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Newborn Sophia & # 39; s & # 39; birthmark & ​​# 39; (photo) was & # 39; diagnosed & # 39; as a haemangioma tumor after her mother Amanda Dobbins posted a photo on Facebook for a new support group of their parents

A mother revealed how her newborn was & # 39; diagnosed & # 39; with a tumor that had ensured that she could become blind through a stranger on Facebook.

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Amanda Dobbins first noticed that her daughter Sophia had a small spot on the tip of her nose when she was only a few days old.

Reassured by doctors, it was just a birthmark, the 31-year-old got worried when the red spot began to grow.

Within a few days, the blemish left Sophia and looked like & # 39; she had received a bucket of blood over her head & # 39; and even covered her eyes.

Desperately, Mrs. Dobbins, from Cardiff, placed a photo of her daughter on a parent support group, where a stranger forced her to have Sophia tested for hemangioma.

Doctors later diagnosed the newborn with the tumor, causing a collection of small blood vessels to develop under the skin and may lead to blindness if an eye is affected.

After a year of treatment, the spot of Sophia has almost disappeared, with her being a happy, healthy fourteen month old.

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Newborn Sophia & # 39; s & # 39; birthmark & ​​# 39; (photo) was & # 39; diagnosed & # 39; as a haemangioma tumor after her mother Amanda Dobbins posted a photo on Facebook for a new support group of their parents

Newborn Sophia & # 39; s & # 39; birthmark & ​​# 39; (photo) was & # 39; diagnosed & # 39; as a haemangioma tumor after her mother Amanda Dobbins posted a photo on Facebook for a new support group of their parents

Sophia was later officially diagnosed and began a year of treatment at the Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital. She has recently been pictured, with her stain visibly reduced

Sophia was later officially diagnosed and began a year of treatment at the Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital. She has recently been pictured, with her stain visibly reduced

Sophia was later officially diagnosed and began a year of treatment at the Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital. She has recently been pictured, with her stain visibly reduced

Sophia & # 39; s mother and father Neil Dobbins (pictured together during the treatment of the newborn) & # 39; terrible to think & # 39; what could have happened if they had trusted doctors it was just a birthmark

Sophia & # 39; s mother and father Neil Dobbins (pictured together during the treatment of the newborn) & # 39; terrible to think & # 39; what could have happened if they had trusted doctors it was just a birthmark

Sophia & # 39; s mother and father Neil Dobbins (pictured together during the treatment of the newborn) & # 39; terrible to think & # 39; what could have happened if they had trusted doctors it was just a birthmark

Speaking of her daughter's condition, Mrs. Dobbins, a pharmacy technician, said: “It would have caused great damage.

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& # 39; Because of how fast it developed and how fast it grew if we hadn't treated it, while we did, it might have completely damaged the sight in its right eye.

& # 39; I think we were very lucky. I'm afraid to think what it might cause if we had just listened to the doctors. & # 39;

Mrs. Dobbins and her husband Neil noticed a small mark on Sophia's nose for the first time when she was three to four days old.

& # 39; First the doctors said it was a stork bite, because it was really pale pink before we left the hospital, it got a little darker, so they said it was a wine stain and that's where they left it, & # 39 ; she said.

The new parents became more and more concerned when the brand became bigger and redder.

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& # 39; It went from very pale pink to the appearance of someone pouring a jar of blood over her head, it was really swollen, it would bleed, & # 39; said Mrs. Dobbins.

The blemish even covered one of Sophia's eyelids, making it difficult for her to open that eye.

Sofia, depicted as a newborn baby, had only a small scratch on her nose

Sofia, depicted as a newborn baby, had only a small scratch on her nose

Over the next two weeks, the spot grew and became redder

Over the next two weeks, the spot grew and became redder

Jeroen, pictured on the left as a newborn baby, only had a scratch on her nose. Over the next two weeks, the spot grew and became redder (see right)

Sophia is pictured while receiving propranolol, which narrowed her blood vessels and prevented blood from flowing through her hemangioma
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Sophia is pictured while receiving propranolol, which narrowed her blood vessels and prevented blood from flowing through her hemangioma

Depicted is the worried message that her mother posted on Facebook

Depicted is the worried message that her mother posted on Facebook

Sophia is depicted on propranolol, making her blood vessels narrower and preventing blood from flowing through her hemangioma. On the right is her mother's troubled message

The new parents decided to post a picture of Sophia on Facebook to see if anyone had advice.

