More than half of Americans turn into ‘Zoom Zombies’ when they get behind the wheel

0

Are You a ‘Zoom Zombie’ ?: More than half of Americans who drive a car shortly after video chats are distracted report being distracted – and Gen Z is the most dangerous group, a study finds.

  • About 54% of Americans turn into ‘Zoom Zombies’ while driving
  • This group would video chat just before getting behind the wheel
  • A survey of 1,819 Americans found that using a phone is the biggest distraction
  • However, 65% of respondents identified as Generation Z.

A new analysis reveals that the coronavirus pandemic has created a group of potentially dangerous zombies – ‘Zoom Zombies’ that is to say.

According to the Root Insurance Distracted Driving Awareness Survey, about 54 percent of Americans who drive shortly after video chatting report trouble concentrating on the road.

The biggest distraction is using a phone to multitask: 65 percent of Gen Z respondents and 61 percent of millennials say they are on a device – this is down to 48 percent under Gen X.

These Zoom zombies are suffering from a new phenomenon known as ‘Zoom Fatigue’, a term used to describe the exhaustion that comes with participating in video conferencing.

Scroll down for video

A new analysis reveals that the coronavirus pandemic has created a group of potentially dangerous zombies - 'Zoom Zombies' that is to say.  About 54 percent of Americans who drive shortly after video chatting report problems concentrating on the road

A new analysis reveals that the coronavirus pandemic has created a group of potentially dangerous zombies – ‘Zoom Zombies’ that is to say. About 54 percent of Americans who drive shortly after video chatting report problems concentrating on the road

Using such platforms requires an inordinate amount of eye contact, reduced mobility, and cognitive overload, which is now being transferred to the real world.

The coronavirus took over the world in 2020, trapping millions of people in an effort to limit the spread of the virus.

Many companies closed their physical offices, forcing employees to set up a workspace from home and perform tasks using video conferencing platforms

And Zoom seemed to be leading the way pretty quickly – the company said it saw 200 million daily meeting attendees by March 2020.

The biggest distraction is using a phone to multitask: 65 percent of Gen Z respondents and 61 percent of millennials say they are on a device - this is down to 48 percent under Gen X

The biggest distraction is using a phone to multitask: 65 percent of Gen Z respondents and 61 percent of millennials say they are on a device - this is down to 48 percent under Gen X

The biggest distraction is using a phone to multitask: 65 percent of Gen Z respondents and 61 percent of millennials say they are on a device – this is down to 48 percent under Gen X

While it will be a year of lockdown for many worldwide, most people still work from home feeling the exhaustion that turns them into potentially dangerous Zoom zombies on the road.

What causes ‘Zoom Fatigue’?

1. Excessive amounts of close eye contact is very intense

2. It is exhausting to constantly see yourself in real time during video chats

3. Video chats significantly reduce our usual mobility

4. The cognitive load is much higher with video chats

Alex Timm, founder and CEO of Root Insurance, said: “COVID-19 has fundamentally changed the way we interact with our car.

“With many abruptly switching to a virtual environment, Americans’ reliance on technology increased dramatically along with their screen time, leading a majority of drivers to incorporate this distracted behavior into their vehicles.”

The study, which was a collaboration with Wakefield Research, was conducted among 1,819 Americans in the US from March 12 to March 17, 2021.

All drivers, who were over 18 years old, were asked a series of questions via an online survey.

In total, almost two-thirds of drivers (64%) indicate that they check their phone while driving.

This is an increase of 2 percent compared to 2020 and an increase of 6 percent compared to 2019.

However, the amount of time people check their device while driving has seen a starling spike.

The survey found that 53 percent check their phone within 15 minutes of driving – a seven percent increase from last year and a nine percent increase from 2019.

Even more troubling, many drivers are comfortable with this level of distraction. Almost a third (30 percent) of drivers believe they can be safe while using their mobile phone, an increase of 6 percentage points from 2020 (24 percent).

Advertisement