Michael Che hits back at allegations of his ‘Gen Z Hospital’ sketch on SNL ‘appropriated black culture’

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Michael Che has come back to online criticism of a sketch he wrote for Saturday Night Live last week after it was accused of embezzling black culture.

The star took to Instagram on Monday to defend the ‘Gen Z Hospital’ sketch, in which guest host Elon Musk and other cast members used slang phrases while sitting in a waiting room.

Critics online dismissed the script for the fact that phrases from African American Vernacular English (AAVE) were spoken by the mostly white cast.

Che said in a since-deleted Instagram post that he wrote the sketch – saying he’d never heard of the term AAVE.

He wrote, ‘I have read that my’ gene z ‘sketch is abusing AAVE. And I was stunned because what’s the f *** AAVE?

‘I had to look it up. Turns out it’s short for African American Vernacular English. You know, AAVE! That old saying that real black people use in conversations all the time. ‘

Che added: ‘I love AAVE. AAVE to the moon. ‘

Michael Che, who co-hosts Saturday Night Live's 'Weekend Update', took to Instagram to respond to criticism over a sketch he wrote for the May 8 episode

Michael Che, who co-hosts Saturday Night Live’s ‘Weekend Update’, took to Instagram to respond to criticism over a sketch he wrote for the May 8 episode

The 'Gen Z Hospital' sketch featured cast members, most of whom were white, and used terms related to African American local English, such as 'cringe', 'bro' and 'bestie'.

The ‘Gen Z Hospital’ sketch featured cast members, most of whom were white, and used terms related to African American local English, such as ‘cringe’, ‘bro’ and ‘bestie’.

Che said in a since-deleted Instagram post that he wrote the sketch - saying he'd never heard of the term AAVE

Che said in a since-deleted Instagram post that he wrote the sketch – saying he’d never heard of the term AAVE

The sketch featured Musk and cast members Kate McKinnon, Mikey Day, Heidi Gardner, Ego Nwodim and Bowen Yang in the waiting room of a hospital as they waited for news of Day’s mother’s condition.

It starts with Mikey Day’s character saying, ‘Bro, nobody’s telling us anything. Is bestie okay? ‘

When the nurse, played by Melissa Villasenor, tells them she has no news, Bowen Yang’s character says, ‘I’m so under pressure now’ and Heidi Gardner’s character said the doctor would ‘catch hands’ if he did. did not. come out with information soon.

When the doctor, played by Musk, comes out, he tells the group, “What I have to say now may cringe a bit.”

He said they tried everything during the operation and “it was a ‘sus’ for a while.”

When Gardener’s character asks if they can see the patient, Musk replies, “Not now, bro, you know the vibes.”

To thank him, McKinnon tells Musk, “We stand you,” to which Musk says, “I can only imagine the feeling you’re going through now.”

Those terms – as well as ‘go off’, ‘high key’ and ‘fire’, which are also used in the sketch – are used in African American local English, leading some to claim on Twitter that Saturday Night Live is committed to black culture. -own.

Some people took to Twitter after the sketch aired to call it black culture appropriation

Some people took to Twitter after the sketch aired to call it black culture appropriation

“AAVE is not = Gen Z,” wrote one user, @magi_jay. “AAVE is a cluster of dialects in which there are generational differences, especially in vocabulary, just as there are within any dialect of a language.”

African American vernacular English has its own grammatical features and was developed from a variety of cultural influences used by enslaved people, according to The hill.

“And most white Gen-Zers don’t speak AAVE fluently,” continued @magi_jay. “This sounds like a bunch of people faking French accents.”

Another user, with the username JaLoni, tweeted, ‘I don’t watch SNL because it’s just not funny, but like … that sketch is so disturbing because AAVE is separated enough from black people (by appropriation) that [it’s] ‘Gen Z language’ but not enough that black people are no longer mocked. ‘

Aditya Mukerjee meanwhile called the sketch ‘gross’.

“But besides,” she wrote, “the SNL skit reads as if they just took a list of terms from Urban Dictionary and sprinkled it in, it doesn’t matter that AAVE has any defined grammar.”

In response, Che wrote on Instagram: “Look, the sketch bombed, I’m used to that,” said People, with the caption ‘If I could stop one person from calling everyone bro and bestie, I’m happy with that’.

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