Meteorologist claims that storm hunters & # 39; mobs & # 39; are desperately looking for viral content

& # 39; It's a ticking time bomb! & # 39 ;: Meteorologist claims that storm hunters & # 39; mobs & # 39; become those blocking roads, creating traffic jams and driving on the wrong side of highways in a desperate search for viral content

  • Storm hunters have been in force, with more than 60 tornadoes pounding Midwest since Monday
  • A meteorologist claims that fans of extreme weather conditions ignore the safety of others
  • Matthew Capucci claims that hunters are desperate to get clicks and views that earn them money
  • Capucci claims to have witnessed pursuers who park on roads, create traffic jams and drive along the wrong side of the highway in an effort to capture images to make them famous

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With more than 60 tornadoes reported in the Midwestern America since Monday, stormers have left the field to record incredible weather conditions.

And while storm hunting is not a new practice at all, a meteorologist claims it is becoming increasingly dangerous through social media, where hunters are making every effort to capture viral content that they hope will become famous.

Written in an op-ed for The Washington Post on Tuesday, Matthew Cappuci states that hunters now & # 39; gangs & # 39; have become & # 39; more dangerous than the tornado & # 39; s itself & # 39; s.

Capucci claims he saw in the course of last week that storm fighters endanger the lives of fellow citizens by blocking important intersections, driving along the wrong side of highways and parking on roads to take photos.

A meteorologist claims that storming becomes increasingly dangerous due to social media, with hunters making extreme efforts to capture viral content

A meteorologist claims that storming becomes increasingly dangerous due to social media, with hunters making extreme efforts to capture viral content

Storm hunters watch an impending storm in Oklahoma last week

Storm hunters watch an impending storm in Oklahoma last week

Storm hunters watch an impending storm in Oklahoma last week

He even stated that he witnessed & # 39; files that were 200 cars & # 39; deep, allegedly caused by hunters trying to capture Instagram-worthy content.

& # 39; The arrival of smartphones encouraged many to think & # 39; I can do this & # 39; & # 39 ;, he writes. & # 39; Things like & # 39; extreme & # 39; stamps, gets clicks and views [s] that earn money. & # 39;

He adds: & # 39; With big wins on the line, the dangerous behavior will only get worse. Illegal driving is not controlled by the police and the judiciary; they are busy during heavy weather. And there is no real way to practically limit the number of rushers or tourists that stretch out on it & # 39 ;.

Capucci says that storm chasing is now & # 39; a ticking time bomb & # 39; is.

Storm hunters can cause traffic jams while blocking roads during filming of extreme weather conditions. Storm hunters are depicted in this image from Oklahoma in May 2017

Storm hunters can cause traffic jams while blocking roads during filming of extreme weather conditions. Storm hunters are depicted in this image from Oklahoma in May 2017

Storm hunters can cause traffic jams while blocking roads during filming of extreme weather conditions. Storm hunters are depicted in this image from Oklahoma in May 2017

Meteorologist Matthew Cappuci says that the safety of ordinary citizens has been compromised

Meteorologist Matthew Cappuci says that the safety of ordinary citizens has been compromised

Meteorologist Matthew Cappuci says that the safety of ordinary citizens has been compromised

Various messages on social media seem to support Capucci's complaints.

On Monday, an Oklahoma resident was trapped in slow traffic by storm fighters who stopped to record content.

& # 39; Horrible hunter convergence southwest of Mangum, Oklahoma. I now understand why some pursuers in this type of scenario do not take storm collection into account. Totally ridiculous. 15 – 2 MPH speeds with remains ridiculously frequent stops, & they shared on Twitter.

But while rush hunters may be engaged in practices that endanger other citizens, they too often participate in unsafe behavior that can lead to their own death.

On resident took to Twitter to complain about slow traffic, allegedly caused by storm fighters

On resident took to Twitter to complain about slow traffic, allegedly caused by storm fighters

On resident took to Twitter to complain about slow traffic, allegedly caused by storm fighters

Many enthusiasts want to make desperate effort to capture content that they hope will bring them money and fame

Many enthusiasts want to make desperate effort to capture content that they hope will bring them money and fame

Many enthusiasts want to make desperate effort to capture content that they hope will bring them money and fame

In 2017, storm hunters Kelley Gene Williamson and Randall Delane Yarnall were killed during a two-stroke crash in Texas while chasing a tornado.

They are said to have a stop sign, collide with another car and kill Corbin Lee Jaeger.

The run-up to their collision was caught in front of the camera, and a new trial claims that the storm-chasing duo were encouraged to participate in unsafe behavior of The Weather Channel, for whom they were filming.

According to CBS, the suit – filed by the victim's mother – claims that Williamson and Yarnall & # 39; time and again express their negligence on basic road safety laws & # 39; have shown in video & # 39; s posted on Williamson & # 39; s storm on YouTube channel.

One resident is pictured awaiting an impending tornado in New Mexico in May 2017

One resident is pictured awaiting an impending tornado in New Mexico in May 2017

One resident is pictured awaiting an impending tornado in New Mexico in May 2017

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