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Most complained about ads in Australia: how KFC ad and Ultra Tune ad infuriated the country

From a woman ‘adjusting her cleavage’ for beckoning schoolboys to Pamela Anderson and Warwick Capper’s Baywatch-style beach walk: Australia’s most lamented ads, named and shamed

  • Ad standards revealed the most complained about ads in Australia
  • An Ultra Tune ad featuring Pamela Anderson topped the list of 309 complaints
  • KFC was second for their ad with a young woman adjusting her cleavage

A TV commercial in which a busty woman is laughed at by school-age boys while adjusting her plunging neckline and a Pamela Anderson tape ad were the most accused of ads for the first half of this year.

The Ad Standards watchdog has complained most in the past six months about ads in Australia, which were all about the seemingly humiliating image of women on television.

An Ultra Tune Australia ad featuring Baywatch-style Pamela Anderson and Warwick Capper topped the list of 309 complaints.

Fast food giant KFC came in second with 187 complaints about an ad in which a young girl looked in a car window to adjust her ‘cleavage’ when the window rolls down – alone, revealing a mother and her shocked sons .

Fast food giant KFC came in second with 187 complaints over an advertisement in which a young woman looked in the window of a car to adjust her 'cleavage' when the window turns down and a mother and her two sons are revealed

Fast food giant KFC came in second with 187 complaints over an advertisement in which a young woman looked in the window of a car to adjust her ‘cleavage’ when the window turns down and a mother and her two sons are revealed

The ad received numerous complaints due to their portrayal of sexuality, nudity, exploitative or demeaning scenarios, and the discrimination or defamation of women

The ad received numerous complaints due to their portrayal of sexuality, nudity, exploitative or demeaning scenarios, and the discrimination or defamation of women

The ad received numerous complaints due to their portrayal of sexuality, nudity, exploitative or demeaning scenarios, and the discrimination or defamation of women

Both advertisements received numerous complaints because of their portrayal of sexuality, nudity, exploiting or demeaning scenarios and the discrimination or slander of women.

However, all complaints against the two advertisements were rejected by the regulator.

Ultra Tune is regularly on the ad standards list because of the style of television commercials.

But KFC owner Yum! Restaurants apologized somewhat after the ad caused an online backlash.

“We apologize if someone was offended by our latest commercial,” the company said in a statement.

“It was not our intention to place women and young boys in a negative light.”

KFC also placed third and fourth on the list with the most complaints about ads – the first time a company made three different places.

The third ad depicted an awkward moment when a boy while in bed tells a girl he loves her and she replies ‘thank you’.

It received 66 complaints for being sexual, exploitative, demeaning and discriminating against women.

The fourth ad showed a student who took an exam and sees his friends outside with KFC and says ‘bucket’ as he leaves the exam to join his friends.

This advertisement received 41 complaints for the use of foul language and because it was discriminatory and burdensome against the main character.

An Ultra Tune Australia ad featuring Pamela Anderson and Baywatch-style Warwick Capper topped the list and received 309 complaints

An Ultra Tune Australia ad featuring Pamela Anderson and Baywatch-style Warwick Capper topped the list and received 309 complaints

An Ultra Tune Australia ad featuring Pamela Anderson and Baywatch-style Warwick Capper topped the list and received 309 complaints

Collective Shout, a grassroots campaign against the objectification of women, the sexualization of girls, led campaigns against the Ultra Tune and KFC ads.

Campaigns Manager for Collective Shout, Melinda Liszewski, said the self-regulated advertising industry is harming community interests.

Ad Standards creates the illusion of regulation. But as his own ‘most complained’ list shows, humiliating sexist ads are not regulated. They are really endorsed, ”said Liszewski.

“Even if complaints are assigned, there are no penalties for non-compliance.”

In all, complaints were filed through June 30, 1747, with community concerns about 206 advertisements being assessed on one or more issues.

Of the advertisements listed, 14 were removed from the broadcast, with advertisers choosing to change or remove the content that received the complaints.

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