WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Melbourne speed camera raked in $11million in fines in just three months

How a Single Speed ​​Camera Raised $11 Million in Fines in Just THREE Months – Check out the places to watch your speedometer like a hawk

  • A Melbourne camera collected $11 million in fines from 300,000 drivers
  • The third lane alone pinged 12,000 motorists, raising a total of $4 million
  • Speed ​​reduced from 100 km/h to 80 km/h due to road works along the route
  • Other cameras across the city collect millions within a three-month period

A single speed camera has raised nearly $11 million from unsuspecting drivers in just three months.

The camera – set up across four lanes on the Western Ring Road in Broadmeadows, north of the Melbourne CBD – was responsible for 30,000 fines between October and December 2021.

About 12,000 motorists were pinged in the third lane alone, raising $4 million in three months.

At the same time, the speed limits on the section of road were lowered from 100 km/h to 80 hm/h due to road works between the M80 western ring road.

New speed cameras are responsible for millions of dollars in fines in Melbourne.  Pictured: Police attract drivers in Victoria

New speed cameras are responsible for millions of dollars in fines in Melbourne. Pictured: Police attract drivers in Victoria

Transport chief has called for an investigation into speed cameras and signs in some areas.  pictured: a Melbourne speed camera sign

Transport chief has called for an investigation into speed cameras and signs in some areas. pictured: a Melbourne speed camera sign

Melbourne’s Most Profitable Speed ​​Cameras:

1. Western Ring Road, Broadmeadows: $10,934,850 over 300,000 fines

2. Rosanna Road and Darebin Street, Heidelberg: $2,879,699 versus 9,892 fines

3. Fitzroy Street and Lakeside Drive, St Kilda: $1,895,061 over 6,681 fines.

4. King Street and La Trobe Street, West Melbourne: $1,556,893 over 5,556 fines.

5. North Road and Clayton Road, Oakleigh East: $1,058,871 over 3,656 fines.

Data captured between October and December 2021

Victorian Transport Association president Peter Anderson has been inundated with complaints from drivers who have been fined where speeds were reduced due to road works but where there was no visible construction.

“If we’re going to place temporary cameras, we need to know where they are and what they’re doing,” he told the… Herald Sun

“And we have to listen to the public when the cameras are treating us unfairly.”

Paul Freestone, owner of freight company Freestone’s Transport, called for an independent inquiry into the cameras and temporary speed limits – claiming that ‘lazy’ road workers are setting temporary speed limits and not removing them.

“We want someone to be able to independently watch how these cameras are set up – who’s setting them up? It’s a private company? Are all those cameras set up properly?’ he said.

New figures also show that a camera at the intersection of Rosanna Road and Darebin Street in Melbourne’s northeast Heidelberg has collected $2,879,699 across 10,000 fines.

At the intersection of Fitzroy Street and Lakeside Drive in St Kilda, 6,681 drivers faced speeding fines, forcing Victorians to cough up $1,895,061.

In the CBD, a camera at the intersection of King Street and La Trobe Street in West Melbourne was responsible for 5,556 fines – worth $1,556,893.

In all, 376,316 Victorians have been fined in the past three months, costing them more than $100 million.

One camera has been set up across four lanes on Western Ring Rd in Broadmeadows (pictured), north of the city's CBD, and has been responsible for 30,000 fines

One camera has been set up across four lanes on Western Ring Rd in Broadmeadows (pictured), north of the city’s CBD, and has been responsible for 30,000 fines

Data shows that the number of drivers pinged by mobile and fixed cameras increased by more than 16 percent from the same period last year and by 31 percent from the previous quarter from July to September.

However, due to the Covid restrictions enforced during those periods in 2021, fewer motorists were off the road.

The Department of Justice and Community Safety said speed limits were being enforced to keep drivers and road workers safe, and urged motorists to pay attention to road signs.

He added that it was “disappointing” to see so many Victorians ignoring the traffic rules.

Elvira Lazar, of the Royal Automobile Club of Victoria, defended the use of mobile speed cameras, saying they were a proven method of deterring speeding.

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More