Men (but NOT women) prefer to do housework such as vacuuming and washing to go to work

A study by the University of Oxford discovered that, for some men, putting on rubber gloves is more fun than their daily work.

Vacuuming and washing is not very important in anyone's list of fun activities.

For some men, however, putting on rubber gloves to do housework is apparently more enjoyable than a day at the office.

One study found that men are less likely to enjoy their jobs than women on average, while working long days and feeling rushed into work have a stronger negative impact on them.

A study by the University of Oxford discovered that, for some men, putting on rubber gloves is more fun than their daily work.

A study by the University of Oxford discovered that, for some men, putting on rubber gloves is more fun than their daily work.

It means that when asked to rate activities, men put domestic chores above work, while it is the opposite for women.

The University of Oxford asked more than 4,000 people in the United Kingdom to rate their enjoyment of daily activities on a weekday and a weekend. On a scale of one to seven, with seven enjoying something "a lot", domestic chores reached 4.5 for men, over 4.4 for their paid work.

Dr. Pierre Walthery, who led the study, said it may be because men do less cleaning and DIY when it comes to domestic chores, while women spend more time on sad tasks.

But the feeling of men being stressed at work can also make some tasks seem attractive in comparison. He said: "We know from previous research that men of childbearing age tend to work longer hours than women and complain more about it." For women, on the other hand, work can be an escape from the responsibilities of being at home and the unpaid work they do there. "

Participants were asked to rate their daily activities every ten minutes in a diary, with women classifying household tasks in 4.4, below a 4.5 pleasure score for work. The results suggest that women are more stoic when they have to work early or late at night.

Men put domestic tasks such as cleanliness, above work, while it is the opposite for women

Men put domestic tasks such as cleanliness, above work, while it is the opposite for women

Men put domestic tasks such as cleanliness, above work, while it is the opposite for women

Dr. Walthery, who will present his findings today at the British Association of Sociology's employment conference in Belfast, added: "Women are more likely to do humanitarian work, which includes nursing and childcare, and this may explain the difference, since we know that these jobs provide more enjoyment However, self-employment has a more positive effect on men than women, showed this study, so it could make work more attractive than domestic tasks for they ".

The University of Oxford's Time-Use Research Center found that both sexes rated activities such as socializing, caring for others, volunteering, and cultural events as more enjoyable than paid work, usually qualifying six seven.

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