Morrison becomes the FIRST UK supermarket to offer plastic-free fruits and vegetables

Morrison becomes the FIRST UK supermarket to offer plastic-free fruits and vegetables in an effort to produce less waste

  • Follows a ten-month trial at three Morrison stores in Skipton, St Ives and Guiseley
  • As a result, consumption of loose fruit and vegetables increased on average by 40 percent
  • Comes weeks after Greenpeace has claimed the need of Tesco and Sainsbury to do more

Morrisons becomes the first British supermarket to roll out plastic free fruit and vegetable zones in many of its stores.

Customers can choose from up to 127 types of fruit and vegetables – and purchase them separately or put them in recyclable paper bags.

The move follows a ten-month trial period at three Morrisons stores in Skipton, Guiseley and St Ives, where the volume of fruit and vegetables sold separately increased by 40 percent on average.

It is expected that the new & # 39; bagless & # 39; shelves with fruit and vegetables are expected to save an estimated amount of three tons per week, which corresponds to 156 tons per year.

Every little bit helps: the new & # 39; bagless & # 39; shelves for fruits and vegetables are expected to save an estimated amount of three tons of plastic per week, which equals 156 tons per year

Every little bit helps: the new & # 39; bagless & # 39; shelves for fruits and vegetables are expected to save an estimated amount of three tons of plastic per week, which equals 156 tons per year

This is Morrison's latest announcement – making changes that remove 9,000 tons of unnecessary or problematic plastic every year.

This figure includes 174m plastic products bags removed from fruit and vegetable aisles, and 600 tons of non-recyclable polystyrene removed from branded products for food and beverages.

Another 1,300 tons of plastic will be removed due to the launch of paper carrier bags this month.

The individual fruit and vegetable areas will be rolled out in 60 Morrisons stores in the course of 2019. They will then be introduced as part of the ongoing national supermarket store renewal program, saving even more plastic over time.

The range of loose vegetables contains daily necessities such as carrots, potatoes and onions, but also more unusual seasonal varieties such as celeriac. Fruit includes apples, pears and oranges, plus figs, press mimons and pomegranates.

Drew Kirk, Director of Fruit and Veg at Morrisons, told MailOnline: & # 39; Many of our customers would like the opportunity to purchase their fruit and vegetables separately. So we make a part of our vegetable shop without plastic where they can pick as much or as little as they want.

Impact: in the course of 2019, the individual fruit and vegetable areas will be rolled out in 60 Morrisons stores. They will then be introduced as part of the supermarket's ongoing national store renewal program - saving even more plastic over time

Impact: in the course of 2019, the individual fruit and vegetable areas will be rolled out in 60 Morrisons stores. They will then be introduced as part of the supermarket's ongoing national store renewal program - saving even more plastic over time

Impact: in the course of 2019, the individual fruit and vegetable areas will be rolled out in 60 Morrisons stores. They will then be introduced as part of the supermarket's ongoing national store renewal program – saving even more plastic over time

& # 39; We are going back to using traditional greengrocers and we hope customers appreciate the choice. & # 39;

The plastic reduction initiatives of Morrisons are described in detail in the Responsibility Review of 2018-19. The evaluation also indicates that the group has reduced CO2 emissions by 45 percent since 2005.

The news comes just weeks after Greenpeace complained that Tesco and Sainsbury & # 39; s – two of the & # 39; Big Four & # 39; supermarkets – have not done enough to remove plastic from their aisles.

Sainsbury & # 39; s has previously pledged to reduce plastic by just 77 tonnes since last January by removing plastic packaging from gift vouchers.

Meanwhile, Tesco reports that he has removed only a million pieces of plastic from the stores by phasing plastic straws from the cafes.

Both supermarkets have made different commitments to address the plastic threat, although they cannot say how many tons or pieces of plastic they will remove.

Criticism: the news comes just weeks after Greenpeace complained about Tesco and Sainsbury & # 39; s - two of the & # 39; Big Four & # 39; supermarkets - did not do enough to remove plastic from their aisles

Criticism: the news comes just weeks after Greenpeace complained about Tesco and Sainsbury & # 39; s - two of the & # 39; Big Four & # 39; supermarkets - did not do enough to remove plastic from their aisles

Criticism: the news comes just weeks after Greenpeace complained about Tesco and Sainsbury & # 39; s – two of the & # 39; Big Four & # 39; supermarkets – did not do enough to remove plastic from their aisles

WHAT ARE ASDA'S PLANS TO DESIGN THEIR FRUIT AND VEG?

Asda announced in August 2018 that it was plastic swinging on the Swedes.

Extensive shelf life tests have shown that the shelf life of the packed or unpackaged root vegetables is minimal, according to the company.

Customers should not see any difference in the quality of their turnip, or the freshness, they say.

The company is researching other fruits and vegetables to see if the same results can be achieved.

Asda says the tests show that removing the plastic packaging of some fruits and vegetables can drastically shorten shelf life and increase food waste.

For example, unpacked cucumbers lose three times more weight than wrapped due to dehydration, leading to rubbery, yellowing cucumbers that are more susceptible to rotting and mold.

Similarly, red and white cabbage are susceptible to moisture loss when the plastic shrink film is removed, resulting in a shortened shelf life of about two to three days and ultimately a product of inferior quality.

Asda also works with experts from Leeds Beckett University to find usable alternatives to plastic in the long term.

But compared to other Big Four supermarkets, Asda and Morrisons, they have set up fewer strategies to tackle plastic and have not been able to process plastic cutlery in stores or bring paper bags for products.

Elena Polisano, ocean campaigner for Greenpeace UK, said: As the two largest supermarkets, Sainsbury's and Tesco have the largest plastic footprint and should take responsibility for it.

& # 39; But they are behind rather than leading the way and neither have set the much needed targets for plastic reduction.

& # 39; Tesco has at least some measures in the pipeline, including a trial with loose fruit and vegetables and a forthcoming trial with refillable packaging.

& # 39; And it has promised to phase out some problem plastics this year.

& # 39; But Sainsbury & # 39; s is the worst in its class and needs to reduce plastic urgently – starting with eliminating unnecessary and non-recyclable plastic by 2020. & # 39;

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