica Smirk and father Grant Lucas) is in recovery for less than two weeks after the Sydney surgeon Dr. Charlie Teo performed surgery on a malignant brain tumor that other doctors found too risky to operate

Less than 1,000 people in the world sympathize, because the hereditary disease is transmitted through the family and the wearer is exposed to a lifelong risk of cancer.

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She confessed that she blamed herself for diagnosing her daughters and said that if she knew her condition before she was a mother, she would never have had children.

& # 39; It kills me every night, I fuck my eyes and look (Milli). I did that to her, it kills me every day, & she said.

In addition to Milli & # 39; s debilitating condition, her 15-year-old older sister, Tess, was also diagnosed with a brain tumor.

Amelia & # 39; Millie & # 39; Lucas (left), from Perth, was tragically diagnosed with an aggressive and malignant brain tumor in January 2016. Her sister Tess, 15, (right) also has the same brain tumor disorder but has since had it clear

Amelia & # 39; Millie & # 39; Lucas (left), from Perth, was tragically diagnosed with an aggressive and malignant brain tumor in January 2016. Her sister Tess, 15, (right) also has the same brain tumor disorder but has since had it clear

Amelia & # 39; Millie & # 39; Lucas (left), from Perth, was tragically diagnosed with an aggressive and malignant brain tumor in January 2016. Her sister Tess, 15, (right) also has the same brain tumor disorder but has since had it clear

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Mrs. Smirk's brother, niece and mother also had their own battles.

Three years ago, Smirk underwent a double breast amputation and hysterectomy.

But she recently heard that the cancer in her breast has returned and said her medical team isn't sure what to do, but we'll keep an eye on it.

& # 39; I can see it, it has not grown, so it can wait, but it will eventually have to be finished, & # 39; Mrs. Smirk said The Western Australian.

Milli said she does not blame her mother's condition for her own cancer diagnosis.

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The remark is merely a representation of the relentless power of the 12-year-old who laughed from her hospital bed less than 24 hours after her operation last week.

Every other surgeon who met Milli and her family had refused to operate based on the fact that the operation was risky and likely to leave her paralyzed or dead.

Every other surgeon who met Milli and her family had refused to operate based on the fact that the operation was risky and likely to leave her paralyzed or dead.

Every other surgeon who met Milli and her family had refused to operate based on the fact that the operation was risky and likely to leave her paralyzed or dead.

Every other surgeon who met Milli and her family had refused to operate based on the fact that the operation was risky and likely to leave her paralyzed or dead.

Dr. Teo said the type of tumor Milli had and the difficult location made the procedure for surgeons more precise, but she and her family knew the risks.

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& # 39; They (the family) know the risks, they know it is not healing and can reduce her quality of life, but they are just not ready to give up. It is a very brave decision, & he said.

He said that the life-changing procedure would hopefully improve Milli's quality of life and give her more time with her family.

Dr. Teo admitted that the procedure was one of the & # 39; more difficult & # 39; things he did in his career.

& # 39; It entered the brainstem, the no-go zone where most people don't work & he said.

Dr. Teo was able to remove 98 percent of the girl's tumors and referred her to specialists in Germany who are working to get rid of the remaining two percent.

Milli & # 39; s reaction to her mother is just a representation of the unswerving strength of the 12-year-old who laughed from her hospital bed less than 24 hours after her operation last week
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Milli & # 39; s reaction to her mother is just a representation of the unswerving strength of the 12-year-old who laughed from her hospital bed less than 24 hours after her operation last week

Milli & # 39; s reaction to her mother is just a representation of the unswerving strength of the 12-year-old who laughed from her hospital bed less than 24 hours after her operation last week

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