Millennials are less likely to count family members as their best friends than a decade ago

Millennials are less likely to count family members as their best friends than a decade ago, and social networks were blamed for the weakening of family ties

  • Report showed that leaving home to go to college or living in major cities weakens ties
  • The findings of the Intergenerational Foundation have provoked warnings of loneliness
  • Friendships between families decreased from 2005 to 2015, a new fall since 1995

Victoria Allen for the Daily Mail

Millennials are much less likely to name a relative as one of their best friends than a decade ago.

As more people leave home to go to college or move to major cities, people less than 20 years old report less often than they are close friends of their parents, siblings or relatives.

The findings, from the Intergenerational Foundation, have provoked warnings that loneliness is increasing among young people.

It has been discovered that Millennials are less likely to name a family member as a close friend than a decade ago. It is believed that leaving home to go to college or living in major cities is behind weakened ties.

It has been discovered that Millennials are less likely to name a family member as a close friend than a decade ago. It is believed that leaving home to go to college or living in major cities is behind weakened ties.

It has been discovered that Millennials are less likely to name a family member as a close friend than a decade ago. It is believed that leaving home to go to college or living in major cities is behind weakened ties.

The greater use of social networks to talk with friends online can also be affecting family relationships. The findings of the Intergenerational Foundation have provoked warnings about loneliness

The greater use of social networks to talk with friends online can also be affecting family relationships. The findings of the Intergenerational Foundation have provoked warnings about loneliness

The greater use of social networks to talk with friends online can also be affecting family relationships. The findings of the Intergenerational Foundation have provoked warnings about loneliness

The use of social networks to talk with friends online can weaken family ties, although the report recognizes that social networks can also help family members stay in touch.

The charity discovered that friendships between families decreased from 2005 to 2015, after having fallen from 1995 onwards.

Angus Hanton, co-founder of the Intergenerational Foundation, said: "Little has been done to analyze the plight of young people specifically when they are experiencing such high levels of loneliness and social isolation."

The study was based on the analysis of the British Household Panel Survey in 1995, 2005 and 2015.

In general, people aged 20 and over in 2015 had 10% lower overall scores of economic well-being, health, relationship, personnel, environment and belonging, compared to people of this age in previous decades.

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