MOST Australians under 30 think endless lockdowns are WORSE than Covid itself

Half of Australians under 30 now believe the extended lockdowns in Sydney and Melbourne are worse than Covid itself.

Australians across all age groups want the border to remain closed to foreigners and are angry with return travelers coming back from coronavirus hotspots, a CoreData Research survey for Daily Mail Australia found.

NSW Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian has hinted that the Sydney lockdown, which began on June 26, could be extended until September, as new daily cases of the more contagious Indian Delta variant remain stubbornly in the triple-digit range.

To make matters worse, Australia comes last of the wealthier OECD countries in vaccine rollouts, with only 15 percent of over 16s fully vaccinated.

Half of Australians under 30 (pictured are women in Sydney's Bondi) now believe the extended lockdowns in Sydney and Melbourne are worse than Covid itself

Half of Australians under 30 (pictured are women in Sydney’s Bondi) now believe the extended lockdowns in Sydney and Melbourne are worse than Covid itself

This is well below the 70 percent level Prime Minister Scott Morrison said would be needed to ease lockdowns.

Australians will not be allowed to travel abroad for a holiday until at least mid-2022 and in Sydney it is illegal to allow anyone to visit your home or exercise outdoors with more than one other person.

Why young Australians hate lockdowns the most

Those under 30 most disapprove of lockdowns, with about half, or 49.4 percent of those surveyed, believing the social and economic impacts are worse than the health impacts of Covid itself, according to an online survey from July among 1,231 people.

Andrew Inwood, founder and chief executive of CoreData Research, who is also a behavioral economist, said younger people were more likely to work in precarious, service-oriented jobs and especially resented missing out on the social interactions that are an essential part of youth.

“The ability to meet people has been absolutely destroyed,” he told the Daily Mail Australia.

“Loneliness has increased significantly.”

Why Australians want to keep the border closed

As for the ban on foreigners, a majority of people across all age groups want Australia to keep the border closed to non-citizens and non-residents, continuing a policy introduced in March 2020 at the start of the pandemic.

Those in their 50s were most intent on keeping Australia closed: 78.5 percent in this age group supported an ongoing border closure after the federal government’s stated mid-2022 date, compared with 53 percent of those in their thirties and 57.5 ​​percent. percent of young people under the age of 30.

Australians across all age groups want the border closed to foreigners and are angry with return travelers coming back from coronavirus hotspots, a CoreData Research survey for Daily Mail Australia found (pictured are returning international travelers in Melbourne)

Australians across all age groups want the border closed to foreigners and are angry with return travelers coming back from coronavirus hotspots, a CoreData Research survey for Daily Mail Australia found (pictured are returning international travelers in Melbourne)

Australians across all age groups want the border closed to foreigners and are angry with return travelers coming back from coronavirus hotspots, a CoreData Research survey for Daily Mail Australia found (pictured are returning international travelers in Melbourne)

Mr Inwood said there was an element of fear as Australians reacted to a situation they perceived as beyond their control, with the more contagious Delta tribe from India sparking fear.

“It’s kind of racism, but it’s a proxy in their minds for security,” he said.

“We tend to ask for more restrictions, we tend to prefer those things because it’s a proxy to solve the problem and create someone else who caused the problem.

“It’s looking for a suitable scapegoat.”

What is Aussies to blame for the lockdowns?

Across all age groups, the slow rollout of vaccinations sparked the most anger, with 31.6 percent blaming it for the lockdowns.

Across all age groups, the slow vaccination rollout (pictured is the Sydney nurse getting a Pfizer shot) sparked the most anger with 31.6 percent blaming it for the lockdowns

Across all age groups, the slow vaccination rollout (pictured is the Sydney nurse getting a Pfizer shot) sparked the most anger with 31.6 percent blaming it for the lockdowns

Across all age groups, the slow vaccination rollout (pictured is the Sydney nurse getting a Pfizer shot) sparked the most anger with 31.6 percent blaming it for the lockdowns

As for the ban on foreigners, a majority of people across all age groups want Australia to keep the border closed to non-citizens and non-residents, continuing a policy introduced in March 2020 at the start of the pandemic

As for the ban on foreigners, a majority of people across all age groups want Australia to keep the border closed to non-citizens and non-residents, continuing a policy introduced in March 2020 at the start of the pandemic

As for the ban on foreigners, a majority of people across all age groups want Australia to keep the border closed to non-citizens and non-residents, continuing a policy introduced in March 2020 at the start of the pandemic

While many people had a rational view of the benefits of vaccines, a large proportion of people are hesitant to take an AstraZeneca shot, despite the death rate of only one in 2.5 million.

‘The only effective treatment for this is vaccination. There isn’t any degree of locking that will do things, it’s not a solution, it just pushes it further down the pipeline,” Mr Inwood said.

‘Not being vaccinated, we know that, is risky behaviour. The selfishness, which we also covered, came to the fore here, because the reality is that most people think that people who don’t get vaccinated are selfish because they are passing the cost and risk onto someone else.’

A similar percentage, or 31.3 percent, blamed Australians for being allowed to fly home from virus hotspots, even though the national cabinet halved the arrival limit to 3,035 on July 2.

A further 25.5 percent blamed the New South Wales government for the moderate lockdown announced on June 26, which allowed all shops except gyms to trade.

To make matters worse, Australia comes last of the wealthier OECD countries in vaccine rollouts, with only 15 percent of over 16s fully vaccinated.  Sean Langcake, chief economist at BIS Oxford Economics, said Australians will be subject to a rapid or extended lockdown until Christmas at current vaccination rates.

To make matters worse, Australia comes last of the wealthier OECD countries in vaccine rollouts, with only 15 percent of over 16s fully vaccinated.  Sean Langcake, chief economist at BIS Oxford Economics, said Australians will be subject to a rapid or extended lockdown until Christmas at current vaccination rates.

To make matters worse, Australia comes last of the wealthier OECD countries in vaccine rollouts, with only 15 percent of over 16s fully vaccinated. Sean Langcake, chief economist at BIS Oxford Economics, said Australians will be subject to a rapid or extended lockdown until Christmas at current vaccination rates.

Only 11.6 percent blamed a lack of purpose-built quarantine hubs like the one in Howard Springs near Darwin.

How long can the lockdowns last?

Sean Langcake, chief economist at BIS Oxford Economics, said current vaccination rates will subject Australians to a quick or extended lockdown until Christmas.

“The roll-out of the vaccine in Australia is still ongoing. But at the current rate, it will take until the end of the year for 70 to 80 percent of the adult population to be fully vaccinated,” he said.

“We do not expect a return to the relaxed trade and travel conditions of early 2020 until this threshold is reached.”

While many people had a rational view of the benefits of vaccines, a large proportion of people are hesitant to take an AstraZeneca shot, despite the death rate of only one in 2.5 million.

While many people had a rational view of the benefits of vaccines, a large proportion of people are hesitant to take an AstraZeneca shot, despite the death rate of only one in 2.5 million.

While many people had a rational view of the benefits of vaccines, a large proportion of people are hesitant to take an AstraZeneca shot, despite the death rate of only one in 2.5 million.

Those under 30 most dislike lockdowns, with half, or 49.4 percent of them, believing the social and economic impacts are worse than the health impacts of Covid itself, according to July's online survey of 1,231 people

Those under 30 most dislike lockdowns, with half, or 49.4 percent of them, believing the social and economic impacts are worse than the health impacts of Covid itself, according to July's online survey of 1,231 people

Those under 30 most dislike lockdowns, with half, or 49.4 percent of them, believing the social and economic impacts are worse than the health impacts of Covid itself, according to July’s online survey of 1,231 people

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