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The outspoken Egyptian-American writer Mona Eltahawy (photo) led to controversy when she suggested that the Q&A panel of rapists be killed

A panel member who caused indignation in the midst of claims that she promoted violence during ABC's Q&A program has doubled her controversial comments.

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During an explosive all-female panel on the program last week, Egyptian-American writer Mona Eltahawy suggested that rapists be killed.

& # 39; I want Patriarchate to fear feminism … how long do we have to wait for men and boys to stop killing us, stop hitting us and stop rape? How many rapists should we kill until men stop raping? & # 39; she said during the panel.

The episode became a subject of heated debate throughout Australia, with the program receiving dozens of complaints and the national broadcaster then investigating itself.

But days later, Mrs. Eltahawy doubled her position and said she was trying to wake people up to the reality of violence against women.

& # 39; I'm clearly not saying that women go out on the street to kill people, & # 39; she said The ageand noted that she was planning & # 39; unsavory & # 39; and & # 39; barbaric & # 39; to sound.

& # 39; Why are these white, male, right-wing commentators so obsessed with someone trying to shake people up that they notice how horrible these statistics are when it comes to sexual violence and murder? Last year (in Melbourne) a young woman was raped and killed in a park while walking home. How does this happen today? & # 39;

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She continued to say that the outrage she received should be focused on the issue of violence experienced by girls and women.

& # 39; If I ask: & # 39; How many rapists do we have to kill before men stop raping us? & # 39; scares men, then let them be scared. Too many women and girls live every day in fear of actual male violence. When will so much indignation be directed at violence against women? & # 39;

Mrs. Eltahawy's controversial statements came in response to a member of the public who asked whether violence was the best way for feminists to achieve equality.

When questioned by the host of the program, Fran Kelly, whether she was promoting violence, Mrs. Eltahawy replied: “What I do is say that that violence is state property … exactly how long do I have to wait to be safe? to be? & # 39;

The outspoken Egyptian-American writer Mona Eltahawy (photo) led to controversy when she suggested that the Q&A panel of rapists be killed

The outspoken Egyptian-American writer Mona Eltahawy (photo) led to controversy when she suggested that the Q&A panel of rapists be killed

Mrs. Eltahawy speculated that the play she received was mainly from white men.

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& # 39; If I ask & # 39; how many rapists do we have to kill before men stop raping women? & # 39 ;, white men usually focus on the first part of the sentence, which is a theoretical question, because I am not going to kill anyone there and they totally ignore the second part of my sentence, & she said BuzzFeed News.

& # 39; (The panel) consisted of five women and one non-binary person and not a single white man, so I think that played a huge role in the complete slack.

& # 39; You have women and non-binary people who tell you about injustice and all white men say you upset the boys here. & # 39;

The explosive comments came after a member of the public wondered whether violence would contribute to achieving equality (photo: from left to right: American anti-aging campaigner Ashton Applewhite, Egyptian-American writer Mona Eltahawy, businesswoman Hana Assafiri, host Fran Kelly, native writer and activist Nayuka Gorrie, journalist and author Jess Hill)

The explosive comments came after a member of the public wondered whether violence would contribute to achieving equality (photo: from left to right: American anti-aging campaigner Ashton Applewhite, Egyptian-American writer Mona Eltahawy, businesswoman Hana Assafiri, host Fran Kelly, native writer and activist Nayuka Gorrie, journalist and author Jess Hill)

The explosive comments came after a member of the public wondered whether violence would contribute to achieving equality (photo: from left to right: American anti-aging campaigner Ashton Applewhite, Egyptian-American writer Mona Eltahawy, businesswoman Hana Assafiri, host Fran Kelly, native writer and activist Nayuka Gorrie, journalist and author Jess Hill)

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The native writer and activist Nayuka Gorrie supported her comments and said that violence & # 39; OK & # 39; used to be.

& # 39; For more than 230 years we have tried to appeal to the morality of the settlers, which just doesn't seem to exist, & # 39; she said on the panel.

& # 39; I think violence is okay, because if someone tries to kill you, there is no question of: & # 39; But I'm really smart. I am really articulated & # 39 ;. No amount of them will save you. Let's burn things. & # 39;

Following Mrs. Eltahawy's comments, the program was flooded with dozens of complaints, with the ABC announcing that the episode would be completely removed from all platforms.

& # 39; We cannot do much more than make the statement we have and we will not repeat the program. The plan is to take it off, & # 39; ABC Chairman Ita Buttrose told The Australian.

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Media analyst Julian Evans has complained about the show at the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA).

Mrs. Eltahawy (photo) speculated that the large number of complaints came from white men who & # 39; scared & # 39; were left by her comments

Mrs. Eltahawy (photo) speculated that the large number of complaints came from white men who & # 39; scared & # 39; were left by her comments

Mrs. Eltahawy (photo) speculated that the large number of complaints came from white men who & # 39; scared & # 39; were left by her comments

He told Daily Mail Australia: & # 39; Violence against women, children, and men is repugnant and should be condemned on any occasion, not encouraged, discussed with joy, or presented in a way that approves and encourages the community. & # 39 ;

The episode came under fire on social media and some called on the government to get funding from the ABC.

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A viewer wrote: & # 39; Violence is never an option and if the ABC insists on the use of violent rhetoric, I must insist that Scott Morrison obtain funding from the ABC and withdraw his broadcasting license. & # 39;

The episode came under fire on social media and some called on the government to raise funding from the ABC (photo)

The episode came under fire on social media and some called on the government to raise funding from the ABC (photo)

The episode came under fire on social media and some called on the government to raise funding from the ABC (photo)

Another called on Kelly to resign and said she was perfectly at ease with violence & # 39; during the heated panel

Another called on Kelly to resign and said she was perfectly at ease with violence & # 39; during the heated panel

Another called on Kelly to resign and said she was perfectly at ease with violence & # 39; during the heated panel

Another added: & # 39; The ABC promotes violence? It would not be the first time. & # 39;

The broadcaster acknowledged that the program was & # 39; provocative with regard to the language used and some of the views that were presented & # 39; in a statement released Thursday afternoon.

& # 39; Q&A has always tried to tackle difficult problems and present challenging and thought-provoking content. However, I do understand why some viewers found elements of this episode confrontational or offensive.

& # 39; We have received complaints from the public about the program, review the concerns raised and will investigate whether the program meets the editorial standards of ABC. & # 39;

Paul Fletcher, Secretary of Communications, said the episode & # 39; major social concern & # 39; delivered and declared determined to & # 39; fit & # 39; to investigate.

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Dozens of viewers even called on Kelly to resign and said she was at ease with violence & # 39; during the heated panel.

& # 39; Fran Kelly should be relieved of future duties because he made that filthy, uncomfortable Mona Eltahawy speak like this, & # 39; someone wrote.

Dozens of viewers even called on Kelly to resign after the panelists caused controversy (photo)

Dozens of viewers even called on Kelly to resign after the panelists caused controversy (photo)

Dozens of viewers even called on Kelly to resign after the panelists caused controversy (photo)

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