Melbourne tenant begs for advice after discovering landlord lives in her garden shed

Stunned tenant begs for help after discovering her LANDLORD lives in the gazebo

  • A tenant got an unexpected surprise when she moved into a Melbourne home
  • Her landlord said he would store things in the shed for a few months
  • But the woman discovered it was more than storage – he lived in the barn
  • After confronting him, he agreed to pay her $300 a month if she made him say:
  • He initially said he needs 45 days, but now he wants to stay for three months










A tenant got more than she bargained for when she discovered her landlord was living in the garden shed of her newly rented property.

The woman went to Fairy Floss, a Facebook real estate group for the metropolis of Melbourne, and asked its 267,500 members for advice about the bizarre scenario.

She said her landlord had told her he would be storing some things in the shed, but it soon became apparent that he lived there.

After confronting him, he offered to pay her $300 (AUD) a month if she allowed him to stay, insisting that he would only be there for a maximum of 45 days.

But when the tenant demanded her landlord sign a contract saying he would vacate the shed within 45 days, he changed his mind and told him to stay for three months.

A tenant turned to Fairy Floss, a Facebook real estate group for the metropolis of Melbourne, and asked its 267,500 members for advice after discovering that her landlord was living in her gazebo.

The woman said she was afraid to notify the real estate agency if they cancel the contract leaving her homeless.

Her post, which received more than 600 “likes” less than 24 hours after it was uploaded, divided opinion, with some calling the situation “hilarious” while others calling it a tragic sign of hard times.

‘This month I moved into a rented house. The landlord said he would leave some of his belongings in the shed but would move it all in a few months,” she wrote.

‘After moving in, I found out that my landlord secretly lives in the shed. I confronted him and he said he would pay me $300 a month if I let him stay. He said he would only stay 45 days.

“I found out today, after I asked him to sign a contract saying he would be out in 45 days, that he actually wants to stay for three months.

If I tell the real estate agent, the lease is void because he broke the rules and he could kick me out. Do I have any other options here?’

Bewildered reactions quickly poured in, with some wondering if the landlord was playing a prank on a naive tenant.

“It sounds like a plot from a movie!” wrote a woman.

‘This must be a joke,’ said a second, while a third added, ‘This is just weird… How do you even know he’s the landlord? Dodgy as!’

A fourth called it the “craziest real estate story” he’s ever heard, while a fifth tagged their friend and said, “Why am I introducing the landlord as Danny De Vito?”

The woman said she was afraid to notify the real estate agency if they cancel the contract leaving her homeless (stock image)

The woman said she was afraid to notify the real estate agency if they cancel the contract leaving her homeless (stock image)

Others urged the woman to contact her real estate agent and the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal (VCAT) immediately Monday morning.

“A landlord who pays a tenant to stay in their home must be a first,” one man wrote.

A woman shared a similar experience with a former landlord.

“This kind of happened to me. But they turned the shed into an Airbnb and gave my address to strangers online while I was having a baby — safe to say I’m out on bail!’ she wrote.

Many took it as a sad sign that people were going through difficult times during the pandemic.

“This makes me sad,” said one woman. “Remember that Covid has made many people unemployed.

She added: “I’m sure he’s very ashamed of the whole situation. I’m not saying it’s good what he’s doing, but keep your compassion when addressing/handling the situation.’

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