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Annie Jenkins is pictured at the age of 27 after applying a stoma bag to try to alleviate her diverticular disease affecting the intestinal wall

A mother whose weight dropped to only 5th (70lbs) is happy that she became 1st (14lbs) after a life-changing operation to remove part of her gut.

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Annie Jenkins, from Penzance, Cornwall, was diagnosed with diverticular disease – which affects the gut wall – when she was 22 years old.

As the disease progressed, the 30-year-old was reportedly left with a completely paralyzed colon, which occurs when the intestine is inactive.

Mrs. Jenkins, mother of 11-year-old Deano, dropped to a small size 4 when her body could no longer absorb nutrients and huge amounts of medication eliminated her appetite.

Although spectators complimented her slender figure, Jenkins longed to be a healthy figure and hated her from wearing children's clothes.

Since she had surgery in February to remove part of her gut, Mrs. Jenkins – now a size 8 – is overjoyed to finally arrive.

Annie Jenkins is pictured at the age of 27 after applying a stoma bag to try to alleviate her diverticular disease affecting the intestinal wall

But her illness then worsened, causing her weight to drop to just 5 pcs (70 lbs). Mrs. Jenkins is pictured at the age of 30
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But her illness then worsened, causing her weight to drop to just 5 pcs (70 lbs). Mrs. Jenkins is pictured at the age of 30

Annie Jenkins is pictured on the left at 27 after she has applied a stoma bag to try to alleviate her diverticular disease affecting the intestinal wall. But her disease then worsened, reducing her weight to only 5th (70lbs), seen from 30 years old

After enduring eight years of pain, Jenkins was forced to give up her job as a bartender and is worried about the example her 11-year-old son Deano (pictured together)

After enduring eight years of pain, Jenkins was forced to give up her job as a bartender and is worried about the example her 11-year-old son Deano (pictured together)

Jenkins, pictured after surgery, claims that she would take the pain of childbirth over her symptoms

Jenkins, pictured after surgery, claims that she would take the pain of childbirth over her symptoms

After having endured pain for eight years, Mrs. Jenkins had to quit her job as a bartender and worry about the example that her 11-year-old son Deano (left photo) shows. Immediately after surgery, she claims that she would take the pain of childbirth over her symptoms

Speaking of her condition, Mrs. Jenkins said: “I would have exchanged work for the pain I had every day.

& # 39; I had no choice but to take a medication cocktail to control my pain up to four times a day.

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& # 39; The only way I can describe the last eight years was as if I had the borrowers in my stomach and they are trying to get out.

& # 39; The medication and the constant pain greatly suppressed my hunger, I had completely lost my appetite, so I had to choose food here and there.

& # 39; I dropped to size four and had no choice but to buy clothes and underwear in the kids' section of stores because the adult sizes didn't fit. & # 39;

She added: & # 39; Shopping was a tough job because it was a shame if I had to look in the children's section. & # 39;

Although she hated her slender appearance, Jenkins was often complimented by her slender figure.

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& # 39; People would always say: & # 39; I wish I was skinny like you & # 39; or & # 39; you're so lucky you're skinny & # 39; but I wanted nothing more than to arrive, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; I am not lucky that I have no intestines and have been sick every morning with my head down the toilet for the past eight years. & # 39;

Mrs. Jenkins underwent ileostomy surgery to give her a stoma bag when she was 27.

However, her condition then deteriorated, forcing Jenkins to remove part of her gut earlier this year.

Surgery for diverticular disorders is usually only needed to remove an inflamed pouch if it is infected or if the inflammation spreads to the abdominal wall, known as peritonitis.

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& # 39; Since I had surgery in February, I have completely stopped taking all the medication, I can now eat anything and I am coming! & Said Jenkins.

