Mom, 39, is diagnosed with Alzheimer's just one year after her sister died of the same disease

Kelly Sibbick (center right) was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease one year after losing her sister in the same condition. She is photographed with her husband Robert (left), her daughter Jamie-Lee (second on the left), her sister Jodie Wilkins (right) and Lola, her dog

A family has spoken of their heart pain after a beloved mother of three children aged 39 years was diagnosed with Alzheimer's.

Kelly Sibbick, of Cleethorpes, was diagnosed with the early onset of Alzheimer's disease a year after her sister Mandy Wilkins died of the same condition at age 43.

The family has already lost four family members before age 45 due to Alzheimer's disease; Kelly's mother, her aunt, her cousin and sister Mandy.

Kelly's daughter, Jamie-Lee Sibbick, said the news affected the family a lot, but she also helped unite them to give Kelly as much support as possible.

Kelly Sibbick (center right) was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease one year after losing her sister in the same condition. She is photographed with her husband Robert (left), her daughter Jamie-Lee (second on the left), her sister Jodie Wilkins (right) and Lola, her dog

Kelly Sibbick (center right) was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease one year after losing her sister in the same condition. She is photographed with her husband Robert (left), her daughter Jamie-Lee (second on the left), her sister Jodie Wilkins (right) and Lola, her dog

Jamie-Lee said: "When we discovered that Mom had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease it was very hard for all of us, but something that we expected, since we had been picking up different things in the previous weeks, like her being more forgetful

"We know how the disease can affect him, having gone through all this with many of our family members, including our mother's sister, Mandy, who passed away last year.

"Our plan is to meet with her as much as we can, to support her and keep life as normal as possible.

"With my aunt Mandy, it deteriorated at a very fast pace, but we hope that now that mom has the medication she needs, things are not so bad and we can have her at home as long as possible."

Mandy (pictured) was diagnosed at the age of 37, and despite clinical trials in an attempt to fight the disease, died in September.

Mandy (pictured) was diagnosed at the age of 37, and despite clinical trials in an attempt to fight the disease, died in September.

Mandy (pictured) was diagnosed at the age of 37, and despite clinical trials in an attempt to fight the disease, died in September.

Mandy was diagnosed with the disease at the age of 37, and despite clinical trials in an attempt to fight the disease, died in September last year with his family at his side.

Kelly has a five-year-old daughter, Evie, who finds it very difficult to understand what has happened to her mother.

His family says they hope that eventually he will reach an agreement with his mother's condition.

Jamie-Lee continued: "It's almost impossible to explain to my little sister what is happening with Mom."

"I mean, how do you tell a five-year-old boy that his mother has dementia?

"As he does not understand, he keeps saying things to Mom, like" you, so forgetful ", and he asks himself while he forgets to do things,

"But somehow I think that helps, because mom wants to be treated the same as always and that's what Evie will do."

Her sister Jodie Wilkins, who works as a caregiver and has a lot of experience dealing with people with Alzheimer's disease, says she fears the worst, but with the experience of her family, she feels they can make things as easy as possible for her.

She said: The best thing we can do is keep Kelly's mind focused and continue with life as we normally would.

What is Alzheimer's disease?

Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia.

During the course of the disease, proteins accumulate in the brain to form structures called plaques. and & # 39; tangles & # 39;

Alzheimer's is a progressive disease. This means that more parts of the brain are damaged over time.

When this happens, more symptoms develop. They also become more severe with the first symptom that tends to be lapses in memory.

People can develop problems with other aspects of thinking, reasoning, perception or communication.

As Alzheimer's disease progresses, the problems of memory loss, communication, reasoning and orientation become more serious

Some people may have hallucinations in the later stages of Alzheimer's disease and develop behaviors that seem unusual or out of character.

This could include agitation, restlessness or rhythm, repeat the same question or react aggressively.

"At the moment that she is still with us mentally and can do everything she can normally, she knows when to make dinner, clean and go out and buy, the only problem is that sometimes it is a A little forgetful and it can be repeated a little .

"We can notice that she feels frustrated from time to time, and we let her know that we love her and spit on her a bit so we do not get so happy.

"I discovered that calling her by the nicknames she used when we were kids is a great way to help her, because that also worked for Mandy.

"When we talk about life when we were younger, she does not lose the rhythm.

"Even when we go to stores and meet old friends, she can almost tell you the story of her whole life."

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