Migrant from India spends $ 20,000 during Melbourne lockdown to restore 1970 Ford tractor

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The moving motivation for truckie who spent $ 20,000 to restore a worn-out 1970s Ford tractor

  • Indian migrant restored vintage Ford tractor during Melbourne lockdown
  • Jaskaran Brar grew up on a farm and said he has a deep connection with tractors
  • The rebuilding of the suburbs took about 10 months and cost more than $ 20,000

Months of hard work during Melbourne’s grueling Covid lockdown have finally paid for an Indian migrant who spent time in isolation restoring a vintage tractor – even though he doesn’t live on a farm.

Jaskaran Brar spent about $ 20,000 in the space of about 10 months building the 1970 Ford 3000 tractor at his Doveton home, in southeast Melbourne.

While he loves his new home, Down Under, the Punjabi native, who grew up on a farm in Bhaloor village in Moga district, said he misses his father in the paddy fields and riding the tractor.

Jaskaran Brar spent about $ 20,000 refurbishing the 1970 Ford 3000 tractor (pictured) at his Doveton home, southeast Melbourne, over a grueling period of about 10 months.

Jaskaran Brar spent about $ 20,000 refurbishing the 1970 Ford 3000 tractor (pictured) at his Doveton home, southeast Melbourne, over a grueling period of about 10 months.

He traveled 400 km from his home to retrieve the broken tractor that was in 'terrible condition'

He traveled 400 km from his home to retrieve the broken tractor that was in 'terrible condition'

He traveled 400 km from his home to retrieve the broken tractor that was in ‘terrible condition’

His agricultural upbringing created a strong bond with farm equipment which he sadly lost when he came to Australia in 2008.

‘I miss those good old days in the fields. But what I miss most is our Ford tractor that my family has used at home for many years, ”he said SBS Punjabi

‘It’s just a tractor to most, but to me it’s an integral part of our family. Our Ford tractor has played an important role in shaping our lives. ‘

Armed with basic qualifications in mechanical engineering and agricultural machinery, Brar decided to rekindle his passion in the midst of the pandemic.

He traveled 400 km from his home to retrieve the broken tractor that was in ‘terrible condition’.

Although Mr. Brar (pictured) loves his new home Down Under, the Punjabi native, who grew up on a farm in the village of Bhaloor in the Moga district, said he was missing his father in the rice paddies and driving on the tractor is missing

Although Mr. Brar (pictured) loves his new home Down Under, the Punjabi native, who grew up on a farm in the village of Bhaloor in the Moga district, said he was missing his father in the rice paddies and driving on the tractor is missing.

Although Mr. Brar (pictured) loves his new home Down Under, the Punjabi native, who grew up on a farm in the village of Bhaloor in the Moga district, said he was missing his father in the rice paddies and driving on the tractor is missing

Mr. Brar sourced most of the spare parts he needed from all over Melbourne, but to keep it as authentic as possible, he also sent parts away from the Punjab town of Nakodar.

Now that it’s finally ready, he plans to exhibit the DIY beast at farm fairs across Australia.

He says his family couldn’t be more proud of what he has achieved at home.

“My family, especially my father in Punjab, are delighted that I am continuing the family tradition of owning a blue Ford here in Australia too,” said Mr Brar.

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