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More drugs, less booze and darts: New data shows that Australians drink or smoke less

More drugs, less booze and darts: New data shows Australians are giving up booze and cigarettes, but other numbers are alarming

  • Illegal drugs such as cannabis, cocaine and psychedelics are on the rise in Australia
  • Cannabis is Australia’s most popular controlled substance
  • Alcohol is still the country’s favorite drug, but more people are giving up
  • The data was compiled from a survey of 22,000 Australians aged 14 years and older

Australians smoke less, take more drugs and drink about the same amount of alcohol as three years ago.

Residents of regional and remote cities smoke and drink more than people in large cities, new health data show.

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare surveyed more than 22,000 Australians ages 14 and older.

Alcohol remains Australia's favorite drug (stock image of women drinking at a bar)

Alcohol remains Australia’s favorite drug (stock image of women drinking at a bar)

The use of cannabis, cocaine, ecstasy, ketamine, hallucinogens and inhalants has increased between 2016 and 2019.

Cannabis remains Australia’s most popular controlled substance, with more than one in three users getting high at least once a week.

Cocaine use is increasingly common, with about one in six users sniffing lines at least once a month, against about one in ten in 2016.

Wealthier Australians used party drugs such as cocaine or ecstasy more often, while poorer Australians used more opioids.

One in six Australians have used drugs in the past 12 months.

The use of methamphetamines, such as ice cream, has remained stable for the past three years.

Cannabis remains Australia's most popular controlled substance, with more than one in three users getting high at least once a week (picture of a girl smoking cannabis)

Cannabis remains Australia's most popular controlled substance, with more than one in three users getting high at least once a week (picture of a girl smoking cannabis)

Cannabis remains Australia’s most popular controlled substance, with more than one in three users getting high at least once a week (picture of a girl smoking cannabis)

Younger Australians avoided more cigarettes, but old habits died hard for people over 40.

Rollies were also more popular than custom cigarettes.

Alcohol remains Australia’s favorite drug and people continue to drink dangerous amounts.

But more Australians gave up grog, with the percentage of dry people rising from 7.6 percent in 2016 to 8.9 percent in 2019.

Younger Australians avoided more cigarettes, but old habits died hard for people over 40 (image of a young woman smoking a cigarette)

Younger Australians avoided more cigarettes, but old habits died hard for people over 40 (image of a young woman smoking a cigarette)

Younger Australians avoided more cigarettes, but old habits died hard for people over 40 (image of a young woman smoking a cigarette)

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