MI6 flies transgender flag to headquarters for the first time as boss ‘C’ praises trans and non-binary spies

0

MI6 first flown the transgender flag from its London headquarters on the occasion of the Transgender Day of Visibility.

Richard Moore, known as C for Controller, said trans and non-binary spies helped make the Secret Service stronger.

He said he was proud of his staff after ordering the flag to fly from the roof of the building on the Thames this week.

MI6 first flown the transgender flag from its London headquarters on the occasion of the Transgender Day of Visibility.

MI6 first flown the transgender flag from its London headquarters on the occasion of the Transgender Day of Visibility.

The flag is made of blue, pink and white stripes representing traditional masculine and feminine colors, with the white for people changing gender or not identifying as a particular gender

The flag is made of blue, pink and white stripes representing traditional masculine and feminine colors, with the white for people changing gender or not identifying as a particular gender

The flag is made of blue, pink and white stripes representing traditional masculine and feminine colors, with the white for people changing gender or not identifying as a particular gender

Mr. Moore, 57, said: ‘We are proud of our trans and non-binary colleagues and want to provide an inclusive workplace where you can be your true self.

‘Diversity makes us more effective, inclusion makes us stronger.’

The flag is made of blue, pink, and white stripes representing traditional masculine and feminine colors, with the white for people changing gender or who don’t identify as a particular gender.

MI6 has been flying a rainbow flag to mark Gay Pride since 2015, and the Secret Service has been hailed by Stonewall as one of the best employers for LGBT + personnel.

In February, Mr Moore apologized for the agency’s previous treatment of LGBT + people, adding that they had robbed themselves of the ‘best talent’ Britain has to offer.

He said a security bar for some individuals, which remained in effect until 1991, was “wrong, unjust and discriminatory.”

Richard Moore, known as C for Controller, said trans and non-binary spies helped make the Secret Service stronger

Richard Moore, known as C for Controller, said trans and non-binary spies helped make the Secret Service stronger

Richard Moore, known as C for Controller, said trans and non-binary spies helped make the Secret Service stronger

In a video posted to Twitter, Mr. Moore explained that the ban was in effect because of a misguided belief that LGBT + people were more susceptible to blackmail.

He said, “This was wrong, unjust and discriminatory.

Dedicated, talented, public-minded people had their careers and lives ruined because it was claimed that being LGBT + was incompatible with being an intelligence professional.

This policy had shattered the dreams of other loyal and patriotic people to serve their country in MI6.

Today I apologize on behalf of MI6 for the way our LGBT + colleagues and fellow citizens were treated and express my regret to those whose lives have been affected.

He spoke of his pride in his staff after ordering the flag to fly from the roof of the building on the Thames this week.

He spoke of his pride in his staff after ordering the flag to fly from the roof of the building on the Thames this week.

He spoke of his pride in his staff after ordering the flag to fly from the roof of the building on the Thames this week.

Being LGBT + did not make these people a threat to national security – of course not.

“But the ban meant that we, in the intelligence and diplomatic services, were depriving ourselves of the best talent Britain had to offer.”

Although same-sex relationships were decriminalized in 1967, the ban on LGBT + people serving in the agencies and the diplomatic service remained in effect after a series of Cold War espionage scandals.

Guy Burgess and Anthony Blunt, of the infamous Cambridge spy circle that defected to the Soviet Union in 1951, were gay, while a third, Donald Maclean, may have been bisexual.

Hero codebreaker Alan Turing was forced out of GCHQ in the 1950s when he was found to be in a gay relationship

Hero codebreaker Alan Turing was forced out of GCHQ in the 1950s when he was found to be in a gay relationship

Hero codebreaker Alan Turing was forced out of GCHQ in the 1950s when he was found to be in a gay relationship

In the 1950s, World War II hero codebreaker and mathematician Alan Turing was forced out of GCHQ when it was revealed that he was in a gay relationship before being chemically neutered.

He later took his own life at the age of 41.

In 2013, the Queen pardoned him posthumously, only the fourth to be granted under the Royal Privilege of Mercy since World War II.

Mr. Moore added that the effect of the ban has lingered in the bureau ever since.

He said: “ Some staff who chose to come out were treated badly for not disclosing their sexuality earlier during their security screening.

Others who joined in the period after 1991 felt unwelcome. That treatment fueled a reluctance to be themselves in the workplace. “This was also unacceptable.”