Advertisements
Tony Walker (photo above) was known for his dream of becoming a jockey and now works as a taxi driver

We have followed their lives since they were only seven years old, through their school days, to both their joys and disappointments about their later lives.

Advertisements

Now the participants of one of the longest running documentary series in TV, 7UP, can be seen in a final part of the show.

The ITV documentary, directed by Michael Apted, will return to our screens next week to watch the cast again when they reach 63.

The three remaining original cast members – Sue Davis, Bruce Balden and Tony Walker – accompanied Apted in talking about the fight against age prior to the show's broadcast.

To celebrate the latest installment in the longest-running documentary series in TV history, famous show fans are also featured in a spin-off & # 39; 7UP and Me & # 39; to explain why it means so much to them. They also provide a personal insight into how the program reflects the most important milestones of their own lives.

Celebrity guests include Sadie Frost, Stanley Johnson, Julia Bradbury, Eamon Holmes and Michelle Gomez.

One of the cast members, Tony Walker, who was known for achieving his dream of becoming a jockey, told Radio Times that he would do another series if & # 39; the same crew is still there & # 39 ;.

Advertisements

Tony Walker (photo above) was known for his dream of becoming a jockey and now works as a taxi driver

Tony Walker (photo above) was known for his dream of becoming a jockey and now works as a taxi driver

Eastender Tony Walker said he would do another series if & # 39; the same crew is still there & # 39; but the recognized age was a factor

Eastender Tony Walker said he would do another series if & # 39; the same crew is still there & # 39; but the recognized age was a factor

In the original 7 Up Walker it became known for achieving his dream of becoming a jockey

In the original 7 Up Walker it became known for achieving his dream of becoming a jockey

Eastender Tony Walker (left, now) said he would do another series if & # 39; the same crew is still there & # 39; but the recognized age was a factor. Shown on the right when the documentary was filmed

Sue Davis said: “I am personally in a good place, but it is going to get worse. You become sicker and older & # 39;

Sue Davis said: “I am personally in a good place, but it is going to get worse. You become sicker and older & # 39;

Davis (photo) played in 7 Up as a schoolgirl alongside her friends the late Lynn Johnson and Jackie Bassett

Davis (photo) played in 7 Up as a schoolgirl alongside her friends the late Lynn Johnson and Jackie Bassett

Advertisements

Sue Davis (left, now) said: & I am personally in a good place, but it is going to get worse. You become sicker and older & # 39 ;. Shown on the right when the documentary was filmed

Bruce Balden as a child

Bruce Balden as a child

Bruce Balden now

Bruce Balden now

Bruce Balden (shown as a child on the show) had also appeared in the documentary. As a child he was concerned with poverty. He now works as a teacher and is married with children (now, now 63 years old)

But he said: & # 39; Seven to 70 & # 39; has received a good signal. (But) you have to look at Michael, who is now 77. & # 39;

Advertisements

Sue Davis, who played in 7 Up as a schoolgirl with friends from the late Lynn Johnson and Jackie Bassett, added: “I personally am in a good place, but it will get worse. You become sicker and older.

& # 39; Both parents are with me, so I think: & # 39; Seven years to go, who knows? Will I be here, will they be here? & # 39; There is an element that thinks this is a good time to end. & # 39;

The children themselves were specially selected to reflect the huge difference between different social and economic backgrounds at the time, with the assumption that each social class would determine what each child would do in later life.

Walker (photo) said he remembered that he was the & # 39; chic kids & # 39; had defeated, including Balden, now trained by Oxford, who then aspired to a missionary in Africa.

Walker (photo) said he remembered that he was the & # 39; chic kids & # 39; had defeated, including Balden, now trained by Oxford, who then aspired to a missionary in Africa.

Walker (photo) said he remembered that he was the & # 39; chic kids & # 39; had defeated, including Balden, now trained by Oxford, who then aspired to a missionary in Africa.

Bruce Balden (pictured above as a child) was branded as one of the chic kids on the show
Advertisements

Bruce Balden (pictured above as a child) was branded as one of the chic kids on the show

Bruce Balden (pictured above as a child) was branded as one of the chic kids on the show

An image from the 56 UP documentary with 56 Up with Jackie Bassett, Lynn Johnson and Sue Davis, seven years old

An image from the 56 UP documentary with 56 Up with Jackie Bassett, Lynn Johnson and Sue Davis, seven years old

An image from the 56 UP documentary with 56 Up with Jackie Bassett, Lynn Johnson and Sue Davis, seven years old

And for at least some of the children involved, their lives have turned out the way they thought it would be.

Advertisements

Walker said he reminded the film of beating the & # 39; chic children & # 39; including the now-educated Oxfords Balden, who then aspired to become a missionary in Africa.

He now teaches at a school in St. Albans.

Balden said: & # 39; There is something about the seven-year-old in all of us, you can see that.

& # 39; It was certainly a controversy about class at first, but it has become much more human than with the stories. & # 39;

But life has gotten worse for some people involved in the show, where Nick Hitchon is diagnosed with cancer.

