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Mom is sobbing because she can’t afford her son’s $ 1,000 insulin prescription, despite working full-time

A mother’s tearful admission that despite working full-time she cannot afford her son’s insulin has led commentators to deride the U.S. health care system.

Katie Schieffer’s 10-year-old son was recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and needs insulin every two hours – but the North Carolina mom was left in tears when she couldn’t afford his $ 1,000 prescription.

‘Gutted’ and ‘fighting mad’ about the video, commentators on social media complain that this should not be the reality for any parent – and there isn’t in most developed countries.

Tragic: Mother's tearful admission that she can't afford her son's insulin despite working full-time has led commentators to mock the U.S. health care system

Tragic: Mother’s tearful admission that she can’t afford her son’s insulin despite working full-time has led commentators to mock the U.S. health care system

Katie Schieffer's 10-year-old son has recently been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and needs insulin every two hours

Katie Schieffer's 10-year-old son has recently been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and needs insulin every two hours

Katie couldn't afford his $ 1,000 prescription

Katie couldn't afford his $ 1,000 prescription

Pricey: Katie Schieffer’s 10-year-old son was recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and needs insulin every two hours – but Katie couldn’t afford his $ 1,000 prescription

She said: 'I work a full time job. My husband works full time. I work in the third shift. I go to school during the day. How are you doing? '

She said: 'I work a full time job. My husband works full time. I work in the third shift. I go to school during the day. How are you doing? '

She said: ‘I work a full time job. My husband works full time. I work in the third shift. I go to school during the day. How are you doing? Am I the only one struggling? ‘

Schieffer filmed herself after leaving a pharmacy empty-handed a few days before Christmas.

‘I worked for about 17 years. I work all the time. I’ve been paying medical bills for my son for nine years since he was born, ”she said, crying, her face flushed and her eyes wet with tears.

And he’s just been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and needs to get insulin every two hours.

‘I just got his prescription. It was $ 1,000. I couldn’t pay for it. I couldn’t pay for it. I have to go in now and tell my nine-year-old son I couldn’t afford it, ”she continued.

‘I work a full-time job. My husband works full time. I work in the third shift. I go to school during the day. How are you doing? Am I the only one struggling? ‘

Viral: Her video has been viewed more than half a million times on TikTok, 1.6 million on Twitter and tens of thousands more on Reddit

Viral: Her video has been viewed more than half a million times on TikTok, 1.6 million on Twitter and tens of thousands more on Reddit

Viral: Her video has been viewed more than half a million times on TikTok, 1.6 million on Twitter and tens of thousands more on Reddit

Numerous people have offered Schieffer help by donating to her Venmo and Paypal to buy insulin for her son

Numerous people have offered Schieffer help by donating to her Venmo and Paypal to buy insulin for her son

Numerous people have offered Schieffer help by donating to her Venmo and Paypal to buy insulin for her son

Her video has been viewed more than half a million times on TikTok, 1.6 million on Twitter, and tens of thousands more on Reddit.

Many people have shared their heartbreak for Schieffer, but most are outraged that the U.S. healthcare system is leaving so many people in this position.

“The state of health care in the US is just plain sad. Pharmaceutical companies are constantly adapting their insulin formulas so that it remains patented without actually adding any benefit to it, ” wrote a Redditor.

It’s sad that people in the so-called richest country in the world are still struggling to get insulin. It’s free in Brazil. IN BRAZIL, ”said another.

‘Insulin is so cheap to make; this is absolutely disgusting, ‘wrote another.

On Twitter, commentators from around the world dismissed the US for treating citizens inhumanely by not seeing healthcare as a right.

Speaking of which, many people have shared their heartbreak for Schieffer, but most are outraged that the U.S. healthcare system is leaving so many people in this position

Speaking of which, many people have shared their heartbreak for Schieffer, but most are outraged that the U.S. healthcare system is leaving so many people in this position

Speaking of which, many people have shared their heartbreak for Schieffer, but most are outraged that the U.S. healthcare system is leaving so many people in this position

‘Um, that hurts me. I remember that first pharmacy withdrawal. First time I cried too, and I * could * buy it, although I wondered how we would last. I hope she got some good suggestions and help, ”one wrote.

“Health care in America is so f ** ed,” wrote another. “Yes, the quality might be there, but what’s the point if you can’t afford it and still die?”

“As a German, this just looks like a Third World country, if I didn’t know better … absolutely sad and almost terrifying,” wrote another.

And another: ‘Here in NZ, I pay $ 5 per script item. With a low income. I can see a psychiatrist for free. I don’t know how people survive in the US. ‘

“This is a problem that only exists in America, we can afford to fix this problem, but we choose not to,” wrote another.

