Advertisements
Milwaukee has warned people to & # 39; immediately & # 39; to stop vaping in the midst of an outbreak of serious lung disease, while US health officials are rushing to investigate at least one death and nearly 200 hospital admissions related to the use of e-cigarettes
Advertisements

Milwaukee has warned people to & # 39; immediately & # 39; to stop vaping amid an outbreak of serious pulmonary disease, while US health officials are rushing to investigate at least one death and nearly 200 hospital admissions related to the use of e-cigarettes.

The health warning issued in Milwaukee on Wednesday comes after 16 people were hospitalized this month with serious lung diseases.

Those admitted to the hospital, including both adults and teenagers, all said they had smoked e-cigarettes or used marijuana oil and extracts in the weeks or months before.

They suffered from a series of pulmonary diseases, including severe chemical pneumonia, and had reported difficulty breathing and chest pain prior to admission.

Advertisements

The health commissioner urged residents to immediately stop smoking vape or e-cigarette devices and warned that serious lung diseases were detected in teenagers and adults who reported vapes.

The warning from the largest city in Wisconsin comes when federal health officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Food and Drug Administration continue to investigate nationwide an outbreak of serious cases of pulmonary disease.

At least one death and nearly 200 cases of pulmonary disease associated with pulmonary disease have been reported in recent weeks.

Milwaukee has warned people to & # 39; immediately & # 39; to stop vaping in the midst of an outbreak of serious lung disease, while US health officials are rushing to investigate at least one death and nearly 200 hospital admissions related to the use of e-cigarettes

Milwaukee has warned people to & # 39; immediately & # 39; to stop vaping in the midst of an outbreak of serious lung disease, while US health officials are rushing to investigate at least one death and nearly 200 hospital admissions related to the use of e-cigarettes

Advertisements

These cases cover 22 states, including California, Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Michigan, North Carolina, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin.

Although the diseases have been reported since the end of June, the total number has increased rapidly in the last two weeks.

Officials revealed last week that a patient in Illinois had died of a severe lung disease contracted after vaping. The Illinois Department of Public Health said it was the first death in the US related to the smoking alternative.

They try to find out which specific evaporation products were used in that case, as well as the others, and whether they were used as intended or mixed with other substances.

So far, federal and national researchers have not linked the diseases to a specific product, but they have said that some patients reported vape with cannabis liquids.

Advertisements

Electronic cigarettes have been described as a less dangerous alternative to regular cigarettes, but health officials are concerned about children using them.

Most of the care is focused on nicotine, which health officials say is harmful to brain development and that children are more likely to use cigarettes.

However, some vapor products were found to contain other potentially harmful substances, including flavorings and oils used to evaporate marijuana.

A number of people who fell ill had evaporated products containing THC, the high-inducing ingredient in marijuana.

CDC officials said they do not yet know exactly how many of the patients have used THC.

Advertisements

Chance Ammirata (18), a Florida student, revealed earlier this month that he was suffering from a collapsing lung due to the chemicals in his mint Juul pods.

Juul is currently fighting various lawsuits that claim that teenagers have become addicted to nicotine by portraying their e-cigarettes as a trend setting and stylish

Juul is currently fighting various lawsuits that claim that teenagers have become addicted to nicotine by portraying their e-cigarettes as a trend setting and stylish

Juul is currently fighting various lawsuits that claim that teenagers have become addicted to nicotine by portraying their e-cigarettes as a trend setting and stylish

Dominant e-cigarette manufacturers have recently devoted more and more attention to the health effects of their products and also to their research and marketing practices. Last year, Juul had to delete many of his messages on social media (above) after being confronted with allegations they target young people with their advertisements

Dominant e-cigarette manufacturers have recently devoted more and more attention to the health effects of their products and also to their research and marketing practices. Last year, Juul had to delete many of his messages on social media (above) after being confronted with allegations they target young people with their advertisements

Dominant e-cigarette manufacturers have recently devoted more and more attention to the health effects of their products and also to their research and marketing practices. Last year, Juul had to delete many of his messages on social media (above) after being confronted with allegations they target young people with their advertisements

Investigation into the outbreak of pulmonary disease

Advertisements

Federal health officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Food and Drug Administration are currently investigating the outbreak of serious lung diseases in the US.

Since June, at least one death and nearly 200 cases of pulmonary-related diseases have been reported.

These cases cover 22 states, including California, Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Michigan, North Carolina, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, and Wisconsin.

Officials revealed last week that a patient in Illinois had died of a severe lung disease contracted after vaping.

In many cases, patients reported a gradual onset of symptoms, including breathing difficulties, shortness of breath, and / or chest pain before admission to the hospital.

