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Men older than 6 feet are TWO times more likely to become infected with Covid-19, the study claims

Tall people may be at greater risk of getting Covid-19, according to research that makes the theory that the disease is present in the air heavier.

Data from 2,000 people in the UK and US showed that men over 6ft were diagnosed with coronavirus twice as often.

Women were also more likely to be over 6 feet tall. But there were so few in the study, the results are not reliable.

The researchers said the findings don’t necessarily mean that tall people are somehow genetically more vulnerable to the infection.

Instead, the team believes the results indicate that Covid-19 spreads through tiny particles called aerosols that linger in the air after they are exhaled.

Scientists said taller people would no longer be at risk if the virus were primarily spread by sneezing or coughing, creating larger drops that quickly fall to the ground.

Health officials have so far ruled out that Covid-19 is airborne. But admittedly recently, they are revising “emerging evidence” that it is.

A study of 2,000 people in the UK and US found that the risk of Covid-19 doubles for people over six feet

A study of 2,000 people in the UK and US found that the risk of Covid-19 doubles for people over six feet

The average male in England was 5 ft 9 in (175.3 cm) and the average female was 5 ft 3 in (161.6 cm) in 2010, according to official data.

The research results were analyzed by a team of data scientists in the UK, Norway and the US, led by experts from the University of Oxford.

The study looked at a range of personal and work-related factors that could influence the risk of infection with SARS-Cov-2, the virus that causes Covid-19.

Respondents were asked about their work status, income, how they travel to work, whether they live with other people and whether they have socialized a lot.

Of the 2,000 people surveyed – including 1,000 in the UK and 1,000 in the US – 339 were more than six feet tall.

Analysis not yet studied by fellow scientists showed that larger people were more often diagnosed with Covid-19.

In the UK, men and women were more than double the risk of Covid-19 compared to people under six feet.

In the US, the odds were slightly lower for men, but extremely high for women – who were more than nine times more likely to get the virus.

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION ALLOWED COVID-19 MAY AVIATE

Scientists from the World Health Organization recently admitted that “evidence is emerging” that the coronavirus can be spread by air.

The UN agency previously said that the virus mainly spreads through droplets expelled from the nose and mouth of an infected person.

These sink quickly to the ground, but can end up in the nose or mouth of other people nearby. They also land on surfaces where the virus can be picked up.

But there have been calls for the WHO to update its guidelines to warn that the infection may linger in the air and be inhaled by others.

Airborne transmission allows a virus to spread into droplets so small that they can float in the air and not fall after being propelled by coughing or sneezing.

Dr. Maria Van Kerkhove, the technical director for Covid-19 at the WHO, confirmed on July 7 that the agency was examining the theory that the bug could be spread by air.

She said, “We talked about the possibility of air transmission and aerosol transmission as one of the transmission modes of COVID-19.”

WHO technical leader for infection prevention and control, Benedetta Allegranzi, said at Tuesday’s Geneva briefing that there was evidence of coronavirus transmission to the air, but this was not final.

“The possibility of air transmission in public institutions – especially in very specific circumstances, crowded, closed, poorly ventilated environments described, cannot be ruled out,” she said.

“But the evidence needs to be collected and interpreted, and we continue to support it.”

The WHO consideration follows 239 scientists in 32 countries writing a letter to the UN agency to recognize growing evidence that the virus is present in the air.

A professor who signed the paper said there will be concerns about labeling the virus in the air because it could cause panic.

But because there was such a small percentage of women over two feet in the data, the researchers didn’t say the finding was significant.

The link between height and Covid-19 was only seen in the UK and the researchers did not explain this.

It can be explained by other factors, such as bigger men working in construction where they may be at greater risk.

Height had previously been linked to the development of diseases such as dementia and irregular heartbeat, which scientists believe may be due to genetic variants or growth hormones.

But in this study, the researchers didn’t suggest that tall people were more at risk for Covid-19 because of their biology.

The findings support the theory that small coronavirus particles emitted by exhalation and speech can linger in the air for hours.

Scientists from the World Health Organization admitted earlier this month that “evidence is emerging” that the coronavirus can be spread by air.

The UN agency previously said that the virus mainly spreads through droplets expelled from the nose and mouth of an infected person.

These sink quickly to the ground, but can end up in the nose or mouth of other people nearby. They also land on surfaces where the virus can be picked up.

But there have been calls for the WHO to update its guidelines to warn that the infection may linger in the air and be inhaled by others.

Airborne transmission allows a virus to spread into aerosols – droplets so small that they can float in the air after exhalation.

Experts said taller people wouldn’t be at greater risk if the transfer were primarily via droplets – but because they’re larger, they could be exposed to more of the particles, the team hypothesized.

The article – which has not yet been published in a medical journal – said, “If large drops falling down were more significant, larger people would be expected to be at less risk.”

The social distance rule of one to two meters is based on the fact that drops do not pass through the air.

But if SARS-Cov-2 does indeed spread through aerosols, as growing evidence shows, it would have huge implications for disease control.

It may mean that wearing a mask is even more important than thought, according to Professor Evan Kontopantelis of the University of Manchester.

He discussed the findings and said, “The results of this study … suggest … aerosol transmission is possible.

“This has been suggested by other studies, but our confirmation method is new.

While social distance is still important because droplet transmission is still likely, it does suggest wearing a mask may be as if it were not more effective in prevention.

“But the air purification in indoor areas also needs further investigation.”

Professor Paul Anand, research director at the Open University: ‘Much scientific research focuses on dissemination patterns and underlying transmission mechanisms.

But as economies and societies reopen, it’s important to learn more about the role of personal factors as predictors of transmission.

“While both are market economies, the US and UK differ in the extent and manner in which they provide access to healthcare and welfare support – and that is demonstrated to some extent by the associations that demonstrate the data.”

The study also found that people were more likely to get coronavirus if they had to travel to work by public transport.

While the paper has not yet been peer-reviewed, the authors wanted to disclose their findings during the aerosol transmission debate.

Paul Hunter, a professor of medicine at the University of East Anglia, said of the findings: “In my opinion, this pre-pressure should be interpreted with caution.

The authors analyzed a significant number of possible predictors for a range of outcome measures.

One of the biggest mistakes people make in epidemiological surveys is testing multiple hypotheses. The more hypothesis tests you perform, the more likely you are to highlight associations that only came about by chance.

“In my opinion, this analysis doesn’t even provide convincing evidence that tall people are protected from the infection, let alone whether it means aerosol transmission.”

HOW DOES COVID-19 SPREAD?

The World Health Organization says the virus that causes Covid-19 is primarily transmitted between people through respiratory droplets, which come from the airways when people breathe.

Droplets containing saliva, mucus and other respiratory tract substances, including viruses, are larger than pure air particles.

After being expelled from the body, they travel short distances before falling to the ground, which is why social distance is so crucial.

The droplets, which may contain viruses, can enter directly into another person’s nose or mouth if not caught in tissue. Or they fall by gravity and land on surfaces, where it can live up to three days.

If someone else touches that contaminated surface, the virus can spread to their hand and then enter the body and cause an infection the next time they touch their eyes, nose or mouth.

The WHO says it is now looking at the evidence that SARS-CoV-2 is in the air, meaning it can be broadcast in breath.

Airborne transmission differs from droplet transmission in that it refers to the presence of microbes in droplet cores, which are typically considered particles less than 5 μm in diameter.

They can remain in the air for a long time, which means that transmission can occur when the infectious person has left the room, and is transferred to others over distances greater than one meter.

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