The group - 21 years old: from left to right: Bruce Andrew Peter John Jackie Lynn (back) Neil front Tony Charles Sue Symon Paul Suzy and Nick

The group - 21 years old: from left to right: Bruce Andrew Peter John Jackie Lynn (back) Neil front Tony Charles Sue Symon Paul Suzy and Nick

The group – 21 years old: from left to right: Bruce Andrew Peter John Jackie Lynn (back) Neil front Tony Charles Sue Symon Paul Suzy and Nick

Apted said the news & # 39; extremely painful & # 39; had been and added: & We all love them. It's a close-knit family and you don't want to hurt people, but we all know we have to do a job. And it's important.

& # 39; No one has ever done this before and no one will ever do it again. We have a very privileged position, so we have to get the best out of it, even if it is a bit awful and painful. & # 39;

The original show was intended as a one-off, but after the cameras came back at the age of 14 to check the protégés, updates at intervals of seven years thereafter became routine.

Jackie Bassett, Lynn Johnson and Sue Davis pictured above who all participated in the documentary
Advertisements

Jackie Bassett, Lynn Johnson and Sue Davis pictured above who all participated in the documentary

Jackie Bassett, Lynn Johnson and Sue Davis pictured above who all participated in the documentary

Jackie Bassett, Lynn Johnson and Sue Davis while filming for 56UP, they can be seen with photos from other parts of the documentary

Jackie Bassett, Lynn Johnson and Sue Davis while filming for 56UP, they can be seen with photos from other parts of the documentary

Jackie Bassett, Lynn Johnson and Sue Davis while filming for 56UP, they can be seen with photos from other parts of the documentary

It started at Granada Television for ITV and followed the lives of the fourteen children. All episodes were broadcast on ITV, except in the 6th episode that was shown on the BBC.

Michael Apted (photo above), 78, who has been running the program since 1964, said that the next week 63 Up may be the last after 56 years
Advertisements

Michael Apted (photo above), 78, who has been running the program since 1964, said that the next week 63 Up may be the last after 56 years

Michael Apted (photo above), 78, who has been running the program since 1964, said that the next week 63 Up may be the last after 56 years

The first episode began in London Zoo, with a cast of 20 children, as the narrator announces: & # 39; We have brought these 20 children together for the very first time. & # 39;

The series then follows the stories of just fourteen children, Bruce Balden, Jackie Bassett, Symon Basterfield, Andrew Brackfield, John Brisby, Peter Davies, Susan Davis, Charles Furneaux, Nicholas Hitchon, Neil Hughes, Lynn Johnson, Paul Kligerman, Suzanne Lusk and Tony Walker.

One participant Lynne Johnson died in 2013, but the rest of the group is still alive, but many have stopped over the years with various issues, with one of the cast members Nicholas Hitchon diagnosed with cancer.

Advertisements

The idea for the program was inspired by the Jesuit who said: & # 39; Give me the child until he is seven and I will show you the man. & # 39;

Since its launch in 1964, the & # 39; s programs have become notorious, even in the Top 50 of best documentaries from Channel 4 in 2005.

Although he spoke of British children, Davis noted that success had been achieved for the show in the US, with Americans embracing her on the street.

Symon Basterfield (photo above) was one of the children in the original documentary and also appeared in 49 Up, broadcast in 2005

Symon Basterfield (photo above) was one of the children in the original documentary and also appeared in 49 Up, broadcast in 2005

Symon Basterfield (photo above) was one of the children in the original documentary and also appeared in 49 Up, broadcast in 2005

She said: & # 39; In America, I went to a film festival with Michael, and the Americans are crazy about this program. & # 39;

She added: & # 39; They said they had been watching me since I was seven years old. & # 39;

In 2012 the show returned with musician Pete Davies who returned to the show after being one of the participants to stop.

Mr. Davies had been on the sidelines since he retired from the show after being broadcast in 1984.

At the age of 28, Davies was a disillusioned teacher and decided to quit after his angry criticism of the Thatcher government provoked a fierce response.

He reconnected his contemporaries after agreeing to a request from director Michael Apted.

Then Mr. Davies said: & They decided that they would portray me as the angry young Red in Thatchers England.

& # 39; I was absolutely stunned, really shocked, at the level of bad will that was focused on me. & # 39;

Davies said he was so drawn to the experience that he stopped watching the series.

In the new series, celebrities fans look back to their highly contrasting school days. Sally Lindsay and John Thomson recall their teenage tests and triumphs.

Stanley Johnson (pictured above) takes a picture of himself as a young boy in 1964 as he talks about his views on parenthood for the new documentary 7UP and me

Stanley Johnson (pictured above) takes a picture of himself as a young boy in 1964 as he talks about his views on parenthood for the new documentary 7UP and me

Stanley Johnson (pictured above) takes a picture of himself as a young boy in 1964 as he talks about his views on parenthood for the new documentary 7UP and me

Julia Bradbury takes a picture of herself as a young girl in 1964, as she appears on the show that will be broadcast next month

Julia Bradbury takes a picture of herself as a young girl in 1964, as she appears on the show that will be broadcast next month

Julia Bradbury takes a picture of herself as a young girl in 1964, as she appears on the show that will be broadcast next month

Lord Sebastian Coe compares his sporting dreams with those of the jockey Tony in the Up series while Michael Sheen remembers the moment when his hope for a football career ended.