Mrs. Jenkins hated her slender figure (pictured before she arrived) and was surprised when onlookers would compliment her for being thin & # 39; thin & # 39; used to be

Mrs. Jenkins hated her slender figure (pictured before she arrived) and was surprised when onlookers would compliment her for being thin & # 39; thin & # 39; used to be

Since she has undergone surgery to remove part of her gut, Mrs. Jenkins has regained her appetite and is able to properly absorb her food

Since she has undergone surgery to remove part of her gut, Mrs. Jenkins has regained her appetite and is able to properly absorb her food

Mrs. Jenkins hated her slender figure (pictured on the left before she arrived) and was surprised when onlookers complimented her that she & # 39; thin & # 39; used to be. Since the operation to remove part of her gut, Mrs. Jenkins (pictured here) has regained her appetite and can absorb her food

Jenkin's eight-year struggle against pain forced her to quit her job as a bartender.

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& # 39; I tried to work whenever I can to show my son that you have to work for your money, no matter how sick you are, & # 39; she said.

Now without pain, Mrs. Jenkins' ordeal inspired her to become a stoma nurse who takes care of patients with a colostomy, ileostomy or urostomy.

& # 39; I wanted to study in my twenties, but my illness made me too unreliable. I hope my most recent operation means I can live my life & # 39 ;, she said.

& # 39; I am 30 without a career, the last eight years have destroyed my soul, but now that I feel at my best, nothing stops me anymore. & # 39;

Along with continuing to arrive, Mrs. Jenkins hopes to complete the Kernow Killer obstacle course in Cornwall in October for Colostomy UK.

She also wants to climb Ben Nevis next year.

Jenkins, pictured on vacation, hopes that her operation will allow her & # 39; to live & # 39;

Jenkins, pictured on vacation, hopes that her operation will allow her & # 39; to live & # 39;

Jenkins is portrayed at the age of 27 before her condition became so severe that she was forced to take painkillers up to four times a day

Jenkins is portrayed at the age of 27 before her condition became so severe that she was forced to take painkillers up to four times a day

Jenkins, pictured on the left on vacation, hopes that her operation will allow her to "live" & # 39 ;. Jenkins is portrayed at the age of 27 before her condition became so severe that she was forced to take painkillers up to four times a day. She describes it as & # 39; The borrowers in her belly & # 39;

Ms. Jenkins is pictured shortly after her ileostomy surgery, which allowed her stools to be collected outside of her body

Ms. Jenkins is pictured shortly after her ileostomy surgery, which allowed her stools to be collected outside of her body

Jenkins is now slightly larger and hopes to arrive further
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Jenkins is now slightly larger and hopes to arrive further

Mrs. Jenkins is pictured on the left after her ileostomy operation, which allowed her stools to be collected outside of her body. Now slightly larger (right), she hopes to gain more weight

WHAT IS DIVERTICULAR DISEASE?

Diverticular disease occurs when pouches form on the lining of the colon.

The pouches occasionally occur in the small intestine and in rare cases elsewhere in the intestine.

The condition affects between 30 and 50 percent of people in the Western world, but around 75 percent never develop symptoms.

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Diverticular disease is caused when there is a weakness in the muscle of the intestinal wall.

This causes the inner layer to push through and form a bag.

Patients with diverticular disorders usually do not eat enough fiber, making their stools hard and small instead of soft and bulky.

This means that the intestine has to work harder to push the stools.

And these contractions create high pressure in the intestine, which gradually weakens its lining.

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Symptoms are usually:

  • Lower abdominal pain
  • Bloated feeling
  • Bowel changes – diarrhea or constipation
  • Mucus or blood in the stool

Untreated, diverticular disease causes an infection in approximately 10 to 25 percent of patients.

This happens when a piece of hard stools gets stuck in one or more of the bags.

Scar tissue can also form around an inflamed pouch, which narrows the colon and can lead to a blockage.

If a bag bursts, this can lead to the serious peritonitis condition – inflammation of the thin layer of tissue in the abdomen.

In non-serious cases, treatment is usually focused on eating fiber-rich foods such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.

Medication can also be prescribed to relieve stool.

Surgery is usually only necessary if the abdomen is infected or there is widespread inflammation of the colon.

The operation usually involves removing the part of the intestine with an affected pouch.

Source: Guts VK

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