Michigan & # 39; s & # 39; Patient Zero & # 39; for measles: Israeli charity worker traveling to the US to raise funds

Michigan & # 39; s & # 39; Patient Zero & # 39; for measles: Israeli charity who travels to the US to raise funds in orthodox communities has inadvertently created an outbreak of 38 cases in Detroit after a doctor had rejected his symptoms of bronchitis

  • The Israeli traveler arrived in New York in November, when the measles outbreak began to crash in Brooklyn
  • At the beginning of March he drove to Detroit at night and he felt feverish with a cough
  • He went to the doctor when he arrived, but was told that he had bronchitis and took antibiotics
  • The next day he got a rash, but the doctor said they were allergies
  • Hours later, the doctor realized that it might have been measles but could not reach him then
  • When the Michigan authorities had worked it out, he had been there for a week and had contact with hundreds of people

A man traveling the country to raise funds for charity in Orthodox Jewish communities is responsible for 38 measles cases in Michigan after he drove from Brooklyn to Detroit for a business trip full of community gatherings.

The Israeli traveler, by the Washington Post & # 39; Michigan & # 39; s Patient Zero & # 39; called, arrived in New York in November, when the measles outbreak began to crash in Brooklyn, and he stayed until March.

The Michigan authorities needed a week to realize that he could be the source – by then, the Post reported, he had interacted with & # 39; hundreds of people & # 39; visited three times a day at the synagogue, kosher markets, and in the homes of the people.

The man who went to a doctor to check his measles status was & # 39; devastated & # 39; when he realized that he was the source of a new outbreak, the health authorities of Michigan said.

The Israeli traveler arrived in New York in November, when the measles outbreak began to crash in Brooklyn. He went to Michigan in early March and was there a week before the diagnosis (file image)

The Israeli traveler arrived in New York in November, when the measles outbreak began to crash in Brooklyn. He went to Michigan in early March and was there a week before the diagnosis (file image)

On the night he set out for his night drive from New York to Michigan, he had a fever and a heavy cough – two classic measles symptoms – so he immediately went to see a doctor when he arrived, the Post reported.

His concerns were rejected. The doctor gave him antibiotics for bronchitis.

The next day, the man called the doctor's office and said he had developed a rash. The doctor said it had to be an allergic reaction and nothing to worry about.

With the doctor's confidence, the man continued his busy events program in Oakland County, where Detroit is, including daily visits to synagogues, and staying in people's homes.

But shortly after their phone call, the doctor had a moment of realization: it could be measles.

He called back. The man's phone, which did not work, went directly to the voicemail, so he called the authorities.

According to the Post, his call was answered by the perfect person: Steve McGraw, not only head of emergency medical services, but also part of the Orthodox Jewish community of Oakland County, who immediately contacted all rabbis in the area.

His contacts in the community knew exactly who he was talking about and sent him to the neighborhood where the man was on that day.

McGraw told the Post that he was confident that he could find the man because he knew the man was driving in a blue sedan and he knew that he would stand out among the minivans used by almost every family. ;

They succeeded him within a few hours and told him what had happened, to his horror.