‘Mistress’ has been CANCELED: AP Stylebook bans the use of the term because it ‘implies the woman is to blame’

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The Associated Press is being ridiculed online after the style guide removes the term ‘mistress’ from the lexicon because the word ‘implies that the woman was solely responsible for the affair’.

Instead, the AP Stylebook, which is used by journalists and writers as a sort of universal guideline, recommends replacing the term with gender-neutral words like “companion,” “friend,” or “lover.”

The AP initially advised dropping the term “ mistress ” last year, but a tweet reminding the public of the change went viral on Wednesday.

“Don’t use the term mistress for a woman who has a long-term sexual relationship with and is financially supported by a man who is married to someone else,” the AP tweeted.

The Associated Press is being ridiculed online after the style guide removes the term 'mistress' from the lexicon because the word 'implies that the woman was solely responsible for the affair'.

The Associated Press is being ridiculed online after the style guide removes the term ‘mistress’ from the lexicon because the word ‘implies that the woman was solely responsible for the affair’.

The AP initially advised dropping the term `` mistress '' last year, but a tweet reminding the public of the change went viral on Wednesday.

The AP initially advised dropping the term “ mistress ” last year, but a tweet reminding the public of the change went viral on Wednesday.

“Instead, use an alternative such as a companion, friend, or loved one at the first reference and provide additional details later.”

In a follow-up tweet, the agency wrote, “We understand it’s problematic that the alternative terms fall short.

“But we felt that was better than having one word for a woman and not a word for the man, and suggesting that the woman alone was responsible for the affair.”

On Twitter, social media users mock the AP. Mark Harris from New York City chuckled, “Yeah, definitely use ‘friend,’ the term the man uses to explain himself. That is much less sexist. ‘

Christian Schneider believes that a synonym for mistress should be ‘homewrecker’.

Joe Cunningham tweeted, “The preferred gender-neutral wording is” Sugar Baby. “

“The word for the husband is” adulterer, “wrote one Twitter user.

Another Twitter user suggested ‘mister-ess’ as an alternative.

Matt Comer thinks the AP should simply adopt the term ‘paramour’, which is ‘just waiting to be plucked from the dictionary.’

The AP initially advised dropping the term `` mistress '' last year, but a tweet reminding the public of the change went viral on Wednesday.

The AP initially advised dropping the term “ mistress ” last year, but a tweet reminding the public of the change went viral on Wednesday.

A Twitter user claimed to have been cheated on by her husband. She said the deletion of the term “mistress” relieves the other woman of her responsibility.

“ For some of us spouses cheated on, the affair partner knew we existed and met us and our kids, ” wrote a woman using Twitter manager Jess.

While I agree it takes two, she also knew what she was doing.

“Besides, she was also married and my husband didn’t take care of it financially because she had her own job.”

Katherine Neukomm tweeted, “Rather than dilute words about love and friendship that none of the burning vitriol mistresses so often earn, perhaps an equivalent term for a man should be coined.”

Another Twitter user, Carl Feher, commented, “Congratulations, you turned it into a problem.”

One Twitter user suggested that AP simply takes ‘adulterer’ or ‘impostor’ as the male equivalent of ‘mistress’.

Another Twitter user hilariously offered terms like “gigolo,” “saved man,” “fancy man,” “toy boy,” or “cabana boy.”

Joe Cunningham tweeted: 'The preferred gender-neutral wording is

Joe Cunningham tweeted, “The preferred gender-neutral wording is” Sugar Baby. “

'The word for the man is "adulterer, ”wrote one Twitter user.

“The word for the husband is” adulterer, “wrote one Twitter user.

Another Twitter user hilariously offered terms like

Another Twitter user hilariously offered terms like “gigolo,” “saved man,” “fancy man,” “toy boy,” or “cabana boy.”

Twitter user Stephanie Ireland opined: 'The married man has a name.  Adulterer, cheater, motherfucker.  '

Twitter user Stephanie Ireland opined: ‘The married man has a name. Adulterer, cheater, motherfucker. ‘

Katherine Neukomm tweeted,

Katherine Neukomm tweeted, “Rather than dilute words about love and friendship that none of the burning vitriol mistresses so often earn, perhaps an equivalent term for a man should be coined.”

One Twitter user suggested that AP simply takes 'adulterer' or 'impostor' as the male equivalent of 'mistress'.

One Twitter user suggested that AP simply takes ‘adulterer’ or ‘impostor’ as the male equivalent of ‘mistress’.

Another Twitter user, Carl Feher, commented,

Another Twitter user, Carl Feher, commented, “Congratulations, you turned it into a problem.”

Another Twitter user suggested 'mister-ess' as an alternative.

Another Twitter user suggested ‘mister-ess’ as an alternative.

A Twitter user claimed to have been cheated on by her husband.  She said the deletion of the term

A Twitter user claimed to have been cheated on by her husband. She said the deletion of the term “mistress” relieves the other woman of her responsibility.

Twitter user Stephanie Ireland opined: ‘The married man has a name. Adulterer, cheater, motherfucker. ‘

The AP style book has tried to make changes in response to current trends.

In November, the terms “insane,” “crazy,” “crazy,” and “crazy” were removed – unless the terms were used in quotes.

“Avoid using mental health terms to describe unrelated problems,” the AP said.

“Don’t say an award ceremony was schizophrenic, for example.”

In July, AP changed its style to capitalize the ‘b’ in ‘Black’ when referring to people of color.

The change was made during the massive nationwide protests in the wake of the May police-implicated murder of George Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, in Minneapolis.

The term ‘white’ remains controversial when referring to whites in lowercase.

AP’s style now is to capitalize black in a racial, ethnic or cultural sense, and convey an essential and shared sense of history, identity and community among people who identify as black, including those in the African diaspora and in Africa ‘the agency announced. at that moment.

The little black is a color, not a person.

“AP style will continue to use the term white in a racial, ethnic and cultural sense.”

For those with a conservative political bias, the changes merely confirm a liberal bias.

In recent years, the AP Stylebook has urged authors to avoid the term ‘pro-life’ and use ‘anti-abortion’ instead.

It also recommends that writers use the terms “militant” or “attacker” instead of words like “terrorists.”

The terms “illegal immigrant” and “undocumented” are not used by AP.