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Montana woman stumbles as she runs away from an attacking bison and plays dead to survive the attack

Montana woman stumbles as she runs away from an attacking bison and plays dead to survive the attack in Yellowstone National Park

  • The Montana woman’s meeting with the bison in Yellowstone was captured on video
  • You can see her running away from an attacking bison, tripping and falling
  • She immediately stops moving and plays dead while the bison catches up to her
  • Yellowstone’s wild bison are generally allowed to roam freely in the park

A Montana woman played dead to avoid injury when she fell for an attacking bison in Yellowstone National Park.

The woman can be seen in a video shot at Nez Perce Creek in the Wyoming section of the national park.

In the clip, you can hear people shouting off-screen as two people – the woman and what appears to be a man – are run away from two attacking bison.

Montana's wife can be seen running away from the attacking bison

She then trips and falls to the ground where she immediately plays dead

She then trips and falls to the ground where she immediately plays dead

Montana’s wife can be seen running away from the attacking bison (left) before tripping and falling to the ground (right) where she immediately plays dead

As the nearest bison approaches, the woman trips and falls on the grass. She lies completely still while the bison overtakes her position within a fraction of a second.

“Play dead! Play dead! ” people can yell at her as the bison prances around her body and eventually moves away from her.

Cloie Musumecci, who sent the video to MTN, said that the woman chased by the bison is “a resident of Montana, so she knew she had to play dead in that situation.”

The quick-thinking woman, who had not been identified, was then able to ‘escape without a scratch,’ Musumecci said, KBZK.

The woman does not move even when the bison catches up to her and practically stands on her

The woman does not move even when the bison catches up to her and practically stands on her

The woman does not move even when the bison catches up to her and practically stands on her

After a short time, the bison seems to lose interest and begins to turn away from the woman

After a short time, the bison seems to lose interest and begins to turn away from the woman

After a short time, the bison seems to lose interest and begins to turn away from the woman

The incident took place at Nez Perce Creek in the Wyoming section of Yellowstone Park

The incident took place at Nez Perce Creek in the Wyoming section of Yellowstone Park

The incident took place at Nez Perce Creek in the Wyoming section of Yellowstone Park

It is not clear from the video what the bison triggered or how close they were to the two people before the bison started attacking them.

It is also unclear when the incident occurred.

Yellowstone allows its bison to roam the park relatively freely, according to his website. The bison population has not been crossed with cattle like most other bison herds and exhibits wild behavior like their ancestors.

Yellowstone bison have a history of attacking park visitors or their cars, often after getting too close.

In late June, a 72-year-old woman from California was videotaped when she got too close – within three meters – to a wandering bison in the park. The woman was supported by the bison, who also threw her between 10 and 15 feet into the air during the attack, witnesses said WCCO.

“Bisons are wildlife that respond to threats by displaying aggressive behaviors, such as scratching, sniffing, bobbing, roaring, and raising their tails,” said Yellowstone’s senior bison biologist, Chrisstone. Time after the woman’s attack.

If that doesn’t remove the threat (in this case, a person), an endangered bison can file charges. To be around bison safely, stay at least 25 meters away, leave as they approach and run or take cover if they attack. ‘

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