More than 100,000 Americans are hospitalized with COVID-19 for the first time since January

More than 100,000 Americans are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 for the first time in eight months as the fourth wave of the pandemic continues.

According to data from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), 101,050 hospital beds are occupied by people being treated for the virus.

This is a 147 percent increase from the 40,791 patients hospitalized with COVID-19 four weeks ago and the first time this number has reached six figures since the end of January during the deadly winter wave of 2020-21.

In addition, the number of people hospitalized with Covid is more than double the nearly 49,000 hospitalizations recorded on the same day in 2020.

Doctors say they’ve had to reject patients because they don’t have enough beds to treat virus patients as well as those seeking care for unrelated problems.

It comes as the U.S. registered 148,143 cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday with a seven-day moving average of 152,480, which is a 138 percent increase from the average of 63,842 reported four weeks ago, according to figures from the Johns. Hopkins University.

The number of deaths is also increasing with 1,456 recorded fatalities and a seven-day moving average of 1,100 – the fifth day in a row that the average has surpassed four digits.

This is an increase of 291 percent from the average of 281 reported 28 days ago and the highest number since March 20.

More than 100,000 Americans are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 for the first time since January, and 147% more than the 40,791 patients hospitalized four weeks ago

More than 100,000 Americans are currently hospitalized with COVID-19 for the first time since January, and 147% more than the 40,791 patients hospitalized four weeks ago

On Wednesday, the US registered 148,143 cases of COVID-19 with a seven-day moving average of 152,480, which is a 138% increase over the past month

On Wednesday, the US registered 148,143 cases of COVID-19 with a seven-day moving average of 152,480, which is a 138% increase over the past month

On Wednesday, the US registered 148,143 cases of COVID-19 with a seven-day moving average of 152,480, which is a 138% increase over the past month

Deaths also rose with 1,456 fatalities on Wednesday and a seven-day moving average of 1,100, a peak of 391% from the average observed 28 days earlier.

Deaths also rose with 1,456 fatalities on Wednesday and a seven-day moving average of 1,100, a peak of 391% from the average observed 28 days earlier.

Deaths also rose with 1,456 fatalities on Wednesday and a seven-day moving average of 1,100, a peak of 391% from the average observed 28 days earlier.

With about half of the U.S. population still unvaccinated against COVID-19 — according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — hospitals are feeling tense as cases mount and beds fill up.

Florida currently experiences the worst per capita rate in America with 80 hospitalizations per 100,000 people, according to HHS data.

Rounding out the top five are Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi and Georgia, all of which report more than 54 hospitalizations per 100,000.

“I had to turn down a cancer patient who needed emergency treatment simply because my hospital had no beds,” Dr. Nitesh Paryani, an oncologist at St Joseph’s Hospital in Tampa, Florida, Bay News 9.

‘[The Indian ‘Delta’ variant] just hurtles through the hospitals in ways we couldn’t have imagined and the pressure it puts on the healthcare system is unimaginable.”

He said the hospital’s emergency room recently waited 12 hours for people seeking care.

Other hospitals across the country report similar situations.

In New Mexico, 433 people have been hospitalized, a 386 percent increase from the 89 hospitalized a month ago and a figure not seen since early February, state data shows.

At a news conference on Wednesday, Dr. David Scrase, acting secretary of the Department of Health, said New Mexico’s hospital system is days away from achieving “crisis standards of care” status.

“What it means is that one of the normal routine services you’d get for non-life-threatening emergencies may be less available,” he said.

“But what it ultimately means is that we have to choose who gets care and who doesn’t, and we don’t want to get that far.”

The last time the state achieved this status was in December 2020, when the country was well into the third wave of the pandemic.

According to HHS data, 83 percent of New Mexico’s ICU beds are occupied and nearly a third are used to treat COVID-19 patients.

However, according to Scrase, the state has a waiting list of about 50 people waiting for ICU beds, including in Albuquerque, the state’s largest city.

‘It is a completely new phenomenon. You don’t get many people off a waiting list when all your beds are full, and that’s the problem,” he said.

In New Mexico, 433 people have been hospitalized with Covid, a figure not seen since February, and officials say the state is days away from reaching “crisis standards of care,” meaning doctors will have to decide who gets care

In Tennessee, 2,984 patients have been hospitalized with COVID-19, up 319% from 712 a month ago, and hospitals say they have had to divert people to other medical centers

In Tennessee, 2,984 patients have been hospitalized with COVID-19, up 319% from 712 a month ago, and hospitals say they have had to divert people to other medical centers

In Tennessee, 2,984 patients have been hospitalized with COVID-19, up 319% from 712 a month ago, and hospitals say they have had to divert people to other medical centers

Oregon has hospitalized a record 1,080 patients and Gov Kate Brown announced that the state is deploying 'crisis teams' of frontline workers in the worst-hit regions

Oregon has hospitalized a record 1,080 patients and Gov Kate Brown announced that the state is deploying 'crisis teams' of frontline workers in the worst-hit regions

Oregon has hospitalized a record 1,080 patients and Gov Kate Brown announced that the state is deploying ‘crisis teams’ of frontline workers in the worst-hit regions

In Tennessee, 2,984 patients have been hospitalized with COVID-19, up 319 percent from 712 a month ago, and nearly the record 3,230 seen in early January, according to state data.

dr. David Sellers, the chief of staff at Ascension St Thomas Rutherford Hospital in Murfreesboro — 30 miles south of Nashville — said the hospital’s intensive care unit was full for the past week.

About 60 percent of the patients on the ward are infected with COVID-19.

“For the foreseeable future, my focus is on the worst,” he said WKRN.

“I’m getting ready for more numbers to come in, maybe some of my doctors will die with this disease too, because we’re exposed to it all the time. I mean, that’s just a reality that can happen.”

He explained that his hospitals and others had to send patients elsewhere for treatment or, in other cases, reject patients.

“What it does is it makes us have to send patients elsewhere, or worse, patients from other facilities that depend on our hospital because they’re in a small area…they can’t go to our facility.” because we can’t accept them because we’re on a distraction, as we call it when we run out of capacity,” Sellers said.

“Those smaller institutions will eventually have to call around and just try to find an institution that can take care of their patient.”

In Oregon, a record 1,080 patients have been hospitalized, which is a 990 percent increase since July 9, according to state health officials.

There are also fewer than 50 ICU beds available in the state, with some hospitals reporting patients lined up in beds in hallways.

Gov Kate Brown said on Wednesday Oregon is deploying “crisis teams,” including nurses, respiratory therapists and others, to areas hardest hit by the latest wave.

At least 500 frontline workers will be sent to central and southern Oregon, while smaller teams will be sent to other regions.

“The deployment of crisis teams should provide welcome relief to our hospitals,” Brown said at a news conference.

“The hospital crisis we face isn’t just about beds — it’s about having enough trained health professionals to treat patients.”

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