Molly-Mae Hague reveals she had surgery to remove lumps in her breast and finger

Molly-Mae Hague has revealed she has undergone surgery to remove a ‘benign’ lump in her breast and a loose mass in her finger.

The former Love Island contestant, 22, shared photos from her hospital bed on Saturday as he revealed she had undergone the procedure.

Molly-Mae had previously talked about discovering a benign lump in her breast and was referred for a biopsy.

Hospital: Molly-Mae Hague has revealed she has had surgery to remove a 'good' lump in her breast and a loose mass in her hand

Hospital: Molly-Mae Hague has revealed she has had surgery to remove a ‘good’ lump in her breast and a loose mass in her hand

Molly-Mae posed for a photo with her beloved cuddly toy Elly Belly and smiled as she revealed she had successfully removed the lump.

She wrote next to the photo: ‘I was talking about a lump I found in my breast in a recent vlog, and I had it removed today. Check your bodies people!!’

To further update her fans, Molly-Mae said, “There was also a lump removed from my finger that I’ve also talked about a few times.”

“Also, having a cannula in my hand has always been without a doubt my BIGGEST fear…so that in itself is a HUGE achievement for me today.”

Molly-Mae previously shared on YouTube that she was referred for a biopsy after discovering a benign lump had grown in her breast, but assured her followers it was “not serious.”

Further updates from her fans, Molly-Mae said: 'A lump was also removed from my finger which I've also talked about a few times'

Further updates from her fans, Molly-Mae said: 'A lump was also removed from my finger which I've also talked about a few times'

Further updates from her fans, Molly-Mae said: ‘A lump was also removed from my finger which I’ve also talked about a few times’

Molly-Mae showed a somber expression as she donned the stylish blazer dress with a brown check print, which she finished with knee-high boots.

The reality TV star carried her essentials in a classic white handbag with her blonde locks in a sleek high bun.

Molly-Mae’s outing comes as she prepares to officially launch her latest range with PrettyLittleThing, which will feature a brand new range of stylish looks.

On Wednesday, Molly-Mae uploaded her latest video to her YouTube channel, where she revealed that her doctors referred her for a biopsy after discovering that a benign lump had grown in her breast.

The star explained that she had previously had the lump checked by doctors, who assured her it was benign and not harmful.

She told her fans, “I actually noticed a small lump in my breast, went to get it checked and it was totally fine, totally benign.

“It’s a little thing called a fibroadenoma and it’s normal to get at this age. Little lumps can occur all the time, but that doesn’t mean they’re sinister.”

Struggle: On Wednesday, Molly-Mae told fans doctors referred her for a biopsy after discovering a benign lump had grown in her breast

Struggle: On Wednesday, Molly-Mae told fans doctors referred her for a biopsy after discovering a benign lump had grown in her breast

Struggle: On Wednesday, Molly-Mae told fans doctors referred her for a biopsy after discovering a benign lump had grown in her breast

Molly-Mae then told fans that she started noticing the bump growing the more noticeable on her clothes.

She continued: ‘I went back today to have it checked and it had grown back a bit, it doesn’t mean it’s sinister, it doesn’t mean it’s dramatic, so the doctor advised us to do a biopsy.

“It wasn’t really that much fun, as I’m scared of needles, but I didn’t really think there was a way around this.

“I promise it’s nothing serious, I don’t want it to be anything big. I think it’s important that I share this with you.

“It’s an important topic and we should all look at our breasts and look at lumps so we can do things like this.”

Molly-Mae told her fans that she would give them an update as soon as she had the results.

Last November, Molly-Mae was devastatingly diagnosed that a mole on her leg was malignant melanoma — a form of skin cancer.

The influencer filmed how she got the diagnosis for her YouTube channel.

In the video, she shared what she went through after her ‘shock’ diagnosis, telling her fans, “I walked around with skin cancer on my leg.”

Disturbing: Molly-Mae then told fans she's started noticing the bump growing the more noticeable on her clothes, and is waiting for the results of further tests

Disturbing: Molly-Mae then told fans she's started noticing the bump growing the more noticeable on her clothes, and is waiting for the results of further tests

Disturbing: Molly-Mae then told fans she’s started noticing the bump growing the more noticeable on her clothes, and is waiting for the results of further tests

Molly-Mae revealed she discovered her birthmark was a malignant melanoma during a work trip to Italy, when a doctor called her to diagnose her after a recent biopsy.

The social media star initially had the mole on her leg checked by two dermatologists, but was told nothing was wrong.

