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Research to be published in the journal Organizational Dynamics has shown that 27 percent of men avoid one-on-one meetings with female colleagues, a possible backlash on the movement that surpassed manipulative men in powerful positions

Men are now much more reluctant to shake hands with a female colleague or to hire an attractive woman after #MeToo, finds study

  • According to a study, men are more reluctant to shake the hand of a female colleague
  • The study suggested that 19% of men hesitated to hire an attractive woman
  • Another 21% of the men in the survey sample said they would be reluctant to hire women for jobs that require close interaction, such as for business travel
  • The responses collected in 2019 from employees in different industries showed an increase in men's fears among female colleagues after the # MeToo campaign
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Men are now significantly more reluctant to communicate with their female colleagues after the # MeToo movement, a new study suggests.

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Research published in the journal Organisational Dynamics has shown that 27 percent of men avoid individual encounters with female colleagues, a possible backlash on the movement that manipulative men turned up in powerful positions.

The research suggests that men might follow a trend set by Vice President Mike Pence, who once claimed to never dine alone with his wife.

Research to be published in the journal Organizational Dynamics has shown that 27 percent of men avoid one-on-one meetings with female colleagues, a possible backlash on the movement that surpassed manipulative men in powerful positions

Research to be published in the journal Organizational Dynamics has shown that 27 percent of men avoid one-on-one meetings with female colleagues, a possible backlash on the movement that surpassed manipulative men in powerful positions

According to the survey, another 21 percent of men said they would be reluctant to hire women for jobs that require close interaction, such as business travel.

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And a shocking 19 percent admitted that they were hesitant to hire an attractive woman.

It is worrying that the data indicate that the trend is deteriorating. The responses collected in 2019 from employees in various industries showed an increase in men's fears among female colleagues.

In 2018, 15 percent of men said they would be more reluctant to hire women for jobs that require close interpersonal interactions with women, compared to 21 percent in 2019.

Meanwhile, according to the study, women also seem wary of hiring other women. And there was also an indication that men are more reluctant to shake a woman's hand in case she thinks it's tricky.

The research suggests that men might follow a trend established by Vice President Mike Pence, who claimed never to dine alone with his wife, apart from his own wife.

The research suggests that men might follow a trend established by Vice President Mike Pence, who claimed never to dine alone with his wife, apart from his own wife.

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The research suggests that men might follow a trend established by Vice President Mike Pence, who claimed never to dine alone with his wife, apart from his own wife.

The research also sought insight into what men and women thought was intimidation.

The surveys describe 19 behaviors, such as continuing to ask a female subordinate after she has said no, or e-mailing sexual jokes to a female subordinate and commenting on the appearance of a female subordinate, and asking if they considered this intimidation.

The results suggested that & # 39; most men know what sexual harassment is, and most women know what it is & # 39 ;, Leanne Atwater, a professor at the University of Houston and one of the study's authors, told the Harvard Business Review.

& # 39; The idea that men don't know their behavior is bad and that women make a mountain of a molehill is largely untrue. In any case, women are more flexible in defining intimidation. & # 39;

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