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The skeleton of a & # 39; tall man & # 39; was discovered by archaeologists in France in a burial mound among a series of monolithic stones believed to be 6,000 years old

The skeleton of a & # 39; tall man & # 39; was discovered by archaeologists in France in a burial mound among a series of monolithic stones believed to be 6,000 years old.

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Employees widening the A75 motorway near Veyre-Monton in central France made the first discovery and called in experts from the National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research (Inrap) to explore the site.

So far they have found 30 of the stone monuments, known as "menhirs", over an area of ​​approximately four hectares (1.6 hectares) and range in size from three to five feet (1 to 1.6 m).

Experts say that 30 tons of stone was used in the construction of the site – part of which was arranged in a horseshoe shape, similar to the famous Carnac standing stones in northwestern France.

The monoliths and cairns, which may have had religious or spiritual significance for their builders, were deliberately brought down – perhaps by a later culture with different beliefs, researchers say.

Archaeologists will continue to work on the site and expect to find more finds that they hope will shed light on the ancient past of France.

The skeleton of a & # 39; tall man & # 39; was discovered by archaeologists in France in a burial mound among a series of monolithic stones believed to be 6,000 years old

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The skeleton of a & # 39; tall man & # 39; was discovered by archaeologists in France in a burial mound among a series of monolithic stones believed to be 6,000 years old

Experts from the National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research (Inrap) were called in to explore the site and found more and more stones as they kept digging

Experts from the National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research (Inrap) were called in to explore the site and found more and more stones as they kept digging

Experts from the National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research (Inrap) were called in to explore the site and found more and more stones as they kept digging

Some of the menhirs are arranged in a straight line that extends for at least 450 feet (150 m) in a north-south direction, experts say.

Five large stones in the shape of a horseshoe are placed nearby, along with six regularly spaced blocks that form a circle with a diameter of 50 feet (15 m).

The cairn or burial mound is 52 feet (14 m) long and 20 feet (6.5 m) wide and has four sides and is made from clamped stone slabs, possibly from fallen or destroyed menhirs.

It is believed that the man found inside was buried in a wooden box or similar container that perished in the intervening years.

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Few indications have been found on the site that can definitively date the finds, some of which have been placed at different times in history.

More tests will be conducted to accurately date the various elements of the site, in particular the skeleton in the cairn.

So far, experts have found 30 of the stone monuments, known as "menhirs," covering an area of ​​approximately four hectares (1.6 hectares) and varying in size from three to five feet (1 to 1.6 m)

So far, experts have found 30 of the stone monuments, known as "menhirs," covering an area of ​​approximately four hectares (1.6 hectares) and varying in size from three to five feet (1 to 1.6 m)

So far, experts have found 30 of the stone monuments, known as "menhirs," covering an area of ​​approximately four hectares (1.6 hectares) and varying in size from three to five feet (1 to 1.6 m)

Experts say that 30 tons of stone was used in the construction of the site - part of which was arranged in a horseshoe shape, similar to the famous Carnac standing stones in northwestern France

Experts say that 30 tons of stone was used in the construction of the site - part of which was arranged in a horseshoe shape, similar to the famous Carnac standing stones in northwestern France

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Experts say that 30 tons of stone was used in the construction of the site – part of which was arranged in a horseshoe shape, similar to the famous Carnac standing stones in northwestern France

The monoliths and cairn, which may have had religious or spiritual significance for their builders, were deliberately brought down - perhaps by a later culture with different beliefs, researchers say

The monoliths and cairn, which may have had religious or spiritual significance for their builders, were deliberately brought down - perhaps by a later culture with different beliefs, researchers say

The monoliths and cairn, which may have had religious or spiritual significance for their builders, were deliberately brought down – perhaps by a later culture with different beliefs, researchers say

Experts suggest that a powerful leader may have ordered the construction of the site, or that different communities have worked together to achieve this ancient technology performance.

The builders may have destroyed the monolithic arrangement itself as part of a ritual or ceremony, or raiders from outside the region may have destroyed it.

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& # 39; This ensemble first evokes the great Armorican megalithic monuments, especially those of Carnac, but it is part of a dense network of megalithic expressions present throughout Western Europe, & # 39; said a spokesperson for Inrap in a written statement.

& # 39; Pushed into large pits, sometimes maimed or covered with earth, monoliths seem to have been deliberately removed from the landscape – perhaps due to a change in community beliefs.

& # 39; Just like the alignment of menhirs, the cairn was deliberately removed from the landscape. The stones that made up the elevation were torn from the monument and thrown into a large pit next to it. & # 39;

The cairn or burial mound is 52 feet (14 m) long and 20 feet (6.5 m) wide and has four sides and is made of clamped stone slabs, possibly from fallen or destroyed menhirs

The cairn or burial mound is 52 feet (14 m) long and 20 feet (6.5 m) wide and has four sides and is made of clamped stone slabs, possibly from fallen or destroyed menhirs

The cairn or burial mound is 52 feet (14 m) long and 20 feet (6.5 m) wide and has four sides and is made of clamped stone slabs, possibly from fallen or destroyed menhirs

The menhirs are arranged in a straight line that stretches over at least 150 feet (150 m) in a north-south direction, experts say, as seen in this site overhead photo
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The menhirs are arranged in a straight line that stretches over at least 150 feet (150 m) in a north-south direction, experts say, as seen in this site overhead photo

The menhirs are arranged in a straight line that stretches over at least 150 feet (150 m) in a north-south direction, experts say, as seen in this site overhead photo

Five large stones in the shape of a horseshoe are placed nearby, alongside six regularly spaced blocks that form a circle with a diameter of 50 feet (15 m)

Five large stones in the shape of a horseshoe are placed nearby, alongside six regularly spaced blocks that form a circle with a diameter of 50 feet (15 m)

Five large stones in the shape of a horseshoe are placed nearby, alongside six regularly spaced blocks that form a circle with a diameter of 50 feet (15 m)

The monoliths are close to what was once an important transport route during the Stone Age, which is now an important road.

One of the monoliths is particularly interesting because it is the only one made from limestone, while the rest is all basalt.

The rock also has a human-like figure carved on it, complete with a rounded head, rough shoulders and two small breasts.

This type of carving is extremely rare and resembles Northern French, Breton and Swiss examples in style, according to the Inrap website.

Employees widening the A75 motorway near Veyre-Monton in central France made the first discovery and hired experts from the National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research (Inrap) to explore the site

Employees widening the A75 motorway near Veyre-Monton in central France made the first discovery and hired experts from the National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research (Inrap) to explore the site

Employees widening the A75 motorway near Veyre-Monton in central France made the first discovery and hired experts from the National Institute of Preventive Archaeological Research (Inrap) to explore the site

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