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Tata Chemicals Europe organized an event at the site in Winnington, Cheshire to announce the project and announced financing for CO2 capture systems

More than 40,000 tons of carbon dioxide per year are extracted from the atmosphere and converted into eye drops, Pot Noodles and even BEER as part of the £ 22 billion UK project

  • A factory in Cheshire will catch the equivalent emissions of 20,000 cars in one year
  • A total of £ 22 million in government funding has been promised for carbon storage
  • Chemicals can be converted into products such as eye drops, beer and pot noodles
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A total of more than 40,000 tons of carbon dioxide can be removed from the atmosphere every year as part of a CO2 capture scheme.

A total of £ 22 million in government funding has been promised to help a number of schemes that extract greenhouse gas and other chemicals from the atmosphere.

It can then be converted into useful products such as eye drops, beer and pot noodles.

One plant in Cheshire will absorb the equivalent emissions of 20,000 cars in a year and is planned for 2021.

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Tata Chemicals Europe organized an event at the site in Winnington, Cheshire to announce the project and announced financing for CO2 capture systems

Tata Chemicals Europe organized an event at the site in Winnington, Cheshire to announce the project and announced financing for CO2 capture systems

Tata Chemicals Europe organized an event at the site in Winnington, Cheshire to announce the project.

When fully operational in 2021, it will be the largest carbon capture plant in the UK, removing 100 times more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere than the current largest plant in the country.

Minister for Energy and Clean Growth, Chris Skidmore, said: & # 39; Carbon capture, use and storage play an essential role in our efforts to tackle climate change, and help us realize our ambition to make our contribution to global warming to be fully terminated in 2050.

& # 39; If we want to become a net zero emissions economy and end our contribution to the greenhouse effect, innovative schemes such as Tata Chemicals & # 39; essential.

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& # 39; Their plans demonstrate the enormous potential of CCUS, reduce our emissions and help companies innovate and export products around the world.

It can then be converted into useful products such as eye drops, beer and pot noodles. One plant in Cheshire will absorb the equivalent emissions of 20,000 cars in a year and is planned for 2021

It can then be converted into useful products such as eye drops, beer and pot noodles. One plant in Cheshire will absorb the equivalent emissions of 20,000 cars in a year and is planned for 2021

It can then be converted into useful products such as eye drops, beer and pot noodles. One plant in Cheshire will absorb the equivalent emissions of 20,000 cars in a year and is planned for 2021

& # 39; The funding that the government is providing today puts the UK at the forefront of rolling out this technology and demonstrates how our clean growth strategy works for all parts of the country.

The UK has recently drawn up ambitious plans to be carbon neutral by 2050, making it one of the world leaders.

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A report was published focusing on securing the carbon produced and the carbon balance captured by 2050, and some recommendations included reducing meat, more electric cars and more carbon storage.

WHAT ARE THE UK PLANS FOR & # 39; NET ZERO & # 39; CARBON EMISSIONS?

Plans that the United Kingdom by 2050 & # 39; carbon neutral & # 39; were released by the government of Theresa May on June 12, 2019.

However, experts are concerned about how the proposals will work.

The report is committed to ensuring that UK-generated emissions are offset by removing the same amount of carbon from the atmosphere.

There are two main ways to achieve this – by planting more trees and by installing & # 39; carbon capture & # 39; technology at the source of the pollution.

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Some critics are concerned that this first option will be used by the government to export its CO2 compensation to other countries.

International carbon credits allow countries to continue to emit carbon while paying for trees to be planted elsewhere, thereby compensating for their emissions.

Some claim that the scheme is a way for developed countries to evade their environmental obligations by passing them on to poor and developing countries.

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