Mom slams ‘unprofessional’ and ‘rude’ teacher for criticizing son’s lunchbox

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An Australian mother has tricked a ‘heartless’ teacher who criticized the way she wrapped her son’s lunchbox in a ‘rude’ note at home on Monday.

The mother explained that her six-year-old son has sensory problems and is on the autistic spectrum, as are many other children with similar conditions.

“Today his teacher told him to eat more fruits and vegetables and his lunches include too many dry cookie options,” the mother said as he posted a rant on Facebook alongside photos of his lunch box.

An Australian mother slapped a ‘heartless’ teacher on Monday who criticized the way she wrapped her son’s lunchbox in a ‘rude’ note at home

“She’s aware that he has autism and SPD, but still has the guts to tell me his lunch isn’t healthy enough,” the mother said angrily.

“I am absolutely furious with her unprofessional behavior and lack of compassion and understanding for my son’s disability.”

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Who is wrong?

  • The mother 0 votes
  • The teacher 2 votes

The mother picks up a banana or apple, V8 fruit juice, yogurt, ham and a selection of dry biscuits, pretzles, marshmallows and pita for her son every day.

But he says he rarely touches the fruit because he doesn’t like foods with too much moisture.

He is extremely picky about what he eats and has only a very small group of foods he will eat. These usually include dry biscuits, ham, plain bread, plain pita, no sauces, no dips, no vegetables, no spreads on bread, ” she said lightly.

This makes providing less dry food and more fruits and vegetables an almost impossible task.

So she took the opportunity to ask mothers for help – after slamming the teacher.

A mother who also has a son with ASD and autism said that when she tried to follow the teachers’ instructions, her son ‘stopped eating at school altogether.’

The mother explained that her six-year-old son has sensory problems and is on the autistic spectrum, like many other children with similar conditions, is a 'picky eater'.

The mother explained that her six-year-old son has sensory problems and is on the autistic spectrum, like many other children with similar conditions, is a ‘picky eater’.

“Today his teacher told him to eat more fruits and vegetables and his lunches include too many dry cookie options,” the mother said as he posted a rant on Facebook alongside photos of his lunch box.

“Now they understand that eating is better than not eating,” she said.

But added that he enjoyed the sachets of fruit puree.

Another mom said the lunches look great and can even be cut to just meat, yogurt, bread, and crackers.

‘Get the fruit out all the way if you want, it’s a common misconception that it’s a necessity, we have two kids who can’t tolerate salicylates and one of them has NO fruit. Those lunches look great in my opinion, just give him what he’s going to eat, ‘she said.

Even teachers were shocked.

What’s in the ideal school lunch box?

Experts have weighed in on what constitutes a healthy lunch pack for school kids – and foods rich in protein and carbohydrates are essential.

According to the experts, your kids should have a carbohydrate-based food in their lunch box every day.

* WHOLE WHOLE OR SOURDOUGH BREAD: Slow-release carbohydrates help stabilize blood sugar.

* PROTEIN: Lean meats, salmon, tuna, egg, or tofu help with alertness and stamina.

* HEALTHY FATS: Things like sunflower seeds, avocado and pumpkin seeds increase satiety, help stabilize kids’ moods and boost their concentration.

* VEGETABLES X 2-3: Foods such as bell pepper, carrot, mashed potatoes and cucumber contain fiber, vitamins and minerals that children need to keep their immune systems healthy.

“The teacher should not tell a child with sensory difficulties what they can and cannot eat,” said one woman, who identified herself as a teacher.

‘I am a teacher and my son is a fussy eater. I’m so sorry your son’s teacher behaved like that. If she is aware of your son’s needs, she has behaved extremely unprofessional. It’s wrong to make such a comment to a student, ”said another.

While some were confused as to why the teacher thought the lunch box was unhealthy.

What does she really mean that it’s not healthy enough? There is fruit, yogurt, various meat components, bread and wraps. I don’t understand, ”said a mother.

But others agreed with the teacher that there were seven or eight “sometimes” foods in each lunch box.

‘Deli meats are high in salt, fruit juice is high in sugar, fruit cups have added fruit juice and sugars, crackers and chips and all those dry cookies are still snacks, lollipops are lollipops, be it fat-free marshmallows or fruit juice strings,’ a mother objected.

A mother who also has a son with ASD and autism and said that when she tried to follow the teacher's instructions, her son 'stopped eating at school altogether'

A mother who also has a son with ASD and autism and said that when she tried to follow the teacher’s instructions, her son ‘stopped eating at school altogether’

“These lunchboxes are testament to the fact that the average parent today has no idea what the word healthy means and it is vital for teachers to improve our nutrition education,” she continued.

Could you tell me where the ‘health food triangle for autistic people’ is? Is there none? Oh that’s because what’s healthy for one child is the same as what’s healthy for another, the only exception being age, gender and allergies, ‘said another.

“The fact that it may be difficult for you as a parent and that it requires WORK doesn’t make it any less.”

Another woman suggested the nori seaweed wraps as a dry alternative to crackers.

A mother said her child liked the vegetable chips and suggested swapping lollipops for fruit chews.

Have you tried dehydrated foods? Could it be a way to get more options in him? a mother suggested.

Another mother with a six-year-old ‘with the same diagnosis’ shared her tips.

‘I make slices and cakes with vegetables in them. He has no idea. His favorite is ginger cake, which is about 80% white sweet potato.

‘I also make a chocolate cake that he likes, with carrots, beetroot and zucchini, again I don’t know. I pulse it in the food processor so it’s absolutely smooth, ‘she said.

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