Molly-Mae ended up seeking a third professional opinion during a routine checkup because she “felt something wasn’t right.”

In her YouTube video, after her doctor’s call ended, she told fans, “I got the call today and he told me it’s malignant melanoma – which is basically skin cancer.

Shock: Last November, Molly-Mae was devastatingly diagnosed that a mole in her leg was malignant melanoma — a form of skin cancer

Shock: Last November, Molly-Mae was devastatingly diagnosed that a mole in her leg was malignant melanoma — a form of skin cancer

Shock: Last November, Molly-Mae was devastatingly diagnosed that a mole in her leg was malignant melanoma — a form of skin cancer

“It’s clearly frightening, shocking and scary. I don’t even know what to think or say. I can’t believe other doctors told me it was okay. I am so mad and angry.

“I just asked this doctor as I walked out. I walked around with skin cancer on my leg!’

“If I hadn’t asked, I still had that mole on my leg and I wouldn’t have learned it. It could spread through my body, you never know.’

Molly-Mae went on to explain how she tried to be strong despite collapsing so her loved ones wouldn’t panic.

She said, “I’ve already cried tears over it. I’ve already cried for every member of the family.’

Molly-Mae closed the video by urging her fans to get their moles checked.

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world, affecting more than two MILLION women every year

Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. There are over 55,000 new cases in the UK each year and the disease claims the lives of 11,500 women. In the US, it affects 266,000 and kills 40,000 each year. But what causes it and how can it be treated?

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer develops from a cancer cell that develops in the lining of a duct or lobule in one of the breasts.

When the breast cancer has spread to the surrounding breast tissue, it is called an ‘invasive’ breast cancer. Some people are diagnosed with “carcinoma in situ,” where no cancer cells have grown beyond the duct or lobe.

Most cases develop in women over the age of 50, but younger women are sometimes affected. Breast cancer can develop in men, although this is rare.

Staging means how big the cancer is and whether it has spread. Stage 1 is the earliest stage, and stage 4 means the cancer has spread to another part of the body.

The cancer cells are classified from low, meaning slow growth, to high, meaning fast growing. High-grade cancers are more likely to come back after being treated for the first time.

What Causes Breast Cancer?

A cancerous tumor starts with one abnormal cell. The exact reason why a cell becomes cancerous is unclear. It is thought that something damages or changes certain genes in the cell. This makes the cell abnormal and multiplies ‘out of control’.

While breast cancer can develop for no apparent reason, there are some risk factors that can increase the likelihood of developing breast cancer, such as genetics.

What are the symptoms of breast cancer?

The usual first symptom is a painless breast lump, although most breast lumps are not cancerous and are fluid-filled cysts, which are benign.

The first place breast cancer usually spreads to is the lymph nodes in the armpit. If this happens, you will get a swelling or lump in one armpit.

How is breast cancer diagnosed?

  • Initial assessment: A doctor examines the breasts and armpits. They may do tests such as a mammogram, which is a special X-ray of the breast tissue that can indicate the possibility of tumors.
  • Biopsy: A biopsy is when a small piece of tissue is removed from a part of the body. The sample is then examined under the microscope to look for abnormal cells. The sample can confirm or rule out cancer.

If you are diagnosed with breast cancer, further tests may be needed to assess whether it has spread. For example, blood tests, an ultrasound of the liver or a chest X-ray.

How is breast cancer treated?

Treatment options that may be considered include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormone treatment. Often a combination of two or more of these treatments is used.

  • Surgery: Breast-conserving surgery or removal of the affected breast, depending on the size of the tumor.
  • Radiotherapy: A treatment that uses high-energy beams of radiation that are aimed at cancer tissue. This kills cancer cells or stops cancer cells from multiplying. It is mainly used in addition to surgery.
  • Chemotherapy: a treatment for cancer using cancer drugs that kill or prevent cancer cells from multiplying
  • Hormone treatments: Some forms of breast cancer are influenced by the ‘female’ hormone oestrogen, which can stimulate the cancer cells to divide and multiply. Treatments that lower levels of these hormones or prevent them from working are commonly used in people with breast cancer.

How successful is the treatment?

The outlook is best in those who are diagnosed when the cancer is still small and has not spread. Surgical removal of a tumor at an early stage can then give a good chance of a cure.

With the routine mammography offered to women between the ages of 50 and 70, more early-stage breast cancers are being diagnosed and treated.

For more information visit breastcancercare.org.uk, breastcancernow.org or www.cancerhelp.org.uk

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