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Most Americans believe that coronavirus is a “threat,” but that the US “does enough” to prevent it from spreading

Most Americans believe that coronavirus is a “real threat”, but trust that the US is doing enough to prevent its spread by limiting travel and creating quarantine, a new poll reveals

  • 56% say they are “concerned” or “very concerned” about the spread of coronavirus in the US.
  • Americans aged 45 or over were more worried about the virus than young people younger than 45
  • 61% say they believe the US government is doing enough to prevent the corona virus from spreading
  • The US Department of Foreign Affairs has issued a level 4 – Travel non-warning and foreign nationals who have been to China for the past two weeks cannot enter the US
  • More than 20,500 people worldwide have been infected – 11 in the US – and 427 people have died

Most Americans say they are worried about the deadly corona virus that is spreading from China, but believe the US government is “doing enough” to curb it.

In a new Marist / NPR / PBS NewsHour survey, 56 percent of respondents say they are “concerned” or “very concerned” about the spread of the infection across the country.

Moreover, 66 percent said they considered the disease a “real threat” and not “out of proportion.”

However, six in 10 Americans believe that the Trump administration and federal health authorities are doing enough to prevent the virus from spreading, including the imposition of travel restrictions and quarantine for Americans evacuated from the epicenter of the virus.

In a new poll, 56% of Americans said they are “concerned” about the deadly corona virus that is spreading through the US

The survey was conducted between January 31 and February 1 among more than 800 American adults.

The results show that Americans aged 45 or over are much more anxious about the possible spread of coronavirus compared to younger generations.

While 57 percent of adults under the age of 45 consider the outbreak to be a real risk, the percentage has risen to 72 years among those aged 45 and over.

And although most adults were concerned about the spread in the US, they are less worried about reaching their respective neighborhoods.

About 55 percent said they were not worried about the spread of coronavirus to their individual communities.

“People are generally concerned, but not necessarily about their community,” Dr. said. Lee Miringoff, director of the Marist Institute for Public Opinion. NPR.

“And so far, the only people diagnosed in the US have been to the region in China where the virus was first discovered, or in close contact with people who have returned from China.”

Since the outbreak in December 2019, more than 20,500 people worldwide have been infected with the corona virus.

All 427 deaths – apart from two – have occurred in China, mostly in the city of Wuhan, where the virus originated.

There are 11 confirmed cases in the US, including six in California, two in Illinois and one in Arizona, Massachusetts and Washington.

Two-thirds of Americans say they believe the US government is doing enough to prevent the virus from spreading

Two-thirds of Americans say they believe the US government is doing enough to prevent the virus from spreading

Two-thirds of Americans say they believe the US government is doing enough to prevent the virus from spreading

Although most Americans say they are worried, 61 percent of respondents say the government is doing enough to prevent the virus from spreading.

Last week, the US Department of Foreign Affairs issued a level 4 – Non-warning trip to China, the highest travel warning the agency can give.

In addition, anyone who has traveled in China in the last 14 days is visited by 11 American airports for screening.

The 195 Americans who have been evacuated from Wuhan are currently also under a mandatory 14-day quarantine.

And this week new rules from the Trump government came into force, except for foreigners who have been in China for the last two weeks to enter the US.

However, this excludes immediate family members of US citizens or permanent residents as well as citizens from Hong Kong or Macao.

“A majority of Americans do not see this as something that will necessarily strike here,” Dr. Miringoff told NPR.

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