Mo’Nque is ‘unabashed’ for telling black women not to wear hats in public

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Oscar-winning actress Mo’Nique has defiantly doubled down on her controversial comments about black women wearing caps and headscarves in public, insisting she comes from a “place of love” and warning that she will not be ‘cancelled’ by online critics.

The 53-year-old took to Instagram to defend herself against a bitter backlash sparked when she lashed out at the “young sisters” she saw on a recent trip to the airport in Atlanta wearing headgear, pyjamas, slippers and blankets.

“As we started walking through the airport, I saw so many, too many to count…but I saw so many of our young sisters wearing headwear, scarves, slippers, pyjamas, blankets around them – and this is how show up at the airport,” she said in her original video.

Mo’Nique, who won the 2009 Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her performance in Precious, accused the women she’d seen of not being “proud” of themselves, asking, “When did we move away from, “Let’s we I make sure I’m presentable when I leave my house. Let me make sure I represent the family I’ve created. So that when I’m on the street I look like I’m proud of myself”?

Doubling: Oscar-winning actress Mo'Nique has defended herself after receiving bitter reactions for telling black women not to wear hats and headscarves in public

Doubling: Oscar-winning actress Mo’Nique has defended herself after receiving bitter reactions for telling black women not to wear hats and headscarves in public

Hit Back: The 53-year-old comedian hit back at critics in a recent Instagram video, insisting she won't be 'cancelled' and making her comments 'from a place of love'

Hit Back: The 53-year-old comedian hit back at critics in a recent Instagram video, insisting she won’t be ‘cancelled’ and making her comments ‘from a place of love’

Controversy: Mo'Nique recently took to Instagram to publicly laugh at

Controversy: Mo'Nique recently took to Instagram to publicly laugh at

Controversy: Mo’Nique recently took to Instagram to publicly laugh at “young sisters” she saw at the Atlanta airport wearing hats, headscarves, pyjamas and slippers

Warning: She suggested that women who wear hats and these kinds of outfits show others that they are not proud of themselves

Warning: She suggested that women who wear hats and these kinds of outfits show others that they are not proud of themselves

While the comedian insisted her comments weren’t made “from a place of judgment,” her video sparked outrage online, with many criticizing her for lecturing other black women about what they could and couldn’t wear in public — while also pointed out that a person’s appearance does not reflect the pride he feels in himself.

Others accused her of trying to “control black women,” with one commentator criticizing Mo’Nique for criticizing anyone who “goes the extra mile to keep taking care of their hair by wearing a beanie.”

Some also pointed to the irony of Mo’Nique making comments about the appearance of other black women, while she herself was dressed in a very casual robe.

“Like this satire?” a person interrogated. ‘You’re literally in bathrobe, no bra, hair not yet done talking to the PUBLIC about presentation? Please tell me this is a joke and you’re trying to prove a point.’

Mo’Nique was also criticized for trying to encourage black women to “conform to white culture and society” by restricting what they could wear in public.

Hats and headscarves are traditionally worn by black women to protect their natural hair, especially at night, and they have a rich history and significance within black culture.

But despite the outraged response to her video, the actress defiantly stayed behind her controversial comments and posted a second clip in which she not only defended herself but insisted that no criticism would stop her from speaking out. .

Cultural significance: Hats and headscarves are traditionally used to protect natural hair, especially at night, and they have a rich history within black culture

Cultural significance: Hats and headscarves are traditionally used to protect natural hair, especially at night, and they have a rich history within black culture

Cultural significance: Hats and headscarves are traditionally used to protect natural hair, especially at night, and have a rich history within black culture (stock images)

Examples: She specifically referred to women she'd seen wearing headgear at the airport (stock image), but noted that she'd seen the trend at the mall as well

Examples: She specifically referred to women she’d seen wearing headgear at the airport (stock image), but noted that she’d seen the trend at the mall as well

At odds: Some commentators suggested it was ironic that Mo'Nique was trying to

At odds: Some commentators suggested it was ironic that Mo’Nique was trying to “control” the appearance of other black women while wearing a bathrobe herself

“For you babies who took offense at what I said, I’m fine with that,” she said.

“I think it’s okay that you all feel that way. I’m okay with that because if you really love someone, I know you’ll all get over it.

“And if you all say, ‘We’ll cancel your appointment,’ then they tried, and I’m still here to let you all know that I love you and there’s nothing you can do about it. ‘

Defiant: The actress, who won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress in 2009 for her role in Precious, warned that others have tried to

Defiant: The actress, who won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress in 2009 for her role in Precious, warned that others have tried to “cancel” her in the past but have always failed

The on-screen star, who again sued Netflix for discrimination in 2019, explained that she was simply trying to share advice with other women by “tapping” them, something she’s grateful to have experienced from two people in her life. in the past: Patti LaBelle and Margaret Avery.

Neither women, she noted, tried to reconcile their words, claiming she appreciated their bluntness because it helped them make the desired impact on her life.

“Patti LaBelle had to tap me one night when we were getting ready to do a show and I was in my feelings about some shit and that woman had to come tap me and tell me to pull myself together,” she explained. .

And she didn’t tell me with lollipops and pancakes with syrup everywhere, she told me what I really needed to hear. And I was grateful for that that night because it affected my life.’

Mo’Nique continued: “Miss Margaret Avery, I was thankful the night she called my dressing room and she said to me, ‘Honey, focus on taking some more of that weight off you because I see what you is doing.”

“And I’m glad those two women loved me enough that they went out of their way to talk to me the way aunts, mothers, big sisters, their little sisters, nieces, granddaughters, daughters talk. I was grateful for that, because it allowed me to think about things differently.’

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