& # 39; A lady sent me a message: "I don't think it's a port wine stain, I think it's something called haemangioma," said Mrs. Dobbins.

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& # 39; It all depends on the location, but in the case of Sophia it was very close to her eye and could affect her vision. & # 39;

On the recommendation of the stranger, Ms. Dobbins contacted the Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital, which eventually led to Sophia being diagnosed.

& # 39; They told us they would start with propranolol, but we would have to stay in the hospital to be checked, & # 39; she said.

Propranolol narrows the blood vessels of a patient, reducing the amount of blood that flows through a hemangioma. This prevents the & # 39; stain & # 39; grows and shrinks.

& # 39; The drug affects her sleep, you have to be very careful with the dosage because it can affect blood sugar and blood pressure, so you have to keep a constant eye on it, & # 39; said Mrs. Dobbins.

The red spot is shown not long after Sophia started treatment

The red spot is shown not long after Sophia started treatment

Within a year of medication, it gradually became paler (pictured), softer, and began to shrink

Within a year of medication, it gradually became paler (pictured), softer, and began to shrink

The red spot is shown on the left not long after Sophia started treatment. Within a year of medication, it gradually became paler (right), softer, and began to shrink

Medics reassured Sophia's parents that the spot (pictured in the early days) was just a birthmark, but it continued to grow

Medics reassured Sophia's parents that the spot (pictured in the early days) was just a birthmark, but it continued to grow

It even covered her eyelid, making it difficult for Sophia to open that eye (pictured). Untreated, this could have blinded her

It even covered her eyelid, making it difficult for Sophia to open that eye (pictured). Untreated, this could have blinded her

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Medics reassured Sophia & # 39; s parents that the spot (pictured left in the early days) was only a birthmark, but it continued to grow. It even covered her eyelid, making it difficult for Sophia to open that eye (pictured). Untreated, this could have blinded her

Sophia is pictured in the Great Ormond Street hospital that is being assessed before treatment is started

Sophia is pictured in the Great Ormond Street hospital that is being assessed before treatment is started

Her hemangioma is shown as shrinking and paler during treatment

Her hemangioma is shown as shrinking and paler during treatment

Sophia is pictured on the left in the Great Ormond Street hospital before treatment is started. Her hemangioma is shown with the correct shrinkage and becomes paler during treatment

A year later, Sophia responded well to the treatment.

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& # 39; We can't really remember her with the full birthmark – it's very strange, & # 39; said Mrs. Dobbins.

However, the parents still have to face cruel looks when they are out as a family, asking if Sophia falls over and hurts herself.

& # 39; We are just thankful that she is not old enough to understand that people are talking about her, & # 39; said Mrs. Dobbins.

& # 39; As she grows older, we want to teach her to appreciate it and to hear that it is part of who she is.

& # 39; And to know how much she experienced at such a young age without realizing it – she just doesn't know how strong she is. & # 39;

WHAT IS A HAEMANGIOMA?

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A hemangioma is a tumor that develops as a collection of small blood vessels under the skin.

Also known as strawberry characters, a hemangioma causes a raised, red area on the skin and a bluish swelling deeper below it.

Their cause is not fully known. There are indications that they can arise from placental tissue early in pregnancy.

About one in ten babies has hemangioma to some extent. They are more common in girls, premature babies, babies with low birth weight and multiple births, such as twins.

Most hemangiomas do not require treatment, but must be monitored because they can easily bleed if scratched.

Ulceration of hemangiomas may require treatment, along with which obstructs or forms the airways on the eyes or lips.

Painkillers and antibiotics can be offered if the stain is infected.

The beta blocker propranolol can also be given. This narrows blood vessels, preventing blood from nourishing the hemangioma & # 39 ;. Over time, the stain becomes paler, softer, and shrinks.

Untreated, hemangiomas in the eye can distort vision and those on the lips can make feeding painful.

Source: Great Ormond Street Hospital

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