Mexican experts: Mayan text of almost 1,000 years of authentic antiquity

This undated photo published by the National Institute of Anthropology and History of Mexico (INAH) shows an ancient Mayan pictographic text that has been judged authentic by scholars in Mexico City

The 10 surviving pages of the & # 39; book & # 39; Folding tree bark will now be known as Mexico's Codex Maya, the researchers said.

It is a book with double page bark paper, coated with stucco on both sides and painted on one side.

It may have originally had 20 pages, but some were lost after centuries in a cave in the southern state of Chiapas.

The lower parts of the pages are badly damaged by moisture, eroding and staining the bottom of each page.

This undated photo published by the National Institute of Anthropology and History of Mexico (INAH) shows an ancient Mayan pictographic text that has been judged authentic by scholars in Mexico City

This undated photo published by the National Institute of Anthropology and History of Mexico (INAH) shows an ancient Mayan pictographic text that has been judged authentic by scholars in Mexico City

The document contains a series of observations and predictions related to the astral movement of Venus.

The document contains a series of observations and predictions related to the astral movement of Venus.

The document contains a series of observations and predictions related to the astral movement of Venus.

The lost pages would have been the first eight and the last two

It contains a series of observations and predictions related to the astral movement of Venus.

Mayan texts are written in a series of syllabic glyphs, in which a stylized painted figure often represents a syllable.

Each page of the codex has been painted on one side with a figure standing to the left.

Each figure holds a weapon and most grab a rope that carries a restricted captive.

It is believed that Codex was created by a scribe during the "difficult times" when both Chichén Itzá and Tula were falling in decline.

A smaller sheet of bark paper was attached to the lined sheet, and was radiocarbon dated 1230 AD, so the codex is the oldest Mesoamerican codex known.

The lack of incrustations or insect damage in the codex suggests that, if it is genuine, it was stored inside a container for hundreds of years.

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