'This is a problem that only exists in America, we can afford to fix this problem, but we choose not to do it,' wrote one

'This is a problem that only exists in America, we can afford to fix this problem, but we choose not to do it,' wrote one

‘This is a problem that only exists in America, we can afford to fix this problem, but we choose not to do it,’ wrote one

“I’m not even American, and the absolute INSANITY that is the medical industry in the US makes my blood boil …” said another.

Since the video went viral, countless people have offered Schieffer help, and they shared its Venmo and Paypal usernames for those who want to send financial aid.

Donations seem to have poured in as she’s posted follow-up videos thanking people for their support.

She also shared an update on her smiling son, whose birthday was December 27, as he proudly shared how well he was doing with the treatment.

Josh Wilkerson (right) died after trying to take a cheaper, slower-acting insulin that he rationed to save money on his diabetes medications, leaving behind his fiancé, Rose Walters (left), who also has type 1 diabetes

Josh Wilkerson (right) died after trying to take a cheaper, slower-acting insulin that he rationed to save money on his diabetes medications, leaving behind his fiancé, Rose Walters (left), who also has type 1 diabetes

Josh Wilkerson (right) died after trying to take a cheaper, slower-acting insulin that he rationed to save money on his diabetes medications, leaving behind his fiancé, Rose Walters (left), who also has type 1 diabetes

Josh was in a diabetic coma in the hospital near his home in Leesburg, Virginia for five days in June, before his family took him off his livelihood. He was only 27

Josh was in a diabetic coma in the hospital near his home in Leesburg, Virginia for five days in June, before his family took him off his livelihood. He was only 27

Josh was in a diabetic coma in the hospital near his home in Leesburg, Virginia for five days in June, before his family took him off his livelihood. He was only 27

In June 2019, Josh Wilkerson died in the middle of a diabetic coma at the age of 27 after the cheaper insulin he switched to months earlier let him down.

Wilkerson had insured enough to get high-quality insulin until his 26th birthday, when he was kicked off his stepfather’s plan due to his age.

Like many Americans, Wilkerson simply couldn’t afford to pay between $ 140 and $ 1,000 for insulin, the price of which has tripled since 2001.

He was recently engaged to Rose Walters – who also has type 1 diabetes – and the two started taking $ 25 over-the-counter insulin to save money.

But the older form of insulin didn’t control Josh’s blood sugar. It peaked deadly, and he never woke up from the diabetic coma and multiple strokes.

Jesse James Lutgen, 32, (left) from East Dubuque, Illinois, passed away in 2018

Jesse James Lutgen, 32, (left) from East Dubuque, Illinois, passed away in 2018

His mother, Janelle Lutgen, learned after her son skipped his necessary treatments for type 1 diabetes

His mother, Janelle Lutgen, learned after her son skipped his necessary treatments for type 1 diabetes

Jesse James Lutgen, 32, (left) of East Dubuque, Illinois, died in 2018. His mother, Janelle Lutgen, heard after her son skipped his necessary treatments for type 1 diabetes

In February 2018, Jesse James Lutgen, 32, of East Dubuque, Illinois, died of type 1 diabetes complications for skipping his necessary treatments.

His mother, Janelle Lutgen, said she learned from another person close to Jesse that he had lost his job and insurance and that he was unable to afford the supplies he needed as a result.

“I was told he couldn’t afford his supplies because he lost his job and didn’t have insurance,” the mother said. KWWL.

She was shocked when she visited Jesse’s home earlier this year and found no Humalog or test strips in sight.

“I went to his house, and I didn’t find any Humalog or test strips … that’s what he should take with his meals every time.”

WHY INJECT DIABETICS INSULIN?

Insulin is a hormone made in the pancreas, an organ in your body that aids in digestion.

Insulin helps your body use glucose – which comes from sugar in the food and drink you consume – for muscle strength.

Glucose is initially absorbed from food through the intestines and released into the bloodstream, where the body decides what to do with it.

Insulin makes this decision by controlling how much sugar from the blood goes to the blood cells, muscle, or fat cells, where it can be used up or stored.

But diabetes can mean that the pancreas doesn’t make insulin, doesn’t make enough, or that the insulin it does make isn’t working properly.

This can cause blood sugar levels to become dangerously high or low – which can lead to fatigue, hunger or thirst or in extreme cases, life-threatening coma.

To prevent this and keep blood sugar from getting too high, diabetics can inject insulin into their body as a medicine to lower their blood sugar.

Source: Diabetes mellitus.org

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