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More than 20,000 Melburnians promise to stand at their front doors and unleash a collective scream

Frustrated Melburnians have vowed to stand on their front porches and unite in a chorus of collective screams as a bizarre way of dealing with lockdown restrictions.

Residents of the nation’s coronavirus capital pledged to stand together figuratively and unleash a communal scream at 7pm on Friday as a way to vent pent-up anger as the city endures the second week of phase four restrictions.

It is based on the success of last Friday’s event called ‘get up on your porch and scream’, which attracted a 24,000-strong group of Facebook users who marked themselves as ‘present’ on the social media events page.

Organizer Tess Roberts created the movement as a light-hearted way for isolated residents to deal with the horrors of the pandemic.

Last Friday's event called 'get on your porch and scream', which attracted a 24,000 strong group of Facebook users (photo: one of the participants)

Last Friday’s event called ‘get on your porch and scream’, which attracted a 24,000 strong group of Facebook users (photo: one of the participants)

Covid’s s ** t. Everyone is a bit sad. Just stand on your porch and yell until you feel a little better. Let’s all unite in our shared depression, ‘she wrote in the description.

Enthusiastic wails joined hands in a cacophony of high pitched shouts, uploading many videos of their efforts.

A social media user captured chilling images of the night sky, punctuated by the howls of defeated Australians.

“I heard screams for blocks,” he wrote on Twitter.

Participating was also quite cathartic. After a few minutes, but before the sound of raindrops, life returned to an eerie silence. ‘

The movement prompted music legend Jimmy Barnes to release vocal tips for avid screamers.

Enthusiastic wails joined forces in a cacophony of high pitched shouts, with many uploading videos of their efforts (photo)

Enthusiastic wails joined forces in a cacophony of high pitched shouts, with many uploading videos of their efforts (photo)

Enthusiastic wails joined forces in a cacophony of high pitched shouts, with many uploading videos of their efforts (photo)

“I start a little low and then I get higher and higher,” he explained.

“I think a good shout really releases a bit of tension, so it’s a good thing to do.”

Attendees at last week’s event shared their experiences screaming on the air.

“My throat hurts, but my heart is happy,” said one woman.

“I just screamed and heard a few more voices in the distance,” said another.

Not all screechers were from the metropolis of Melbourne, with a woman from Dandenong on the city’s outer borders joining the movement.

‘I did it. I screamed so loud people’s lights started to turn on, I heard doors open, I ran back into my house and just laughed my head off. I felt so good, I felt free, I heard a few other people on the road … I think I scared them. ‘

Attendees at last week's event shared their experiences screaming into the abyss (photo)

Attendees at last week's event shared their experiences screaming into the abyss (photo)

Attendees at last week’s event shared their experiences screaming into the abyss (photo)

Not all screechers were from the metropolis of Melbourne, with a woman from Dandenong on the city's outer borders joining the movement. Pictured: A participant videotaping their scream

Not all screechers were from the metropolis of Melbourne, with a woman from Dandenong on the city's outer borders joining the movement. Pictured: A participant videotaping their scream

Not all screechers were from the metropolis of Melbourne, with a woman from Dandenong on the city’s outer borders joining the movement. Pictured: A participant videotaping their scream

But not everyone was aware of the event and took to social media to ask others.

“Does anyone else hear a ton of screams?” they asked.

“Strange … it’s not in my head either, it’s certainly in Brunswick East.”

The second ‘stand on your front porch and scream’ event will take place simultaneously this Friday and will be hosted by Sean Icon McVeigh.

The 35-year-old hopes to continue the event every week.

Since the last event was a success, I thought, ‘Why not let it go every Friday night at 7pm until the lockdown is over? ‘ he told news.com.au.

Just for fun and to get some of that frustration out of this stupid COVID. It’s simple, all you have to do is go out and scream and let everything out. ‘

Pictured: Very quiet Bourke Street seen on August 11 as Melbourne plows through the second week of Phase Four restrictions

Pictured: Very quiet Bourke Street seen on August 11 as Melbourne plows through the second week of Phase Four restrictions

Pictured: Very quiet Bourke Street seen on August 11 as Melbourne plows through the second week of Phase Four restrictions

Thursday's fatalities bring the state toll to 275 and the national figure to 360. A record 725 new daily infections were recorded on August 5.

Thursday's fatalities bring the state toll to 275 and the national figure to 360. A record 725 new daily infections were recorded on August 5.

Thursday’s fatalities bring the state toll to 275 and the national figure to 360. A record 725 new daily infections were recorded on August 5.

The phase four restrictions were initially in effect for six weeks and are expected to be lifted by mid-September if the day-to-day counts are successfully reduced to double digits.

Virus deaths on Thursday brought the state death toll to 275 and the national figure to 360.

Prime Minister Andrews was convinced that Victoria’s second wave of COVID-19 curve was flattening, but said it depended on “literally hundreds of millions of individual choices and decisions.”

Noting that Victoria’s average was down over seven days, Mr. Andrews acknowledged that the effects of Phase 4 wouldn’t be known until next week.

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