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MIT designed small inchworm-like robots to build space houses on Mars and houses on Earth

How houses are built on Mars: scientists design robots to build space houses and houses on Earth

  • V-shaped robots have two miniature arms and move like an inchworm
  • Opens and closes appendages to travel from one place to the next
  • Build structures one by one by moving parts to different locations
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From space homes to planes and houses on Earth – scientists have developed a new category of robots that can change the way we build high-quality structures.

The V-shaped machines, called Bipedal Isotropic Lattice Locomoting Explorers (or BILL-E), have two miniature arms that erect structures one by one.

With these accessories, robots can move like inchworms and open and close their bodies to travel from one place to another.

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The BILL-E robots have been developed by a team from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who provide these little robots that design everything from space sites on Mars to planes and houses on Earth.

Professor Neil Gershenfeld at the Center for Bits and Atoms of the MIT said: & # 39; The core of this is a new kind of robotics, which we call relative robots. & # 39;

He continued to explain that there have been two broad categories of robotics in the past – made from expensive custom components that have been carefully optimized for certain applications such as factory assembly, and made from inexpensive mass-produced modules with much lower performance.

However, the new robots have born a third category of robots.

The V-shaped machines, called Bipedal Isotropic Lattice Locomoting Explorers (or BILL-E), have two miniature arms that merge structures block by block

The V-shaped machines, called Bipedal Isotropic Lattice Locomoting Explorers (or BILL-E), have two miniature arms that merge structures block by block

The V-shaped machines, called Bipedal Isotropic Lattice Locomoting Explorers (or BILL-E), have two miniature arms that merge structures block by block

With these appendices the robots can move like inchworms, open and close their bodies to travel from one place to the next

With these appendices the robots can move like inchworms, open and close their bodies to travel from one place to the next

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With these appendices the robots can move like inchworms, open and close their bodies to travel from one place to the next

These bots are much simpler than the first, while they are much more capable than the last.

The inchworm-like robots can assemble smaller 3D pieces that the MIT team & # 39; voxels & # 39; to build the structures.

The robots are actually two connected small arms that pivot in the middle with a clamping device at each end that they use to grab onto the voxel structures.

With these appendages the robots can move like inchworms and open and close their bodies to move from one place to another.

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These components consist of simple struts and knots and can easily be attached to each other using simple locking systems.

And because the voxels are usually empty space, they are light in weight, but they can still be controlled to distribute loads efficiently.

The inchworm-like robots can assemble smaller 3D pieces that the MIT team & # 39; voxels & # 39; to build the structures. The robots are actually two connected small arms that pivot in the middle with a clip on each end that they use to grab onto the voxel structures

The inchworm-like robots can assemble smaller 3D pieces that the MIT team & # 39; voxels & # 39; to build the structures. The robots are actually two connected small arms that pivot in the middle with a clip on each end that they use to grab onto the voxel structures

The inchworm-like robots can assemble smaller 3D pieces that the MIT team & # 39; voxels & # 39; to build the structures. The robots are actually two connected small arms that pivot in the middle with a clip on each end that they use to grab onto the voxel structures

Every time the robot takes a step on the next voxel, it adjusts its sense of position to the structure on which it currently stands.

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The underlying vision is that just as the most complex images can be reproduced by using a series of pixels on a screen, almost any physical object can be recreated as a series of smaller three-dimensional pieces, which themselves can consist of simple struts and nodes .

While it is working on assembling the pieces, each of the little robots can count its steps across the structure, explained.

& # 39; It misses most common control systems, but as long as it does not miss a step, it knows where it is, & # 39; said Gershenfeld.

& # 39; Ultimately, such systems can be used to build entire buildings, especially in difficult environments such as in space, or on the moon or Mars. & # 39;

The main idea is to eliminate the need to ship large pre-assembled structures from the Earth, because these robots can build what is needed on the spaceship or the planet using batches of small subunits.

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