Advertisements

Some cases also reported mild to moderate gastrointestinal disorders, including vomiting and diarrhea and fatigue.

So far, federal and national researchers have not linked the diseases to a specific product, but they have said that some patients reported vape with cannabis liquids.

He told DailyMail.com that he was vaping about one Juul pod every two days, which is about the equivalent of 10 cigarettes worth of nicotine a day when he got seriously ill.

He said he had never smoked cigarettes and started using his Juul 18 months ago.

Ammirata said he believed that using his Juul was safer than cigarette smoking.

Advertisements

& # 39; Juul really manipulates it as if it is good and it is not and there is not enough evidence, but I feel it is my responsibility as a victim & # 39; to let people know it's not safe, & he said.

Dominant e-cigarette manufacturers have recently devoted more and more attention to the health effects of their products and also to their research and marketing practices.

Juul, for example, is currently fighting various lawsuits that claim that teenagers have become addicted to nicotine by portraying their e-cigarettes as a trend setting and stylish.

Kevin Burns, Juul's CEO, acknowledged on Thursday that the series of illnesses reported across the country were "worrying" & # 39; was, but said he does not believe that his company's products are to blame.

He defended his product and told it CBS This morning Juul cooperates with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to investigate the wave of diseases.

Advertisements

Burns also denied claims in the various lawsuits that Juul is targeting young people in their marketing, and says his company never deliberately targeted teenagers to grow their product.

& # 39; As a parent of a 16-year-old, 19-year-old, I don't want my children to use the product. It is not meant for them, & Burns said. & # 39; It is not smokers or former smokers who attempt to use the product. We never want them to use the product. & # 39;

Burns then apologized for every parent whose children became addicted to smoking e-cigarettes.

& # 39; I have empathy for them, for what they are going through, dealing with their children trying to go through all kinds of problems, especially an addiction to a product with nicotine in it, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; I am sorry for their situation.

Advertisements

& # 39; The company never intended to focus on the youth to grow our product. & # 39;

He refused to label the situation as an epidemic, crisis or emergency, but admitted & # 39; we must act quickly and urgently & # 39 ;.

Juul CEO Kevin Burns says his company never intended to use their e-cigarettes with children, nor does he want his own teenagers to use them. He refused to label the situation as an epidemic, crisis or emergency, but admitted & # 39; we must act quickly and urgently & # 39;

Juul CEO Kevin Burns says his company never intended to use their e-cigarettes with children, nor does he want his own teenagers to use them. He refused to label the situation as an epidemic, crisis or emergency, but admitted & # 39; we must act quickly and urgently & # 39;

Juul CEO Kevin Burns says his company never intended to use their e-cigarettes with children, nor does he want his own teenagers to use them. He refused to label the situation as an epidemic, crisis or emergency, but admitted & # 39; we must act quickly and urgently & # 39;

federal and national researchers have not linked the diseases to a specific product, but they have said that some patients reported vape with cannabis liquids

federal and national researchers have not linked the diseases to a specific product, but they have said that some patients reported vape with cannabis liquids

Advertisements

federal and national researchers have not linked the diseases to a specific product, but they have said that some patients reported vape with cannabis liquids

Juul pods have nearly killed me: the lung of 18-year-old university student FALLEN after a year of vaping

By Natalie Rahhal Deputy Health Editor for Dailymail.com

Chance Ammirata (18), a Florida student, revealed earlier this month that he was suffering from a collapsing lung due to the chemicals in his mint Juul pods.

He told DailyMail.com that he was vaping about one Juul pod every two days, which is about the equivalent of 10 cigarettes worth of nicotine a day when he got seriously ill.

He said he had never smoked cigarettes and started using his Juul 18 months ago.

Photos & # 39; s of the operation to permanently blow up Chance & # 39; s lungs, the black & # 39; dots & # 39; of damage left by nicotine and chemicals (above) and the hole they have through his lung (below)

Photos & # 39; s of the operation to permanently blow up Chance & # 39; s lungs, the black & # 39; dots & # 39; of damage left by nicotine and chemicals (above) and the hole they have through his lung (below)

Photos & # 39; s of the operation to permanently blow up Chance & # 39; s lungs, the black & # 39; dots & # 39; of damage left by nicotine and chemicals (above) and the hole they have through his lung (below)

The teenager assumed he had just pulled a muscle when he started to feel pain, but it got worse over the course of five hours.

His friends eventually brought him to the hospital, where doctors told him that his left lung had collapsed. He had to undergo emergency surgery to repair the damage.

Ammirata said he believed that using his Juul was safer than cigarette smoking. He shared images of damage to his lungs on social media to warn others.

