Miso Robotics presents kitchen bot on a rail that can slide from side to side to fry different foods

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Miso Robotics presents a new kitchen robot connected to a rail that can slide from side to side to fry different foods and prepare hundreds of orders every hour

  • The new bot is a robotic arm mounted on rails that can fry food and slide sideways.
  • Miso says he prepares hundreds of orders in an hour and could be launched this year.
  • At $ 30,000 it will be cheaper than its predecessor, Flippy, which is double the price.

The creators of the hamburger flipping robot, ‘Flippy’ are adding another high-power kitchen assistant to their line.

The bot, described by Miso Robotics this week, is a prototype called ROAR, which means Robot on a Rail, and seeks to condense the previous systems designed by Miso into a cheaper and more space-friendly product.

ROAR, unlike a ground-mounted predecessor, Flippy, can be connected to a typical hood seen inside a commercial kitchen and is capable of launching at different stations by sliding its robotic arm through a rail.

Above is an official representation of Miso Robotics of ROAR. The robotic arms are equipped with a rail and can slide from side to side to prepare and fry food.

Above is an official representation of Miso Robotics of ROAR. The robotic arms are equipped with a rail and can slide from side to side to prepare and fry food.

With its mobility, speed and software improvement, Miso says ROAR can fry various types of food, including chicken, wings, tater-tots and even popcorn.

Given its smaller footprint in kitchens and lower hardware requirements, Miso says that the bot, which it says will reach commercial markets by the end of the year, will also cost about $ 30,000, half of Flippy.

While Miso did not provide specific numbers on how many orders ROAR can complete in an hour outside of ‘hundreds’, Flippy, an autonomous arm of similar design, has the ability to roast about 150 hamburgers per hour.

Flippy began to find commercial success in fast order restaurants and found a partner at retail giant Walmart last year.

In the Walmart deli, Flippy transfers chicken fillets, mozzarella sticks and potato wedges to the appropriate fryers, using visual recognition technology to ensure that each food goes to the correct basket.

The arm then ‘waves’ each basket to make sure it cooks evenly, according to Yahoo Finance.

Once the food is cooked, Flippy moves the basket to a drying rack, while a Walmart employee tests the temperature of the food.

Above are previous units of Miso Robotics, which manufactures 'Flippy', a hamburger bot that has had some commercial success.

Above are previous units of Miso Robotics, which manufactures 'Flippy', a hamburger bot that has had some commercial success.

Above are previous units of Miso Robotics, which manufactures ‘Flippy’, a hamburger bot that has had some commercial success.

Then, the employee can add seasoning to the food and move it to the showcase in the deli for purchase.

Walmart approached Miso Robotics with the idea of ​​taking Flippy to their stores after successful tests at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles.

The company says it has extended Flippy contracts at Dodger Stadium, Chase Field of the Arizona Diamondbacks and several CaliBurger locations in the US. UU.

Miso is not alone in its search to automate strips of commercial kitchens.

At CES this year, companies such as Picnic showed improvements in their pizza making robot, an autonomous unit that assembles and cooks pizzas in the desired style.

Along the same lines, Samsung introduced a personal kitchen robot that can cut tofu and apply ingredients to simple dishes.

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