Most Americans prefer protection of the LGBTQ community against discrimination. Vermont is the most gay-friendly

Most Americans prefer protection of the LGBTQ community against discrimination with Vermont, the most gay-friendly, and Arkansas least, but support is declining, study finds

  • Approximately 69% of Americans support the protection of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people against discrimination
  • The majority support extended to all major religions and almost every demographic group – Unitarians were the most supportive (90%), while Jehovah & # 39; s Witnesses were the least (53%)
  • The strongest falls were among Republicans, whose support fell to 56% in 2018, compared to 61% in 2015

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A majority of Americans in every state are in favor of policies that protect LGBTQ people against discrimination, according to a new survey.

Vermont was the most pro-LGBTQ state, with 77 percent of residents supporting such protection, while Arkansas was last with 56 percent for preventing discrimination.

In general, 69 percent of Americans support wide-ranging non-discrimination protection for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transsexual people, according to the 2018 survey of more than 2,000 Americans by the Public Religion Research Institute.

This map illustrates the percentage of Americans in every state who support protection against discrimination for LGBTQ people. The darker the shades of blue show wider acceptance, while the lighter shades of green indicate resistance to such protections

This map illustrates the percentage of Americans in every state who support protection against discrimination for LGBTQ people. The darker the shades of blue show wider acceptance, while the lighter shades of green indicate resistance to such protections

The majority support extends to all major religions and almost every demographic group. Unitarians were the most supportive (90 percent), while Jehovah & # 39; s Witnesses were the least (53 percent).

& # 39; I still think this is quite remarkable in the current polarized climate to say that there is bipartisan, interfaith support for an issue, and much less an issue such as LGBT rights, one that is historically controversial & # 39; PRRI CEO Robert Jones told NBC News.

& # 39; And to say that in all 50 states there is also majority support for that policy & # 39; is significant, he added.

However, overall support fell slightly in 2018 compared to 2015, when 71 percent of all Americans supported LGBT issues.

The strongest declines were among Republicans, whose support dropped 5 percentage points to 56 percent in 2018, compared to 61 percent in 2015.

Support for protecting LGBTQ people against discrimination has remained relatively stable, with a slight decline in general and among Republicans and independents, according to new research data

Support for protecting LGBTQ people against discrimination has remained relatively stable, with a slight decline in general and among Republicans and independents, according to new research data

Support for protecting LGBTQ people against discrimination has remained relatively stable, with a slight decline in general and among Republicans and independents, according to new research data

"Particularly among Republicans, this fall in support is concentrated among those who showed the largest support for LGBT protection just a few years ago," the report said.

Older republicans were the most likely anti-LGBTQ sentiments, with only 48 percent of the over-65s in favor of protection for that population and 42 percent against it.

& # 39; There are fewer liberal republicans today than in 2015 and fewer younger republicans than in 2015, & # 39; Jones told NBC. & # 39; (Young Republicans) have moved to the independent category. & # 39;

& # 39; If you are a liberal republican or a republican younger than 30, you might feel out of step & # 39 ;, he added.

Age was a factor between religions and political parties. For example, 63 percent of white Evangelical Protestants between the ages of 18 and 29 said they support protection against discrimination for LGBTQ people, while only 45 percent of those over 65 felt the same way.

Researchers have also asked Americans how they feel about small businesses that refuse to serve LGBTQ people based on their religious beliefs.

In general, 57 percent of Americans oppose such discrimination, although 55 percent of white Evangelical Protestants and 54 percent of Mormons were in favor of allowing it.

This chart divides the proportion of Americans into all major religions that offer protection to LGBTQ people

This chart divides the proportion of Americans into all major religions that offer protection to LGBTQ people

This chart divides the proportion of Americans into all major religions that offer protection to LGBTQ people

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