& # 39; There is such a stereotype that it is safe and my whole reason (to speak out) is to warn people that it is not safe, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; Juul really manipulates it as if it is good and it is not and there is not enough evidence, but I feel it is my responsibility as a victim & # 39; to let people know it's not safe, & he said.

Juul has revealed that it is implementing a new ID technology that makes it harder for minors to buy and also limits the amount of people who can buy.

The company said that more than 40,000 stores that sell their product have already agreed to implement the new technology. Juul said it plans to stop distributing its products to those stores that do not conform in 2021.

The CEO's comments come after a Missouri-based mother, Mindy Boyd, filed a federal lawsuit this week accusing her of developing a marketing strategy aimed at teenagers after her own 14-year-old daughter started to vape with Juul products.

The lawsuit, filed with the US District Court in Kansas City and seeking class action, claims that the teenager has become addicted to nicotine and has been unable to quit.

It claims that Juul wanted to radiate his e-cigarettes as a trendsetter and stylish.

The lawsuit states that Boyd's daughter spends money on the e-cigarette products every week and photographs of her and her & # 39; JUULING & # 39; published on social media.

Boyd claims that her daughter & # 39; became more ill & # 39 ;, & # 39; unusually irritable and anxious & # 39; and & # 39; often has a headache & # 39 ;.

The lawsuit alleges that Juul was aware of & # 39; significant health risk & # 39; s due to nicotine use & # 39; and & # 39; developed an e-cigarette that is more powerful than all other & # 39 ;.

& # 39; Like large tobacco, Juul focused on America & # 39; s youth, hoping to win customers for life, and it worked & # 39 ;, said the lawsuit.

The suit claims that the company & # 39; is deliberately trivialized, misrepresented, hidden and has not warned about the increased risk of exposure to nicotine and addiction & # 39 ;.

Juul captured 70% of the US e-cigarette market in October 2018, according to Nielsen data, and its emergence has closely followed an explosion of minor vapors.

The Attorney General of North Carolina has also filed lawsuits against manufacturers, including Juul, in his attempt to stop the sale of e-cigarettes to teenagers.

Josh Stein claims that social media companies advertise young people with candy and dessert flavors and do not use correct age verification for sale.

& # 39; We just can't let a new generation of young people become addicted to nicotine, & # 39; said Stein.

His lawsuits are focused on Juul, Beard Vape, Direct eLiquid, Electric Lotus, Electric Tobacconist, Eonsmoke, Juice Man, Tinted Brew and VapeCo.

Bruce Gibson, CEO of Electric Tobacconist USA, issued a statement on Tuesday stating that the online store & # 39; extensive & # 39; age verification used by a third party who uses a driver's license, voter registration, and other data to verify that buyers are adults.

& # 39; We absolutely confirm that these products are not in the hands of children & # 39 ;, he said.

Last year, one in five American high school students reported using e-cigarettes last month, according to government figures.

Juul has become a scourge in American schools where students vape in toilets, corridors and even classrooms.

The number of young people and teenagers reporting vapes regularly increased by 900 percent between 2011 and 2015, according to the Surgeon General's office.

Last year, Juul had to remove almost all of his social media and was asked to handle documents that made his marketing practice known to the FDA.

What is an e-cigarette and how does it differ from smoking tobacco?

An electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) is a device that allows users to inhale nicotine by heating a vapor from a solution containing nicotine, propylene and flavorings.

Because there is no burning, there is no smoke like a traditional cigarette.

But although they are branded as a lower risk than cigarettes, an increasing stream of investigations shows health hazards.

E-cigarettes do not produce tar or carbon monoxide, but the vapor does contain some harmful chemicals.

Nicotine is the highly addictive chemical that makes it difficult for smokers to quit.

Nearly three million people in the UK use e-cigarettes and more than nine million Americans.

TYPES:

1. Standard e-cigarette

Battery-powered device containing nicotine e-liquid.

It evaporates flavored nicotine liquid.

2. Juul

Very similar to normal e-cigarettes, but with a slimmer design and a higher concentration of nicotine.

Thanks to the & # 39; nicotine salts & # 39; manufacturers claim that one pod delivers the amount of nicotine as a pack of cigarettes.

It consists of an e-cigarette (battery and temperature control) and a pod e-liquid that is introduced at the end.

The liquid contains nicotine, chemicals and flavorings.

Like other evaporation devices, it evaporates the e-liquid.

3. IQOS by Philip Morris

Pen-shaped, charged like an iPod.

Evaporated tobacco.

It is known as a & # 39; heat not burn & # 39; smokeless device that heats but does not burn tobacco (at 350 ° C compared to 600 ° C as normal cigarettes do).

The company claims that this method reduces the exposure of users to carcinogenic burning tobacco.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) health