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More than a quarter of 18 to 25-year-olds are unaware that women should avoid alcohol during pregnancy

More than a quarter of 18 to 25-year-olds don’t know that women should avoid alcohol during pregnancy, research shows

  • Research among 2,000 British people assessed knowledge of fetal alcohol disorders
  • A quarter of the young people did not know that a pregnant woman should not drink
  • Nearly half (49 percent) of 18 to 25-year-olds surveyed said they received information about alcohol during pregnancy through social media

A quarter of adults between the ages of 18 and 25 don’t know that women shouldn’t drink alcohol during pregnancy, according to a study of 2,000 British people.

As many as 26 percent admitted they didn’t know that official guidelines state that a woman should avoid alcohol altogether when pregnant.

Only 17 percent of young adults correctly identified exposure to alcohol in the womb as harmful to a baby in the long term than other substances such as heroin.

Only 26 percent of 18-25 year olds were aware that according to official guidelines, a woman should avoid alcohol completely when pregnant (supply)

Only 26 percent of 18-25 year olds were aware that according to official guidelines, a woman should avoid alcohol completely when pregnant (supply)

Nearly half (49 percent) of the 18-25 year olds surveyed said they received information about alcohol during pregnancy through social media, while four in ten discussed it with a teacher.

The study was conducted by the National Organization for FASD (Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders).

Sandra Butcher, general manager of the UK branch of the National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS-UK) said, “Information is power. It is very worrying that so few young people are aware of the dangers.

Nearly half (49 percent) of 18-25 year olds surveyed said they received information about alcohol during pregnancy through social media, while four in 10 discussed it with a teacher (stock)

Nearly half (49 percent) of 18-25 year olds surveyed said they received information about alcohol during pregnancy through social media, while four in 10 discussed it with a teacher (stock)

Nearly half (49 percent) of 18-25 year olds surveyed said they received information about alcohol during pregnancy through social media, while four in 10 discussed it with a teacher (stock)

Pregnant women should avoid alcohol or harm their child

Pregnant women should not drink alcoholic beverages because the chemical can get into their baby’s body.

The liver is one of the last organs to finish growing in the womb, so babies exposed to alcohol may not have natural defenses against the damage – in adult humans, the liver filters it to reduce damage.

Drinking during the first trimester can increase the risk of miscarriage, premature birth, or low birth weight.

While drinking later in pregnancy increases the chances of the baby being born with health problems.

Babies of mothers who regularly drink during pregnancy can develop a serious condition called fetal alcohol syndrome.

This can cause physical deformities (in particular, the eyes can be set wide apart and a large forehead and a thin upper lip can develop), as well as disabilities.

Babies with severe fetal alcohol syndrome can have learning difficulties, behavioral problems, or even develop cerebral palsy.

According to the Mencap charity, around 6,000 to 7,000 babies are born each year in the UK with fetal alcohol syndrome.

Source: NHS

Alcohol exposure during pregnancy has a more lifelong impact on a developing brain and body than heroin. FASD is preventable – no alcohol, no risk. ‘

However, the study found that 22 percent were able to determine that the abbreviation FASD stands for Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.

FASD is the lifelong brain-based condition that can result from exposure to alcohol in the womb.

This can cause physical deformities (in particular, the eyes can be set wide apart and a large forehead and a thin upper lip can develop), as well as disabilities.

According to the Mencap charity, around 6,000 to 7,000 babies are born each year in the UK with fetal alcohol syndrome.

Babies with severe fetal alcohol syndrome can have learning difficulties, behavioral problems, or even develop cerebral palsy.

Studies have shown that FASD is more common than autism, but that it is widely misdiagnosed or undiagnosed.

Health and social care teacher Jo Buckard, an expert in FASD, said, “Progress has been made, but no one should be comfortable with these numbers.

“If a quarter of children in childbearing years don’t have the message yet, it could lead to a huge risk of FASD.

“Add to that that during this lockdown it is more difficult to access birth control and pregnancy tests, it is a perfect storm for a possible future revival of FASD.”

Sandra Butcher, General Director of NOFAS-UK, added: “We hope schools and community groups will support this initiative.

“Young people need to know why this matters.

“Adults have missed this goal for so long, we think once they have the facts, the next generation will be the one to prevent it, hidden epidemic.”

Fear of a spike in babies born with alcohol damage from coronavirus lockdown binge drinking

Women are urged to curb their drinking because of fears that this could lead to a spike in alcohol damage in babies conceived during the coronavirus pandemic.

A study by the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education recently found that Australians drank 70 percent more during isolation.

Professor Elizabeth Elliott of the University of Sydney said that, coupled with the increased time partners spent together, meant an increased risk of pregnancy and alcohol damage.

Professor Elliott said it was a myth that only high drinking speeds could cause problems, such as fetal alcohol syndrome.

Prenatal alcohol exposure can cause neurodevelopmental problems in children that can affect their ability to think, learn, focus and control their behavior and emotions.

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