Stanley Johnson, Eamonn Holmes and Julia Bradbury share their opposing views on parenthood.

Sir Tony Robinson and Ben Bailey Smith explain which characters in the Up documentaries have had the greatest impact on them.

This is while William Roache, Rula Lenska and Baroness Tanni Gray Thompson think about the sadness of losing their parents.

Sadie Frost, pictured above with a picture of herself in 1964 talking about what the 7UP documentary meant to her

Sadie Frost, pictured above with a picture of herself in 1964 talking about what the 7UP documentary meant to her

Sadie Frost, pictured above with a picture of herself in 1964 talking about what the 7UP documentary meant to her

Stay with the Seven Up children: they once dreamed of being astronauts and jockeys, so where are they now, fifty years later?

Millions have been following the lives of the Seven Up children for decades – 14 children plucked from different walks of life to participate in a documentary about their hopes for the future growing up in Britain in the sixties.

The show was originally intended as a one-off, but after the cameras came back at the age of 14 to check the protégés, updates at intervals of seven years thereafter became routine. Now is the time to see what has become of the participants, who are now 56 years old.

In 2012, the latest documentary was documented where the children are now, almost 50 years after they were first broadcast to the public as schoolboys with new faces who wanted to be astronauts, jockeys or missionaries.

The idea for the program was inspired by the Jesuit who said: & # 39; Give me the child until he is seven and I will show you the man. & # 39; And for at least some of the children involved, their lives have turned out the way they thought it would be.

Jackie Bassett, one of the girls picked from the East End of London to represent the working class, admitted to The Guardian: & I have become as good as expected & # 39 ;.

Married at 24, she was divorced by her thirties, after which she was confronted with single parenthood when she had a son, Charlie (she never revealed his father's identity). She continued a new relationship with partner Ian, with whom she had two sons but who also separated.

Meanwhile, Bruce Bladen, who was a student at a prestigious boarding school when the show was first broadcast in 1964, did not deviate too far from the environment of his childhood because he is now a math teacher at a respected private school in Hertfordshire. When he was seven, he said he wanted to become a missionary and he made his dream come true when he was teaching in Bangladesh after graduating from Oxford.

Another of the Seven Up topics, Symon Basterfield, who was in a care center from an early age, said he thought he and the other children were expected to fit into the background of their background when they were first filmed .

& # 39; We (the children in care) had to have aspirations for what we wanted in life, but the boys from rich backgrounds were encouraged to say that their lives were plotted and planned. They were all hope and dreams for us, but their lives were mapped. & # 39;

Symon's life began turbulent, he never knew his father and as a child of a mixed race relationship he was often exposed to prejudice. He married and had five children, but was divorced by his thirties and severely affected by the loss of his mother, who died when he was 35. This meant that he did not participate in the documentary 35 Up. & # 39; It's a period I don't want to talk about & # 39 ;, he said.

He has since remarried and has another child and now works as a freight handler. He and his second wife are foster parents with them in the Heathrow area and have cared for more than 60 vulnerable children over the years.

Like Symon, the life of Neil Hughes took place in turns that could never have been predicted. When he first appeared on television as a bright seven-year-old in his Liverpool suburban school, he said with tenderness: & When I grow up, I want to become an astronaut, but if I can't, I think I'm a bus driver. & # 39;

Later documentaries showed that Neil had failed to reach Oxford University in his dreams. When he was in his early twenties, he had left the University of Aberdeen and lived in a squat. During his thirties he struggled to earn a living and spent time being homeless or in churches in Scotland. Since then, he has turned his life around and became a district councilor in Cumbria before applying for Carlisle at the 2010 general election, where he finished third.

Meanwhile, other participants achieved their dreams. Tony Walker, from the East End of London, did manage to become a jockey, albeit briefly, and raced against Lester Piggott before becoming a taxi driver. And Charles Furneaux, one of three boys followed by a Kensington prep school, continued to make documentaries of his own, most successfully as a producer of & # 39; Touching the Void & # 39 ;.

For Michael Apted, who began as a documentary investigator and became director, the unpredictable nature of the participant's lives is the reason that the Up series has become an important social experiment, as well as an indispensable display over the past decades.

& # 39; You are scared when you go back that bad things happened & # 39 ;, he told The Guardian about what it's like to catch up with the Up members at seven-year intervals. & # 39; That is the curse of the documentaries. You want everyone to do good things, but you also want good stories. & # 39;

He adds that although some of the children involved have refrained from participating in various stages of the documentary over the years, the majority have remained involved and become like a family.

& # 39; Some of us are close by, some of us are not around. Some of them like me, some of them not. A family is a very good idea of ​​what this is, because we have been together for almost 50 years. & # 39;

They have also been lucky that an accident or illness has not yet claimed the lives of those involved.

& # 39; When we lose someone, the others will think very hard about doing it again & # 39 ;, admits the show producer, Claire Lewis. & # 39; I don't know what effect that would have on us and on them. It is very difficult to see yourself getting old on the screen. & # 39;

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news