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Montana’s husband, 57, has been charged with animal cruelty after 230 cows were starved, including 65 deaths

Farm owner, 57, is accused of animal cruelty after ‘starving 230 cows’ – 65 of whom died – and agents call $ 100,000 clean up amid coronavirus pandemic ‘worthless timing’

  • George J. Savoy, 57, was detained on Tuesday and charged with aggravated animal cruelty
  • Passers-by saw the black Angus herd spread across the Montana landscape
  • Some were pregnant. Many could not move and were covered with bird droppings
  • County funds spent on animal care are estimated to cost up to $ 100,000
  • “Talk about bad timing for something like that,” said Commissioner Joe Briggs
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

A central Montana man has been charged with aggravated animal cruelty after 230 cows were starved in the middle of the calf season, including 65 found dead.

George J. Savoy, 57, was taken into custody on Tuesday after people driving past his property, about 40 miles southwest of Great Falls, reported seeing the dead cows, the Great Falls Grandstand reported.

The area was said to be filled with a terrible stench, and animals were scattered around the landscape, and many were unable to move and were covered in bird droppings.

The Cascade County Sheriff’s office, public works, and the State Department of Livestock responded on the scene Tuesday to remove carcasses – some from a stream – and feed the surviving animals.

Cascade County Sheriff Jesse Slaughter conducts an interview in an area where a herd of approximately 230 starvated livestock was found on Tuesday

Cascade County Sheriff Jesse Slaughter conducts an interview in an area where a herd of approximately 230 starvated livestock was found on Tuesday

A total of 65 cows were dead, all believed to be starving to death on a farm west of Cascade, Montana

A total of 65 cows were dead, all believed to be starving to death on a farm west of Cascade, Montana

A total of 65 cows were dead, all believed to be starving to death on a farm west of Cascade, Montana

The land is “grazed to the mud,” said Captain Scott Van Dyken, noting that the animals had no food.

A number of animals are pregnant.

“You can walk up on some of these mothers,” said Deputy Prosecutor Jennifer Quick, adding that some of the surviving animals were pregnant. “They couldn’t get up, they were so weak.”

An investigator from the Great Falls district of the Montana Department of Livestock said this was the worst case of animal cruelty to livestock he had seen.

“I’ve never seen anyone like that,” said Paul Johnson from the scene.

Three other Savoy properties were controlled, the authorities said.

“This is a major disaster,” said Cascade County Sheriff Jesse Slaughter of the starving black Angus herd. “I know this community wants to help. And you know what? We need their help. ‘

The dead cow's carcass is in a pasture on Mission Road with bird droppings everywhere

The dead cow's carcass is in a pasture on Mission Road with bird droppings everywhere

The dead cow’s carcass is in a pasture on Mission Road with bird droppings everywhere

An emaciated cow is waiting for food. It can cost $ 27,000 a month to feed them and a total of $ 100,000 to pay someone to move and take care of them

An emaciated cow is waiting for food. It can cost $ 27,000 a month to feed them and a total of $ 100,000 to pay someone to move and take care of them

An emaciated cow is waiting for food. It can cost $ 27,000 a month to feed them and a total of $ 100,000 to pay someone to move and take care of them

It is unclear how the situation came about, but it is in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic that many people may not be able to help due to reduced incomes and social distance measures.

In Montana, there are 217 confirmed COVID-19 cases and 6 deaths in the counties of Toole, Madison and Lincoln.

“Talk about bad timing for something like that,” said Commissioner Joe Briggs.

Cascade County attorney Josh Racki said he planned to file an animal welfare petition to confiscate the herd and potentially receive reimbursement for county fees spent on animal care, estimated to cost up to $ 100,000.

It can cost $ 27,000 a month to feed them and pay someone to move and take care of them, the starting range for the cost is $ 50,000.

You can make donations at the Cascade Solid Waste Site on Simms-Cascade Road.

Financial donations can be made to the Sheriff’s Office at 3800 N. Ulm Frontage Road or through the Sheriff’s Legacy Foundation website.

Call 406-454-6820 for questions to the sheriff.

In this photo from Tuesday, March 31, 2020, Cascade County Sheriff Jesse Slaughter discusses his office seizing several hundred starving cows and calves

In this photo from Tuesday, March 31, 2020, Cascade County Sheriff Jesse Slaughter discusses his office seizing several hundred starving cows and calves

In this photo from Tuesday, March 31, 2020, Cascade County Sheriff Jesse Slaughter discusses his office seizing several hundred starving cows and calves

Financial donations can be made to the Sheriff's Office at 3800 N. Ulm Frontage Road Call 406-454-6820 for questions to the Sheriff

Financial donations can be made to the Sheriff's Office at 3800 N. Ulm Frontage Road Call 406-454-6820 for questions to the Sheriff

Financial donations can be made to the Sheriff’s Office at 3800 N. Ulm Frontage Road Call 406-454-6820 for questions to the Sheriff

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